Change search
Refine search result
1 - 15 of 15
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Axelsson, Anna Karin
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Granlund, Mats
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Wilder, Jenny
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Engagement in family activities: a quantitative, comparative study of children with profound intellectual and multiple disabilities and children with typical development2013In: Child Care Health and Development, ISSN 0305-1862, E-ISSN 1365-2214, Vol. 39, no 4, p. 523-534Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Participation is known to be of great importance for children's development and emotional well-being as well as for their families. In the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health – Children and Youth version participation is defined as a person's ‘involvement in a life situation’. Engagement is closely related to involvement and can be seen as expressions of involvement or degree of involvement within a situation. This study focuses on children's engagement in family activities; one group of families with a child with profound intellectual and multiple disabilities (PIMD) and one group of families with children with typical development (TD) were compared.

    Methods

    A descriptive study using questionnaires. Analyses were mainly performed by using Mann–Whitney U-test and Spearman's rank correlation test.

    Results

    Engagement in family activities differed in the two groups of children. The children with PIMD had a lower level of engagement in most family activities even though the activities that engaged the children to a higher or lesser extent were the same in both groups. Child engagement was found to correlate with family characteristics mostly in the children with TD and in the children with PIMD only negative correlations occurred. In the children with PIMD child engagement correlated with cognition in a high number of listed family activities and the children had a low engagement in routines in spite of these being frequently occurring activities.

    Conclusions

    Level of engagement in family activities in the group of children with PIMD was lower compared with that in the group of children with TD. Families with a child with PIMD spend much time and effort to adapt family living patterns to the child's functioning.

  • 2.
    Björkman, Berit
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Gimbler Berglund, Ingalill
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Enskär, Karin
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Biomedical Platform.
    Faresjö, Maria
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Biomedical Platform. Division of Medical Diagnostics, Region Jönköping County, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Huus, Karina
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Peri-radiographic guidelines for children with autism spectrum disorder: a nationwide survey in Sweden2017In: Child Care Health and Development, ISSN 0305-1862, E-ISSN 1365-2214, Vol. 43, no 1, p. 31-36Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: This study aimed to investigate the prevalence of guidelines and routines used nationwide when children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) are taken care of and examined in a radiology department during a peri-radiographic process.

    METHOD: A nationwide survey was compiled and distributed to 94 radiology departments throughout Sweden, i.e. those performing more than 100 000 radiographic examinations annually. The survey was designed as a web questionnaire with seven questions on possible guidelines and/or routines for the departments when preparing and taking care of children with ASD in conjunction with a radiographic procedure. The data were scrutinized, using descriptive statistics.

    RESULTS: In total, 86 radiology departments responded to the survey (response rate 92%). Of those departments, 40 did not examine children with ASD. None of the departments included in the study had existing guidelines underpinning the routines when preparing and performing radiographic examinations for children diagnosed with ASD. A few departments (n = 8) would set aside more time for the procedure if it were known in advance that the child to be examined had been diagnosed with ASD. Also, some departments (n = 7) had radiographers who were more experienced in the care of children who would be appointed to perform examinations for children with ASD.

    CONCLUSION: It is suggested that guidelines should be developed in order to increase interaction in a supportive way and decrease anxiety during the peri-radiographic process with children with ASD.

  • 3. Dada, S
    et al.
    Granlund, Mats
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Behavioural Science and Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Alant, E
    A discussion of individual variability, in activity-based interventions, using the niche concept2007In: Child Care Health and Development, ISSN 0305-1862, E-ISSN 1365-2214, Vol. 33, no 4, p. 424-431Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 4.
    Darcy, Laura
    et al.
    Institution of Health Science, University College Borås.
    Enskär, Karin
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Granlund, Mats
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Simeonsson, Rune J
    Petersson, Christina
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, The Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare.
    Björk, Maria
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Health and functioning in the everyday lives of young children with cancer: documenting with the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health - Children and Youth (ICF-CY).2015In: Child Care Health and Development, ISSN 0305-1862, E-ISSN 1365-2214, Vol. 41, no 3, p. 475-482Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Health care focus is shifting for children from surviving childhood cancer to living with it on a daily basis. There is a need to document health and function in the everyday lives of young children with cancer using the multidimensional framework and language of the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health - Children and Youth (ICF-CY).

