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  • 1.
    Aries, Myriam
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Civil Engineering and Lighting Science.
    Editorial: Academically trained lighting designer2020In: Lighting Research and Technology, ISSN 1477-1535, E-ISSN 1477-0938, Vol. 52, no 7, p. 813-813Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 2.
    Aries, Myriam
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Civil Engineering and Lighting Science.
    Editorial: Human-centred integrative lighting and spill-over effects2021In: Lighting Research and Technology, ISSN 1477-1535, E-ISSN 1477-0938, Vol. 53, no 8, p. 699-699Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 3.
    Aries, Myriam
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Civil Engineering and Lighting Science.
    Editorial: Personalised lighting design2022In: Lighting Research and Technology, ISSN 1477-1535, E-ISSN 1477-0938, Vol. 54, no 6, p. 513-513Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 4.
    Aries, Myriam
    et al.
    Department of the Built Environment, Eindhoven University of Technology, Eindhoven, Netherlands.
    Aarts, Mariëlle
    Department of the Built Environment, Eindhoven University of Technology, Eindhoven, Netherlands.
    van Hoof, Joost
    Centre for Healthcare and Technology, Fontys University of Applied Sciences, Eindhoven, Netherlands.
    Daylight and health: A review of the evidence and consequences for the built environment2015In: Lighting Research and Technology, ISSN 1477-1535, E-ISSN 1477-0938, Vol. 47, no 1, p. 16-27Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Daylight has been associated with multiple health advantages. Some of these claims are associations, hypotheses or beliefs. This review presents an overview of a scientific literature search on the proven effects of daylight exposure on human health. Studies were identified with a search strategy across two main databases. Additionally, a search was performed based on specific health effects. The results are diverse and either physiological or psychological. A rather limited statistically significant and well-documented scientific proof for the association between daylight and its potential health consequences was found. However, the search based on specific health terms made it possible to create a first subdivision of associations with daylight, leading to the first practical implementations for building design.

  • 5.
    Aries, Myriam
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Civil Engineering and Lighting Science.
    Fischl, Géza
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Civil Engineering and Lighting Science.
    Lowden, A.
    Stress Research Institute, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Beute, F.
    LightGreen Health, Rena, Norway.
    The relationship of light exposure to sleep outcomes among office workers. Part 1: Working in the office versus at home before and during the COVID-pandemic2022In: Lighting Research and Technology, ISSN 1477-1535, E-ISSN 1477-0938Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The relationship between everyday light exposure and sleep was studied for office workers. The study was conducted during the upswing of the COVID-19 pandemic, enabling a comparison between Office and Home Workdays. Fifteen full-time office employees were monitored for a period of 4–6 weeks. They wore a light-tracking device on their clothes and had a sleep tracker at home. Compared to an Office Workday, light exposure was lower in the afternoon and total sleep time was almost 5 minutes longer on a Home Workday. Sleep efficiency was the same on both workday types. A higher median illuminance level in the afternoon was significantly related to later sleep onset on an Office Workday. Higher median illuminance levels in the morning were related to earlier awakening. Counter to expectations, higher light levels in the evening were also related to earlier awakening. Everyday light exposure matters for sleep quality but may affect circadian functioning differently than the often more extreme light interventions employed in laboratory experiments. Moreover, differences in outcomes between Office and Home Workdays signal the need for further investigation to provide supportive light levels during workhours.

  • 6.
    Beute, F.
    et al.
    LightGreen Health, Rena, Norway.
    Lowden, A.
    Stress Research Institute, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Aries, Myriam
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Civil Engineering and Lighting Science.
    The relationship of light exposure to sleep outcomes among office workers: Part 2: Comparison of days with and without social constraints2022In: Lighting Research and Technology, ISSN 1477-1535, E-ISSN 1477-0938Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Social constraints posed by work schedules influence sleep duration and timing. Everyday light exposure can help (or hinder) sleep outcomes. This study investigated the differences in the relationship between light exposure and sleep outcomes on days with and without social constraints using ambulatory assessment for 4?6?weeks for 15 office employees. The effects of light on sleep were investigated for both clock time and wake time (related to individual sleep times). Participants were exposed to more light during the morning and afternoon on workdays, and sleep times were later on days without social constraints. The relationship between light exposure and sleep was more pronounced, or sometimes even only present, for days without social constraints. In addition, no differences were found between clock time and wake time, which underlines the complexity of the relationship between everyday light exposure and sleep. Despite increased light exposure during workdays, the effects of light on sleep were more pronounced on days without social constraints. It may signal that office workers need a more substantial circadian stimulus (i.e. higher light exposure) for light to influence sleep outcomes on days with social constraints.

