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  • 1.
    Berndt, Adele
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Marketing and Logistics.
    Klopper, HB
    Monash South Africa.
    Niemann-Struweg, Ilse
    Monash South Africa.
    Meintjes, Corne
    Monash South Africa.
    Resident co-creation: the case of the 2010 Soccer World Cup2013In: European Business Review, ISSN 0955-534X, E-ISSN 1758-7107, Vol. 25, no 4, p. 336-350Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of the study was to investigate the involvement and actions (co-creation) of residents of South Africa prior to the commencement of the 2010 Soccer World Cup, which was held in South Africa during June and July 2010.

    Quantitative research was conducted in the three major metropolitan centres in South Africa, using a self-completion questionnaire among residents in South Africa, using purposive sampling. The questionnaire consisted of two sections. Data collection was supervised by trained fieldworkers.

    The responses of 1 352 respondents who took part indicate significant differences between the involvement of the genders, language groups and nationalities, while in the case of actions, significant differences were found between genders and income groups. The study also found an association between the involvement and actions in the case of this mega-event.

    The research was conducted one month prior to the event, and those who had exhibited actions may have been predisposed to taking part in the event. Research was limited to three major centres in South Africa.

    This has implications for the marketing of mega-events in other countries as well as events other than sports events, specifically in the development of the marketing strategy associated with the event and more specifically the marketing communication strategy, focussed on attracting residents.

    The importance of the study can be found in the scarcity of the literature that primarily investigates the role of residents in the co-creation associated with a mega-event.

  • 2.
    Berndt, Adele
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Media, Management and Transformation Centre (MMTC).
    Petzer, Daniel J.
    Gordon Institute of Business Science, University of Pretoria, Johannesburg, South Africa.
    Mostert, Pierre
    Department of Marketing Management, University of Pretoria, South Africa.
    Brand avoidance – a services perspective2019In: European Business Review, ISSN 0955-534X, E-ISSN 1758-7107, Vol. 31, no 2, p. 179-196Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose

    The purpose of this paper is to gain insight into brand avoidance of service brands and explore whether the different types of brand avoidance identified in a product context apply to service providers.

    Design/methodology/approach

    Because of the exploratory nature of the study, the critical incident method and semi-structured interviews were used to achieve the purpose of the study.

    Findings

    The findings suggest that five types of brand avoidance, as identified in studies involving product brands, can be identified as impacting service brands. In addition, the findings show that advertising avoidance should be expanded to communication avoidance because of the multifarious communication influences that were identified. The study proposes a framework to deepen the understanding of the types of brand avoidance affecting service brands.

    Research limitations/implications

    Since the different types of brand avoidance previously identified are also evident in a services environment, service providers should develop strategies to deal with the different types of service brand avoidance. The findings are broad in scope because of the exploratory nature of the study, and a detailed analysis of each type of service brand avoidance is still required.

    Originality/value

    This paper focuses on the various types of brand avoidance and their manifestation in the services context. The study contributes by showing that the broader concept of communication, not only advertising, should be considered when studying brand avoidance in a service context.

  • 3.
    Brunninge, Olof
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Media, Management and Transformation Centre (MMTC). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    Fridriksson, Helgi-Valur
    Malmö University.
    ”We have always been responsible”: A social memory approach to responsibility in supply chains2017In: European Business Review, ISSN 0955-534X, E-ISSN 1758-7107, Vol. 29, no 3, p. 372-383Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: Drawing on the social memory literature, we discuss what implications referencing to the past can have for how firms manage their supply chains and communicate about them.

    Design/Methodology/Approach: In a conceptual manner, we connect the field of responsible supply chain management to the growing literature on corporate heritage and social memory in organizations.

    Findings: We develop seven propositions related to the communication of the past and its connection to responsible supply chain management.

    Research limitations/implications: A social memory perspective can inform supply chain management research, by helping to better understand how and with what consequences the past can be used in communication about supply chains. Our paper is conceptual in nature and empirical investigations would be needed to support and/or modify our literature-based findings.

    Practical implications: Managers should be aware that both opportunities and risks are associated withcommunicating the past in connection to responsible supply chain management. Deployed in the right way, such communication can be valuable both in marketing and in internal management processes.

    Originality/value: This article introduces the social memory perspective to the supply chain management field and shows what implications it can have for research on responsibility in supply chains. 

  • 4.
    De Goey, Heleen
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management.
    Hilletofth, Per
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management.
    Eriksson, Lars
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design, JTH, Industrial design.
    Design-driven innovation: a systematic literature review2019In: European Business Review, ISSN 0955-534X, E-ISSN 1758-7107, Vol. 31, no 1, p. 92-114Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose

    The concept design-driven innovation focuses on innovating product meanings. It has been studied from a variety of perspectives and contexts since the early 2000s. However, a complete overview of the literature published in this area is currently missing. The purpose of this study is to provide a comprehensive understanding of how design-driven innovation contributes to value creation in product development.

    Design/methodology/approach

    In this systematic literature review, 57 papers and book chapters that cover design-driven innovation were identified and analyzed. An iterative coding process was followed to derive five facets of design-driven innovation that contribute to value creation.