    AIMS: The aims of this study were (1) to document health and functioning in the everyday lives of young children with cancer using ICF-CY codes and (2) to identify a comprehensive code set that can aid clinical assessment.

    METHOD: Interviews with children diagnosed with cancer and their parents, were transcribed, reviewed for content and coded to the ICF-CY using linking procedures.

    RESULTS: A comprehensive code set (n = 70) for childhood cancer was identified. The majority of content identified to codes was related to activity and participation describing social relations with family, peers and professionals, preschool attendance and play, as well as issues related to support and independence.

    CONCLUSIONS: The ICF-CY can be used to document the nature and range of characteristics and consequences of cancer experienced by children. The identified comprehensive code set could be helpful to health care professionals, parents and teachers in assessing and supporting young children's health and everyday life through the cancer trajectory. The comprehensive code set could be developed as a clinical assessment tool for those caring for young children with cancer. The universal language of the ICF-CY means that the utility of a clinical assessment tool based on identified codes can have wide reaching effects for the care of young children with cancer.

  • 5.
    Einberg, Eva-Lena
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Nygren, Jens
    School of Health and Welfare, Halmstad University, Halmstad, Sweden.
    Svedberg, Petra
    School of Health and Welfare, Halmstad University, Halmstad, Sweden.
    Enskär, Karin
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science.
    'Through my eyes': Health-promoting factors described by photographs taken by children with experience of cancer treatment2016In: Child Care Health and Development, ISSN 0305-1862, E-ISSN 1365-2214, Vol. 42, no 1, p. 76-86Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Health promotion for children with cancer should be based on the children's own needs and desires. Because there is a lack of knowledge in this area, the aim of this study was to explore what promotes health from the perspective of children with experience of cancer treatment.

    Methods

    Fifteen children between 8 and 12 years of age participated in focus groups with three children in each group. The children were given a camera and instructions to photograph subjects that promote their health. Focus group discussions were based on the photographs and the children's own description of those photographs. The analysis of focus group discussions and photographs was conducted using inductive content analysis.

    Results

    According to the children, health-promoting factors are defined as meaningful relationshipsrecreational activities and a trustful environment. Meaningful relationships include togetherness within the familyaffection for pets and friendship with peers. Recreational activities include engagement in play and leisurewithdrawal for relaxation and feeling enjoyment. Trustful environment includesconfidence in significant others and feeling safe.

    Conclusions

    Knowledge from this study can contribute to health promotion interventions and quality improvements in the health care of children with experience of cancer treatment. Children's experiences with what promotes health in their everyday lives provide a better understanding of the type of support children prefer when promoting their own health.

  • 6.
    Granlund, Mats
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Participation – challenges in conceptualization, measurement and intervention2013In: Child Care Health and Development, ISSN 0305-1862, E-ISSN 1365-2214, Vol. 39, no 4, p. 470-473Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 7.
    Green, Dido
    et al.
    Newcomen Centre, Guy's Hospital, London, United Kingdom.
    Baird, G.
    Sugden, D.
    A pilot study of psychopathology in Developmental Coordination Disorder2006In: Child Care Health and Development, ISSN 0305-1862, E-ISSN 1365-2214, Vol. 32, no 6, p. 741-750Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background:

    This paper explores the prevalence of emotional and behavioural disorders in children referred to a Community Paediatric Occupational Therapy service for assessment and treatment of problems with development of motor skills.

    Methods:

    Parents of 47 children from a clinical sample of children who had been identified with Developmental Coordination Disorder (DCD) returned the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire (SDQ) - a brief measure of the pro-social behaviour and psychopathology that can be completed by parents, teachers or youths.

