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  • 1.
    Björck-Åkesson, Eva
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Ferm, Ulrika
    Göteborg University, Sweden.
    Ahlsén, Elisabeth
    Göteborg University, Sweden.
    Conversational Topics Between a Child with Complex Communication Needs and her Caregiver at Mealtime2005In: Augmentative and Alternative Communication: AAC, ISSN 0743-4618, E-ISSN 1477-3848, Vol. 21, no 1, p. 19-41Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Naturalistic mealtime interactions between a child with complex communication needs and her caregiver (focus dyad) and a child without disabilities and her caregiver (comparison dyad) were investigated. An activity-based communication analysis was used to outline the contextual background factors of the dyads' activities, and the dyads' conversational topics were analyzed. For the child and her caregiver (the focus dyad), the natural mode of communication at mealtime was unaided. Communication mostly concerned immediate mealtime issues. Other, shorter, topics were introduced but were also anchored to immediate issues. In contrast, the child and caregiver who comprised the comparison dyad conversed about a variety of personal topics that extended beyond the present. Topic patterns are exemplified using discourse excerpts and are discussed in relation to aided communication and development.

  • 2.
    Fried-Oken, Melanie
    et al.
    Oregon Health & Science University, Portland, Oregon, USA.
    Granlund, Mats
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Behavioural Science and Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Guest editorial: AAC and ICF: A Good Fit to Emphasize Outcomes2012In: Augmentative and Alternative Communication: AAC, ISSN 0743-4618, E-ISSN 1477-3848, Vol. 28, no 1, p. 1-2Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 3.
    Granlund, Mats
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Behavioural Science and Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. CHILD.
    Björck-Åkesson, Eva
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Brodin, J
    Olsson, C
    Communication intervention for persons with profound disabilities: A Swedish perspective.1995In: Augmentative and Alternative Communication: AAC, ISSN 0743-4618, E-ISSN 1477-3848, no 1, p. 49-59Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 4.
    Granlund, Mats
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Behavioural Science and Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Björck-Åkesson, Eva
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Wilder, Jenny
    Mälardalen University.
    Ylvén, Regina
    AAC Interventions for Children in a Family Environment: Implementing Evidence in Practise2008In: Augmentative and Alternative Communication: AAC, ISSN 0743-4618, E-ISSN 1477-3848, Vol. 24, no 3, p. 207-219Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Interventions that focus on implementing augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) strategies and methods have been available to children in need of AAC and their families for at least 30 years. To date, most of the research that has considered AAC in family settings has been focused on gathering evidence of the effects of AAC interventions, rather than on implementing evidence-based strategies in everyday practice to improve outcomes. The purpose of this article is to discuss the research that has focused on parents as AAC interventionists, the family as a context for AAC intervention, and the effects of AAC interventions on children and other family members. The discussion is framed within the four steps associated with the process of knowledge translation: (a) deciding on desired outcomes of interventions, (b) evaluating evidence of the effectiveness of different AAC methods to obtain the desired outcomes, (c) translating the research evidence into everyday practice, and (d) implementing knowledge in practice.

     

  • 5.
    Granlund, Mats
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Behavioural Science and Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. CHILD.
    Olsson, C
    Efficacy of communication intervention for presymbolic communicators1999In: Augmentative and Alternative Communication: AAC, ISSN 0743-4618, E-ISSN 1477-3848, Vol. 15, no 1, p. 25-37Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 6.
    Granlund, Mats
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Behavioural Science and Social Work.
    Ström, E
    Olsson, C
    Iconicity and productive recall of a selcted sample of signs from signed swedish1989In: Augmentative and Alternative Communication: AAC, ISSN 0743-4618, E-ISSN 1477-3848, Vol. 5, no 3, p. 173-182Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 7.
    Johnson, Ensa
    et al.
    Centre for Augmentative and Alternative Communication, University of Pretoria, South Africa.
    Nilsson, Stefan
    CHILD, Institute of Health and Care Sciences, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Adolfsson, Margareta
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Eina! Ouch! Eish! Professionals’ perceptions of how children with cerebral palsy communicate about pain in South African school settings: Implications for the use of AAC2015In: Augmentative and Alternative Communication: AAC, ISSN 0743-4618, E-ISSN 1477-3848, Vol. 31, no 4, p. 325-335Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Most children with severe cerebral palsy experience daily pain that affects their school performance. School professionals need to assess pain in these children, who may also have communication difficulties, in order to pay attention to the pain and support the children’s continued participation in school. In this study, South African school professionals’ perceptions of how they observed pain in children with cerebral palsy, how they questioned them about it and how the children communicated their pain back to them were investigated. Thirty-eight school professionals participated in five focus groups. Their statements were categorized using qualitative content analysis. From the results it became clear that professionals observed children’s pain communication through their bodily expressions, behavioral changes, and verbal and non-verbal messages. Augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) methods were rarely used. The necessity of considering pain-related vocabulary in a multilingual South African context, and of advocating for the use of AAC strategies to enable children with cerebral palsy to communicate their pain was highlighted in this study.

  • 8.
    Klang, Nina
    et al.
    Department of Education, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Rowland, Charity
    Institute on Development and Disability, Oregon Health and Science University, Portland, OR, USA.
    Fried-Oken, Melanie
    Institute on Development and Disability, Oregon Health and Science University, Portland, OR, USA.
    Steiner, Sandra
    Institute on Development and Disability, Oregon Health and Science University, Portland, OR, USA.
    Granlund, Mats
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Behavioural Science and Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Adolfsson, Margareta
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    The content of goals in individual educational programs for students with complex communication needs2016In: Augmentative and Alternative Communication: AAC, ISSN 0743-4618, E-ISSN 1477-3848, Vol. 32, no 1, p. 41-48Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of the study was to explore the contents of communication-related goals in individualized education programs (IEPs) for students with complex communication needs. Goals in 43 IEPs were linked to the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health, Children and Youth version (ICFCY).