    Findings

    Design-driven innovation creates value by focusing on the intangible values of products. The following five facets of design-driven innovation that contribute to value creation were identified: development of new product meanings, knowledge generation, actors and collaborations, capabilities and process. These facets and their interrelations are presented in a theoretical framework.

    Practical implications

    The main practical implication of this study is that it is now clear that the five facets of design-driven innovation are interrelated and reinforce each other. Therefore, companies need to approach design-driven innovation from a holistic perspective.

    Originality/value

    This paper contributes to theory by presenting the theoretical framework that provides an overview of available knowledge and that creates a context for future research.

  • 5.
    De Oliveira, Eider Arantes
    et al.
    Federal University of Uberlândia, Uberlândia, Brazil.
    Pimenta, Márcio Lopes
    Federal University of Uberlândia, Uberlândia, Brazil.
    Hilletofth, Per
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Industrial Production.
    Eriksson, David
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management.
    Integration through cross-functional teams in a service company2016In: European Business Review, ISSN 0955-534X, E-ISSN 1758-7107, Vol. 28, no 4, p. 405-430Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to characterize the internal dynamics of cross-functional teams (CFTs) in different organizational processes in a service company.

    Design/methodology/approach: A case study from a Brazilian service company was conducted. CFTs in five different organizational processes (strategy development, product development, portfolio management, sales channels management and business analysis) were analyzed through in-depth interviews, documents and non-participant observation.

    Findings: A framework with four pillars was constructed: constitution of the CFT, task drivers, behavior and attitudes of the team and personal motivators. It was possible to analyze the process of how a group acts and reacts under changing circumstances based on the pillars included in the framework.

    Research limitations/implications: The study is focused on creating analytical generalizability. Several insights in the 12 propositions presented in this study may be investigated in future research to validate the identified relationships among the pillars included in the framework. Moreover, the proposed framework allows the teams to be analyzed through a multidimensional view: structure, processes and impacts.

    Practical implications: If the semantic boundaries of the communication are not well delineated, the differences in understanding can generate manifest conflicts. Moreover, the workload in a CFT seems to be larger and more complex than working in a functional activity; however, members perceive that it reduces the risk of unemployment and increases motivation.

    Originality/value: The present study contributes to the extant literature with the proposal of a set of new exploratory propositions that can support future quantitative research about the use of CFTs in the service industry context.

  • 6.
    Eriksson, David
    University of Borås, Sweden.
    The role of moral disengagement in supply chain management research2016In: European Business Review, ISSN 0955-534X, E-ISSN 1758-7107, Vol. 28, no 3, p. 274-284Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose

    The study aims to explain the role of moral disengagement in supply chain management (SCM) research and the challenges that arise if the theory is used beyond its inherent limitations.

    Design/methodology/approach

    Conceptual paper based on how Bandura developed and used moral disengagement.

    Findings

    Moral disengagement can be used validly in SCM research. The theory should not to be applied to the supply chain itself, but SCM can be seen as an environment that is part of a reciprocal exchange, which shapes human behavior.

    Research limitations/implications

    The paper suggests a new theory for a better understanding of business ethics, corporate social responsibility and sustainability in SCM. Furthermore, the paper outlines how the theory should be used and some challenges that remain.

    Originality/value

    SCM researchers have shown how to apply a theory from psychology to SCM, which could progress to several areas of the research field. The paper also highlights an inconsistency in the use of the theory and explains how it should be used in SCM research.

  • 7.
    Eriksson, David
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management.
    Hilletofth, Per
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management.
    Foliated Networks to Analyze Moral Responsibility: A Conceptual Model2017In: European Business Review, ISSN 0955-534X, E-ISSN 1758-7107, Vol. 29, no 3, p. 360-371Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    urpose

    This study aims to explore how the flow of moral responsibility in supply chains can be understood through an analysis of material, monetary and information flows.

    Design/methodology/approach

    Social responsibility, foliated networks and morality are used to present a conceptual framework that suggests responsibility links in supply chains.

    Findings

    By understanding the flows of material, money and information, it is possible to see how different types (liable and political) of responsibility can be identified. Conventional supply chain flows are thus connected with moral responsibility.

    Research limitations/implications

    Responsibility issues in supply chain management need to include supply chain links created by monetary and information flows, as well as material flows.

    Practical implications

    Supply chain actors need to consider responsibility across their entire supply chain, which includes material, monetary and information flows.

    Originality/value

    Foliated transportation networks, moral disengagement and different types of responsibility are combined in a novel way to facilitate a better understanding of responsibility in supply chains.

  • 8.
    Eriksson, David
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management.
    Hilletofth, Per
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management.
    Guest editorial: Special issue on responsibility in supply chains2017In: European Business Review, ISSN 0955-534X, E-ISSN 1758-7107, Vol. 29, no 3, p. 258-260Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 9.
    Reitsma, Ewout
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management.
    Hilletofth, Per
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management.
    Critical success factors for ERP system implementation: A user perspective2018In: European Business Review, ISSN 0955-534X, E-ISSN 1758-7107, Vol. 30, no 3, p. 285-310Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate critical success factors (CSFs) for the implementation of an enterprise resource planning (ERP) system from a user perspective.