    Results:

    Significant emotional and behavioural problems were reported by 29 parents (62%) with a further six (13%) reporting problems in the borderline range. Seven children (15%) were without significant problems in one or more area although only four of these (9%) were outside the borderline range for all of the sub-domains of the SDQ.

    Discussion:

    A significant proportion of children with DCD were reported by their parents to be at risk of psychopathology. Further research is needed to understand the relationship between motor difficulties and emotional and behavioural symptoms; however, it is recommended that interventions for children with DCD should support mental health and behavioural problems as well as motor development.

  • 8. Hammond, J.
    et al.
    Jones, V.
    Hill, E. L.
    Green, Dido
    Centre for Rehabilitation, Oxford Brookes University, Oxford, United Kingdom.
    Male, I.
    An investigation of the impact of regular use of the Wii Fit to improve motor and psychosocial outcomes in children with movement difficulties: A pilot study2014In: Child Care Health and Development, ISSN 0305-1862, E-ISSN 1365-2214, Vol. 40, no 2, p. 165-175Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background:

    Children with Developmental Co-ordination Disorder (DCD) experience poor motor and psychosocial outcomes. Interventions are often limited within the healthcare system, and little is known about how technology might be used within schools or homes to promote the motor skills and/or psychosocial development of these children. This study aimed to evaluate whether short, regular school-based sessions of movement experience using a commercially available home video game console (Nintendo's Wii Fit) would lead to benefits in both motor and psychosocial domains in children with DCD.

    Methods:

    A randomized crossover controlled trial of children with movement difficulties/DCD was conducted. Children were randomly assigned to an intervention (n = 10) or comparison (n = 8) group. The intervention group spent 10min thrice weekly for 1 month using Wii Fit during the lunch break, while the comparison group took part in their regular Jump Ahead programme. Pre- and post-intervention assessments considered motor proficiency, self-perceived ability and satisfaction and parental assessment of emotional and behavioural problems.

    Results:

    Significant gains were seen in motor proficiency, the child's perception of his/her motor ability and reported emotional well-being for many, but not all children.

    Conclusions:

    This study provides preliminary evidence to support the use of the Wii Fit within therapeutic programmes for children with movement difficulties. This simple, popular intervention represents a plausible method to support children's motor and psychosocial development. It is not possible from our data to say which children are most likely to benefit from such a programme and particularly what the dose and duration should be. Further research is required to inform across these and other questions regarding the implementation of virtual reality technologies in therapeutic services for children with movement difficulties.

  • 9.
    Huus, Karina
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Granlund, Mats
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Behavioural Science and Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Bornman, J.
    Centre for Augmentative and Alternative Communication, University of Pretoria, South Africa.
    Lygnegård, Frida
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Behavioural Science and Social Work.
    Human rights of children with intellectual disabilities: comparing self-ratings and proxy ratings2015In: Child Care Health and Development, ISSN 0305-1862, E-ISSN 1365-2214, Vol. 41, no 6, p. 1010-1017Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    A child rights-based approach to research articulates well with Article 12 of the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child (CRC) and highlights the importance and value of including children's own views about aspects that concern them. The aim of this study is to compare children with intellectual disability's own ratings (as self-raters) to those of their primary caregivers (as proxy raters) regarding human rights of children. The study also aims to establish whether there is an inter-rater agreement between the self-raters and proxy raters concerning Maslow's hierarchy of needs.

    Method

    This study is nested in a larger study examining the human rights of children with intellectual disability in South Africa. In total, 162 children with intellectual disability from 11 schools across three provinces and their primary caregivers participated by answering parts of a Children'sRightsQuestionnaire (CRQ) developed by the researchers based on the United Nation's CRC. We compared the answers for six questions in the questionnaire that were addressed to self-raters (children) and proxy raters (primary caregivers) in the same way.