    The results show that the communication-related IEP goals contain information on multiple domains of functioning in the ICF-CY. However, judging by the amount of codes linked to ICF-CY chapters, the IEPs contain a relatively small proportion of goals that focus on interaction with others, or participation in classroom and leisure activities. Special education teachers and speech-language pathologists working with students with complex communication needs may need support to formulate communicationrelated IEP goals with a focus on interaction and participation in school activities.

  • 9.
    Pless, Mia
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Uppsala , Sweden.
    Granlund, Mats
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Implementation of the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) and the ICF Children and Youth Version (ICF-CY) within the context of augmentative and alternative communication2012In: Augmentative and Alternative Communication: AAC, ISSN 0743-4618, E-ISSN 1477-3848, Vol. 28, no 1, p. 11-20Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this article is to discuss the implementation of the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF), and the ICF version for Children and Youth (ICF-CY), within the context of augmentative and alternative communication (AAC). First, the use of the ICF and the ICF-CY in AAC research is analyzed. Second, examples of training and implementation of ICF from other contexts besides AAC are provided. Finally, we synthesize data to provide directions for future implementation of the ICF and ICF-CY in the field of AAC. We conclude that, within AAC, organizational routines and intervention documents need to be adapted to the universal language and classification framework of the ICF and ICF-CY. Furthermore, examples are needed to demonstrate how factors affect implementation at organizational and individual levels.

  • 10.
    Raghavendra, Pammi
    et al.
    Novita Children’s Services, Flinders University, and University of South Australia, Adelaide, Australia.
    Bornman, Juan
    University of Pretoria, South Africa.
    Granlund, Mats
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Behavioural Science and Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Björck-Åkesson, Eva
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    The World Health Organization's International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health: implications for clinical and research practice in the field of augmentative and alternative communication2007In: Augmentative and Alternative Communication: AAC, ISSN 0743-4618, E-ISSN 1477-3848, Vol. 23, no 4, p. 349-361Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In 2001, the World Health Organization (WHO) ratified and published a new classification system, the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF). There has been a varying amount of discussion and debate across the health and disability fields about what the ICF means and what it has to offer. However, there has been little discussion of its use and value in the field of augmentative and alternative communication (AAC). This article describes the earlier International Classification of Impairments, Disabilities, and Handicaps (ICIDH), upon which the current ICF was based; and outlines the ICF and the preliminary, derived Child and Youth version of the ICF (ICF-CY). The article also proposes what the ICF has to offer the AAC field, from both a clinical and research perspective; and concludes with a discussion of the advantages and challenges of using the ICF.

  • 11.
    Rowlands, Charity
    et al.
    Oregon Health & Science University, Portland, Oregon , USA.
    Fried-Oken, Melanie
    Oregon Health & Science University, Portland, Oregon , USA.
    Steiner, Sam
    Oregon Health & Science University, Portland, Oregon , USA.
    Lollar, Donald
    Oregon Health & Science University, Portland, Oregon , USA.
    Phelps, Randall
    Oregon Health & Science University, Portland, Oregon , USA.
    Simeonsson, Rune J.
    University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, North Carolina , USA.
    Granlund, Mats
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Developing the ICF-CY for AAC profile and code set for children who rely on AAC2012In: Augmentative and Alternative Communication: AAC, ISSN 0743-4618, E-ISSN 1477-3848, Vol. 28, no 1, p. 21-32Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We describe the ICF-CY for AAC Profile, a tool to integrate information about the multiple factors affecting communication skill development and use in school-aged children with complex communication needs. The Profile uses the World Health Organization’s International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health − Children & Youth Version (WHO, 2007) as its framework. We propose that the ICF-CY for AAC Profile constitutes a code set for AAC users and discuss the iterative process of code-set development. The Profile is one component of a proposed process to guide the development of educational goals for children in Grades kindergarten-12 who currently or potentially rely on AAC.

  • 12.
    Simeonsson, Rune
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Björck-Åkesson, Eva
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Lollar, Donald J.
    Communication, Disability, and the ICF-CY2012In: Augmentative and Alternative Communication: AAC, ISSN 0743-4618, E-ISSN 1477-3848, Vol. 28, no 1, p. 3-10Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The child’s interactions with persons in the proximal environment constitute the context for development of communication. Within early close relationships, the child acquires communication skills; developmental outcomes are defined by the continuous dynamic interactions of the child, the experiences provided by the family and close environment, and the use of different means of augmentative and alternative communication (AAC). Communication problems manifest in a variety of ways and at different levels of severity. The nature of problems differs as a function of the child’s age and diagnosed condition, the communication skills of interaction partners, and the availability of communication aids. The focus for assessment and intervention may be the child, the family, the close environment and/or the interactions between them. Clarifying these varied functions and environmental factors is crucial for appropriate assessment and provision of augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) interventions. This paper reviews issues in assessment and intervention for children in need of AAC and presents the World Health Organizations’ (WHO) International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health version for Children and Youth (ICF-CY) as a tool to enhance assessment and intervention in the AAC field. Read 

1 - 12 of 12
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