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  • 1.
    Gholami, R.
    et al.
    Operation and Information Management Group, Aston Business School, Hanyang University, Seoul, South Korea.
    Lee, S. -YT.
    College of Information and Communications, Hanyang University, Seoul, South Korea.
    Heshmati, Almas
    TEPP College of Engineering, Seoul National University, Seoul, South Korea.
    The causal relationship between information and communication technology and foreign direct investment2006In: The World Economy, ISSN 0378-5920, E-ISSN 1467-9701, Vol. 29, no 1, p. 43-62Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper investigates the simultaneous causal relationship between investments in information and communication technology (ICT) and flows of foreign direct investment (FDI), with reference to its implications on economic growth. For the empirical analysis we use data from 23 major countries with heterogeneous economic development for the period 1976-99. Our causality test results suggest that there is a causal relationship from ICT to FDI in developed countries, which means that a higher level of ICT investment leads to an increase inflow of FDI. ICT may contribute to economic growth indirectly by attracting more FDI. Contrarily, we could not find significant causality from ICT to FDI in developing countries. Instead, we have partial evidence of opposite causality relationship: the inflow of FDI causes further increases in ICT investment and production capacity. ©United Nations University 2006.

  • 2.
    Hacker, R. Scott
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics, Finance and Statistics.
    Kim Karlsson, Hyunjoo
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics, Finance and Statistics.
    Månsson, Kristofer
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics, Finance and Statistics.
    The relationship between exchange rates and interest rate differentials: A wavelet approach2012In: The World Economy, ISSN 0378-5920, E-ISSN 1467-9701, Vol. 35, no 9, p. 1162-1185Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper uses wavelet analysis to investigate the relationship between the spot exchange rate and  interest rate differential for seven pairs of countries, with a small country, Sweden, included in each case. The key empirical results show that there tends to be a negative relationship between the spot exchange rate (domestic-currency price of foreign currency) and the nominal interest rate differential (approximately the domestic interest rate minus the foreign interest rate) at the shortest time scales, while a positive relationship is shown at the longest time scales. This indicates that among models of exchange rate determination using the asset approach, the sticky-price models are supported in the short-run and flexible-price models in the long-run.

  • 3.
    Johansson, Börje
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics. Lund University, Sweden.
    Johansson, Sara
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre of Excellence for Science and Innovation Studies (CESIS).
    Wallin, Tina
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre of Excellence for Science and Innovation Studies (CESIS).
    Internal and external knowledge and introduction of export varieties2015In: The World Economy, ISSN 0378-5920, E-ISSN 1467-9701, Vol. 38, no 4, p. 629-654Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Firms in local industries maintain their capability to generate new export varieties by simultaneously exploiting internal and external knowledge resources. The paper introduces the notion ‘variety triplet’ to distinguish individual export varieties, where a triplet is a unique combination of a firm, a product code and a destination country. For each date, the set of variety triplets in each local industry records all remaining export varieties introduced in the past. In view of this, the paper examines how internal and external knowledge of local industries influence the industry's scope and value of export varieties. First, the paper contributes by considering a local industry's internal and external knowledge, as well as the conjunction of its internal and external knowledge sources. Second, the knowledge sources are shown to influence both the stock and the dynamics of a local industry's variety triplets, using firm-level data from Sweden.

  • 4.
    Schneider, Andrea
    Institute of Public Economics, University of Münster, Münster, Germany.
    Corporate taxation of heterogeneous firms and the welfare effects of labour unions2017In: The World Economy, ISSN 0378-5920, E-ISSN 1467-9701, Vol. 40, no 4, p. 703-714Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper examines the welfare effects of powerful labour unions when the government levies a uniform tax rate – as is currently the case in most OECD countries – and firms are heterogeneous with respect to productivity. I show that an increase in the bargaining power of labour unions can decrease the welfare loss generated by restriction of the tax policy and provide conditions under which powerful labour unions decrease the likelihood that firms will move abroad. I also reproduce the well-known effect whereby powerful labour unions decrease corporate tax rates if firms are mobile. 

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