    Results

    Questions regarding basic needs, such as access to clean water or whether the child had food to eat at home, were answered similarly by self-raters and proxy raters. Larger differences were found when self-raters and proxy raters were asked about whether the child had things or friends to play with at home. Socio-economic variables seemed to affect whether self-raters and proxy raters answered similarly.

    Conclusion

    The results underscore the importance of promoting children's rights to express themselves by considering the opinions of both the children as self-raters and their primary caregivers as proxy raters – not only the latter. The results indicate that it is especially important to include children's own voices when more complex needs are surveyed. Agreement between self- and proxy ratings could be affected by socio-economic circumstances.

  • 10. Janeslätt, Gunnel
    et al.
    Granlund, Mats
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Behavioural Science and Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Kottorp, A
    Development of a new assessment of time processing ability in children using Rasch analysis2008In: Child Care Health and Development, ISSN 0305-1862, E-ISSN 1365-2214, Vol. 34, no 6, p. 771-780Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 11.
    Ljusegren, Gunilla
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. CHILD.
    Johansson, I.
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science.
    Gimbler Berglund, Ingalill
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. CHILD.
    Enskär, Karin
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science.
    Nurses' experiences of caring for children in pain2012In: Child Care Health and Development, ISSN 0305-1862, E-ISSN 1365-2214, Vol. 38, no 4, p. 464-470Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim  To describe nurses' experiences when caring for children in pain.

    Background  Earlier studies have shown that nurses are key actors in pain management and that there is a need to focus on the nurses' own experiences of caring for children in pain.

    Method  Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 21 nurses at one paediatric clinic. The data were analysed by means of content analysis.

    Results  The interviews suggested that when a child's pain followed an expected pattern and they complied with treatment, the nurses trusted their knowledge and felt comfortable. On the other hand, in unpredictable situations the nurses felt fearful, powerless, abandoned and distrustful.

    Conclusion  The nurses were comfortable in predictable situations, but if a situation was unpredictable, they felt they had lost control over it.

    Implications for pain management  To reduce feelings of abandonment, work shifts should be organized so that more experienced nurses can work side by side with those who are less experienced. Pain assessment tools and guidelines for pain management should be introduced into the daily work, and systematic reflection should be used for nurses' professional development.

  • 12.
    Møller Christensen, Berit
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Björk, Maria
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Almqvist, Lena
    School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Mälardalen University, Västerås, Sweden.
    Huus, Karina
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Patterns of support to adolescents related to disability, family situation, harassment, and economy2019In: Child Care Health and Development, ISSN 0305-1862, E-ISSN 1365-2214Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    INTRODUCTION: Adolescents need support from family, friends, and teachers to increase their involvement in everyday life. Their environment and their own characteristics also influence their ability to participate in an everyday supportive environment.

    AIM: The aim of the study was to investigate patterns of support from parents, teachers, and very important persons such as peers to the ability of adolescents to participate in everyday life, as well as the importance of interpersonal relations as experienced by the adolescents.

    METHOD: The study has a cross-sectional design. The data compiled and analysed in this study are part of a longitudinal study of adolescents and their development into adults-LoRDIA (Longitudinal Research on Development In Adolescence). A combination of person- and variable-oriented design was used to capture patterns of support.

    RESULTS: Adolescents with a complicated home situation and low economic prerequisites who received little support from parents and friends participated to a lower degree in home activities. A substantial number of these adolescents had self-reported neurodevelopmental disorders and, as a group, were more often exposed to harassment. However, these adolescents participated to a higher extent in school activities, although they received little support from the teachers. The adolescents who received most support from parents and teachers were those with a country of origin other than Sweden and those who lived with both of their parents and had more siblings than average. However, this did not mean that they participated to a higher extent in home and school activities.