    Design/methodology/approach

    The research was conducted in two successive steps. First, a literature review was conducted to derive CSFs for ERP system implementation. Second, a survey was conducted to evaluate the importance of these CSFs from a user perspective. Data were collected through a questionnaire that was distributed within a German manufacturer and was developed based on the CSFs found in the literature. Gray relational analysis (GRA) was used to rank the CSFs in order of importance from a user perspective.

    Findings

    The findings reveal that users regard 11 of the 13 CSFs found in the literature as important for ERP system implementation. Seven of the CFSs were classified as the most important from a user perspective, namely, project team, technical possibilities, strategic decision-making, training and education, minimum customization, software testing and performance measurement. Users regarded 2 of the 13 CSFs as not important when implementing an ERP system, including organizational change management and top management involvement.

    Research limitations/implications

    One limitation of this study is that the respondents originate from one organization, industry and country. The findings may differ in other contexts, and thus, future research should be expanded to include more organizations, industries and countries. Another limitation is that this study only evaluates existing CSFs from a user perspective rather than identifying new ones and/or the underlying reasons using more qualitative research.

    Practical implications

    A better understanding of the user perspective toward CSFs for ERP system implementation promises to contribute to the design of more effective ERP systems, a more successful implementation and a more effective operation. When trying to successfully implement an ERP system, the project team may use the insights from the user perspective.

    Originality/value

    Even though researchers highlight the important role users play during ERP system implementation, their perspective toward the widely discussed CSFs for ERP system implementation has not been investigated comprehensively. This study aims to fill this gap by evaluating CSFs derived from the literature from a user perspective.

  • 10.
    Tsai, Chung-Ju
    et al.
    National Chung-Hsing University, Taichung, Taiwan.
    Lee, Tzong-Ru
    National Chung-Hsing University, Taichung, Taiwan.
    Yen, Szu-Wei
    Wufeng University, Chia-Yi, Taiwan.
    Hilletofth, Per
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Industrial Production.
    Operational process stages of brand alliances: A case study from the reinforcing bar and the construction industries2015In: European Business Review, ISSN 0955-534X, E-ISSN 1758-7107, Vol. 27, no 4, p. 389-408Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose– The purpose of this research is to investigate how companies in the reinforcing bar industry and the construction industry operate and implement brand alliances.

    Design/methodology/approach– This research uses a qualitative interview survey and the grounded theory method to extract key factors of brand alliance development and management in the targeted industries. The interview survey included six managers from different construction companies in Taiwan.

    Findings– This research identifies four common firm-level operational process stages (core categories) of brand alliances including different multidimensional factors, and proposes a conceptual model based on these identified core process stages. The four common core process stages include selection of brand alliance partners, communication with brand alliance partners, enforcement of brand alliances and assessment of brand alliances.

    Originality/value– The proposed model offers a tentative explanation of the development and management of brand alliances between the reinforcing bar industry and the construction industry. This study represents an initial research attempt in this field and explains how reinforcing bar and construction companies operate and implement brand alliances.

  • 11. Wictor, Ingemar
    The management of value chain activities in born global companiesIn: European Business Review, ISSN 0955-534X, E-ISSN 1758-7107Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 12.
    Wiesmann, Benedikt
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management.
    Snoei, Jochem Ronald
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management.
    Hilletofth, Per
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management.
    Eriksson, David
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management.
    Drivers and barriers to reshoring: A literature review on offshoring in reverse2017In: European Business Review, ISSN 0955-534X, E-ISSN 1758-7107, Vol. 29, no 1, p. 15-42Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose

    The purpose of this paper is to clarify the rather blurry concept of reshoring and its main drivers and barriers. At the same time, the paper seeks to provide a much-needed overview of the scientific theories used in previous research on reshoring.

    Design/methodology/approach

    The paper gathers information from previous published research. Data were collected through a systematic literature review on “reshoring” using primarily qualitative research techniques. Through a structured keyword search and subsequent elimination of papers, 22 peer-reviewed journal papers made it into the final review.

    Findings

    There is currently no consensus on the definition or “theory of reshoring”. Drivers and barriers could be grouped into five different sets of dynamics: global competitive dynamics, home country, host country, supply chain and firm-specific.

    Research limitations/implications

    Researchers need to consider the future development of the field and work toward an accepted terminology. Models about reshoring decisions need to include several decision criteria, which goes beyond financial metrics.

    Practical implications

    Practitioners need to carefully consider the decision to reshore as to not make rushed decisions. The final decision needs to consider factors such as quality, risk and brand reputation.

    Originality/value

    The paper is, to authors’ knowledge, the first overview of earlier research in a research journal. It provides a much-needed overview of an emerging field that can hold great importance for both future research and production. The constructed framework structures the dynamics (drivers and barriers) associated with reshoring.

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