  • 7.
    Chraibi, S.
    et al.
    Philips Lighting B.V., Eindhoven, the Netherlands.
    Creemers, P.
    Department of the Built Environment, Building Lighting Group, Eindhoven University of Technology, Eindhoven, the Netherlands.
    Rosenkötter, C.
    Department of the Built Environment, Building Lighting Group, Eindhoven University of Technology, Eindhoven, the Netherlands.
    van Loenen, E. J.
    Department of the Built Environment, Building Lighting Group, Eindhoven University of Technology, Eindhoven, the Netherlands.
    Aries, Myriam
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Civil Engineering and Lighting Science.
    Rosemann, A. L. P.
    Department of the Built Environment, Building Lighting Group, Eindhoven University of Technology, Eindhoven, the Netherlands.
    Dimming strategies for open office lighting: User experience and acceptance2019In: Lighting Research and Technology, ISSN 1477-1535, E-ISSN 1477-0938, Vol. 51, no 4, p. 513-529Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sensor-triggered control strategies can limit the energy consumption of lighting by considering the presence of users in the office and dimming lighting down when it is not needed. In multi-user offices, the application of occupancy-based dimming at room level limits the energy saving potential. However, zone- or desk-based dimming may affect the comfort of co-workers due to its dynamics. This paper reports the assessment by 17 participants (30–50 years of age) of occupancy-based dimming in a mock-up office, using different dimming speeds. Participants consisted of co-workers experiencing changes triggered by others, and actors triggering these light changes. While the participants performed an office-based task, the luminaire above the actors’ desk was dimmed from approximately 550 lx to 350 lx (average horizontal illuminance), and vice versa. The participants evaluated the dimming conditions regarding their noticeability and acceptability. The study showed that the noticeability of light changes due to dimming, increases when fading times become shorter. Dimming with a fading time of at least two seconds was experienced as acceptable by more than 70% of the participants. The results of this experiment provide insights to system behaviour that does not compromise user experience while addressing energy efficient use of electric lighting.

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  • 8.
    Mangkuto, R. A.
    et al.
    Building Physics and Services, Department of the Built Environment, Eindhoven University of Technology, Eindhoven, Netherlands.
    Aries, Myriam
    Building Physics and Services, Department of the Built Environment, Eindhoven University of Technology, Eindhoven, Netherlands.
    Loenen, E. V.
    Building Physics and Services, Department of the Built Environment, Eindhoven University of Technology, Eindhoven, Netherlands.
    Hensen, J.
    Building Physics and Services, Department of the Built Environment, Eindhoven University of Technology, Eindhoven, Netherlands.
    Simulation of virtual natural lighting solutions with a simplified view2014In: Lighting Research and Technology, ISSN 1477-1535, E-ISSN 1477-0938, Vol. 46, no 2, p. 198-218Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Daylight is limited in time and space. In situations where daylight is insufficiently available, virtual natural lighting solutions (VNLS), which are systems that artificially provide lighting and view comparable to those of real windows and skylights, can be promising. VNLS can turn currently unused floor space into space with daylight qualities. The space-gaining potential of VNLS in buildings can be predicted using computational building performance simulation. This paper describes the approach of modelling VNLS with a simplified view, using the Radiance tool to evaluate the lighting performance in a reference office. The VNLS are modelled as arrays of small light sources resembling the sky, the horizon and the ground. The simulation results show that VNLS with wide beam angles generally offer a better uniformity and a larger percentage of sufficiently lit workplane area compared to those obtained with real windows under overcast sky conditions, while the discomfort glare remains comparable to that received from real windows.

  • 9.
    Newsham, Guy R.
    et al.
    National Research Council, Institute for Research in Construction, Ottawa, Canada.
    Aries, Myriam
    National Research Council, Institute for Research in Construction, Ottawa, Canada.
    Mancini, S.
    National Research Council, Institute for Research in Construction, Ottawa, Canada.
    Faye, G.
    National Research Council, Institute for Research in Construction, Ottawa, Canada.
    Individual control of electric lighting in a daylit space2008In: Lighting Research and Technology, ISSN 1477-1535, E-ISSN 1477-0938, Vol. 40, no 1, p. 25-41Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Participants (N=40) occupied a glare-free, daylit office laboratory for 1 day, and were prompted every 30 min to use dimming control over electric lighting to choose their preferred light level. Illuminances and luminances were recorded before and after each control opportunity; luminance maps were generated using a calibrated, high-dynamic range digital camera. Although there was a wide variation in chosen light levels between individuals, results showed a significant negative correlation between prevailing desktop illuminance and change in dimmer setting. This indicates that, from the perspective of occupants, daylight does displace electric lighting. Surprisingly, we did not find any luminance-based measure that was as good a predictor of participant dimmer choice as illuminance measured on the desktop. On average, manual dimming control in this situation reduced energy use for lighting by 25% compared to a fixed system delivering 500lx of electric lighting on the desktop.

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