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  • 1.
    Olsson, Tobias
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Media and communication science.
    Hjorth, Malin
    Linnéuniversitetet.
    For Mainstream and Alternative Activism: A Comparative Look at How Young Activists Navigate within the Converging Media World2009In: Merz: medien+erziehung, ISSN 0176-4918, no 6.09, p. 48-56Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 2.
    Sundin, Ebba
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Media and communication science.
    From billboards to tablets: the news context and its role as a part of the political socialization2013In: Merz: medien+erziehung, ISSN 0176-4918, Vol. 57, no 6, p. 44-52Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    With a changing media landscape, one might ask how the tradition of studying media’s role in the complex process of political socialization can be pushed forward to match the meanings of these changes of integrated interpersonal and media communication forms. In this article, the overall aim is to discuss how to approach the research field of political socialization connected to the news content in all different forms of channels that are part of today’s media worlds of children and adolescents. The reason for this discussion is the belief of the continuing importance of gaining knowledge of news media’s role in the political socialization process of children and adolescents. Also, the question is to address if it might be useful to re-connect with the basic ideas of political socialization and frame the ideas in a model with the contemporary concepts of ‘digitization’, ‘mediatization’, ‘glocalization’ and globalization.

  • 3.
    Svensson, Anders
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Media and communication science.
    Vimarlund, Vivian
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Informatics.
    Gäre, Klas
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Informatics.
    Online Participation with Obstacles: Non-Willingness to Become Facebook fans of a Health-Promoting Web Site2011In: Merz: medien+erziehung, ISSN 0176-4918, no 6, p. 70-80Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Within dominant branches of contemporary research and public debate, applications like Facebook and Twitter are perceived as social media for user participation. Technical possibilities and socio cultural restrictions for user involvement are identified and discussed. Common to both perspectives is that users’ willingness to participate tends to be taken for granted. By studying a case where the users’ response indicates weak willingness to participate, despite the website producers’ efforts to offer social media for participation, this article wish to contribute to a better understanding of the conditions for online participation on the so-called social Web.

    UMO is a very popular Swedish health promoting website intended for offering adolescents knowledge and advisory service on sexual, reproductive and psychical health. In 2010 UMO extended the use of social media by opening a Facebook fan page. One of the reasons was to attract new segments of the target audience, another was to make adolescents become fans. More than a year after the start, none of this have developed in accordance with the intentions and expectations. Analyses of data, gained from a content analysis of UMO’s Facebook fan page besides completing interviews with the administrator of the fan page and adolescent users of UMO, indicates a whole set of possible explanations for UMO’s shortcomings.

    The study shows on yet another problem with uncritically asserting that the new Web 2.0 and social media benefit participation. What has been overlooked is that obstacles to participation might as well be sought from the participants themselves, and be an active choice by the audience. The bottom line is that mediatization does not describe a fait accompli, and that socio-cultural change in its wake in no way is universal, but rather is characterized by a set of particularities.

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