  • 13.
    Petersson, Christina
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, The Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Huus, Karina
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, The Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare.
    Åkesson, Karin
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, The Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Enskär, Karin
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Children's experiences about a structured assessment of health-related quality of life during a patient encounter2016In: Child Care Health and Development, ISSN 0305-1862, E-ISSN 1365-2214, Vol. 42, no 3, p. 424-432Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    It has been stated that care for children with chronic health conditions tends to focus on condition-specific issues rather than how these children experience their health and everyday life functioning.

    Aim

    The aim of this study was to explore children's experiences about a structured assessment of health-related quality of life applied during a patient encounter.

    Methods

    Prior to the start of the study, a clinical intervention based on the questionnaire DISABKIDS Chronic Generic Measure (DCGM-37) was performed. A qualitative explorative design was chosen, and 25 children between 10–17 years of age were interviewed after the consultation at four different paediatric outpatient clinics. Data were analysed according to qualitative content analysis.

    Results

    The results were twofold: children experienced that the assessment was providing them with insights about their health, which motivated them to make lifestyle changes. When outcomes were discussed and requested, the children felt encouraged.

    Conclusions

    The use of an assessment of health-related quality of life may promote insights about health and encourage children with chronic health conditions to discuss their outcomes with healthcare professionals.

  • 14.
    Taylor, Susan
    et al.
    Faculty of Computing Health and Science, Edith Cowan University, Perth, Australia.
    McLean, B.
    School of Paediatrics and Child Health, University of Western Australia, Perth, Australia.
    Falkmer, Torbjörn
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation. School of Occupational Therapy and Social work, Curtin University, Perth, Australia.
    Carey, L.
    Neurorehabilitation and Recovery, The Florey Institute of Neuroscience and Mental Health, Melbourne, Australia.
    Girdler, S.
    School of Occupational Therapy and Social work, Curtin University, Perth, Australia.
    Elliott, C.
    School of Occupational Therapy and Social work, Curtin University, Perth, Australia.
    Blair, E.
    Population Sciences, Telethon Kids Institute, Perth, Australia.
    Does somatosensation change with age in children and adolescents? A systematic review.2016In: Child Care Health and Development, ISSN 0305-1862, E-ISSN 1365-2214, Vol. 42, no 6, p. 809-824Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Somatosensory modalities, such as touch, proprioception and haptic ability, greatly influence the achievement of developmental milestones for children. Describing somatosensory impairment, natural variability and typical or expected developmental changes across age groups will help establish frameworks for intervention in clinical populations. This systematic review aimed to determine how different somatosensory modalities develop across childhood into adolescence to use as a point of reference for children at risk of somatosensory impairment.

    METHODS: Searches of five electronic databases were undertaken through EBSCO-host (MEDLINE, CINAHL, PsycINFO, SPORTDiscus and ERIC) for studies measuring at least one somatosensory modality in typically developing individuals between birth and 18 years and analysed by age. Characteristics of studies were collected including country of origin, sample size, demographics and outcome measure used. Quality assessment and data extraction were performed by two independent reviewers.

    RESULTS: Twenty three cross-sectional studies were included from a total of 188 articles retrieved: 8 examined aspects of touch, 5 proprioception and 10 haptic ability. Variability of study designs and variation in assessment tools precluded any formal meta-analysis.

    CONCLUSIONS: Somatosensation matures through childhood into adolescence; however, the present review found the pattern of somatosensory development varied depending on the assessment tool used and the aspect of somatosensation being measured, making it difficult to describe typical performance. There is a need for comprehensive assessment batteries to measure the somatosensation, including touch, proprioception and haptic ability, of children at risk of somatosensory impairment to aid in the development of effective interventions.

  • 15. Wilder, J
    et al.
    Granlund, Mats
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Behavioural Science and Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. CHILD.
    Behaviour style and interaction between seven children with multiple disabilities and their caregivers2003In: Child Care Health and Development, ISSN 0305-1862, E-ISSN 1365-2214, Vol. 29, no 6, p. 559-567Article in journal (Refereed)
1 - 15 of 15
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf