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  • 1.
    Bertills, Karin
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Granlund, Mats
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. SALVE (Social challenges, Actors, Living conditions, reseach VEnue).
    Augustine, Lilly
    School of Education and Environment, Kristianstad university, Kristianstad, Sweden.
    Measuring self-efficacy, aptitude to participate and functioning in students with and without impairments2018In: European Journal of Special Needs Education, ISSN 0885-6257, E-ISSN 1469-591X, Vol. 33, no 4, p. 572-583Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Including vulnerable groups of students such as students with learning disabilities in mainstream school research, require ethical considerations and questionnaire adaptation. These students are often excluded, due to low understanding or methodologies generating inadequate data. Students with disability need be studied as a separate group and provided accessible questionnaires. This pilot study aims at developing and evaluating student self-reported measures, rating aspects of student experiences of school-based Physical Education (PE). Instrument design, reliability and validity were examined in Swedish secondary school students (n = 47) including students, aged 13, with intellectual disability (n = 5) and without impairment and test–retested on 28 of these students. Psychometric results from the small pilot-study sample were confirmed in analyses based on replies from the first wave of data collection in the main study (n = 450). Results show adequate internal consistency, factor structure and relations between measures. In conclusion, reliability and validity were satisfactory in scales to measure self-efficacy in general, in PE, and aptitude to participate. Adapting proxy ratings for functioning into self-reports indicated problems. Adequacy of adjustments made were confirmed and a dichotomous scale for typical/atypical function is suggested for further analyses.

  • 2.
    Garrels, Veerle
    et al.
    Department of Special Needs Education, faculty of Educational Sciences, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway.
    Granlund, Mats
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Social Work. Department of Special Needs Education, faculty of Educational Sciences, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway.
    Measuring self-determination in Norwegian students: adaptation and validation of the AIR Self-Determination Scale2018In: European Journal of Special Needs Education, ISSN 0885-6257, E-ISSN 1469-591X, Vol. 33, no 4, p. 466-480Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study describes the adaptation and validation of the American Institute for Research (AIR) Self-Determination Scale for use in Norwegian research and education. The study contributes to the field by enabling reliable assessment of self-determination of Norwegian students with intellectual disability. The operational equivalence of the construct of self-determination in American and Norwegian culture were examined. The article further describes the adaptations that were made to the scale to ensure its fitness for intended use. Psychometric reliability (Cronbach's α and test-retest reliability) was tested on 121 students, and the underlying structure of the scale was examined by means of principal component analysis. The adapted version of the questionnaire (AIR-S-NOR) shows respectable psychometric properties. Suggestions for how the AIR-S-NOR can be used in future research and educational practices are presented.

  • 3.
    Granlund, Mats
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Behavioural Science and Social Work.
    Staff in-service training on intervention with persons with impairment1991In: European Journal of Special Needs Education, ISSN 0885-6257, E-ISSN 1469-591X, Vol. 6, no 3, p. 165-176Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 4.
    Granlund, Mats
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Behavioural Science and Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. CHILD.
    Roll-Pettersson, L
    The perceived needs of support of parents and classroom teachers: a comparison of needs in two microsystems2001In: European Journal of Special Needs Education, ISSN 0885-6257, E-ISSN 1469-591X, Vol. 16, no 3, p. 225-244Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 5.
    Granlund, Mats
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Behavioural Science and Social Work.
    Terneby, J
    Olsson, C
    Creating communicative opportunities through a combined in-service training and supervision package1992In: European Journal of Special Needs Education, ISSN 0885-6257, E-ISSN 1469-591X, Vol. 7, no 3, p. 229-252Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 6.
    Göransson, Kerstin
    et al.
    School of Education, Culture and Communication, Mälardalen University, Västerås.
    Malmqvist, Johan
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Nilholm, Claes
    Faculty of Education and Society, Malmö University, Malmö.
    Local school ideologies and inclusion: the case of Swedish independent schools2013In: European Journal of Special Needs Education, ISSN 0885-6257, E-ISSN 1469-591X, Vol. 28, no 1, p. 49-63Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper reports on the development of a framework for the classification of local school ideologies in relation to inclusion that provides a tool for classifying the general educational direction as well as work with pupils in need of special support of individual schools. The framework defines different aspects of local school ideology in terms of values related to the societal level, school level, and individual level of the education system. The paper also reports on a study exploring variations among Swedish independent schools, concerning local school ideology using the framework as a theoretical tool. In this qualitative analysis, eight schools were selected from results of a questionnaire to all Swedish independent schools (return rate 79.5%) for further analysis based on interviews with different categories of school personnel, parents, and pupils. Five different patterns of local school ideologies were found more or less in line with values of inclusion, e.g. the holistic – inclusive and the market oriented – exclusive. Results are discussed in relation to the multiple and sometimes competing objectives that every school has to deal with and make priorities between. Implications for pupils in need of special support in a school system rapidly undergoing marketisation are finally discussed. 

  • 7.
    Karlsson, Maria
    et al.
    School of Education, Culture and Communication, Mälardalen University, Sweden.
    Björck-Åkesson, Eva
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Granlund, Mats
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Behavioural Science and Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Changing services to children with disabilities and their families through in-service training: is the organisation affected?2008In: European Journal of Special Needs Education, ISSN 0885-6257, E-ISSN 1469-591X, Vol. 23, no 3, p. 207-222Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Professional development in family‐centred services was given to professionals supporting children with disabilities and their families with the purpose to influence ways to perform working tasks. Is it possible to change ways of working through in‐service training? In order to find answers to that question perceptions of in‐service training at different organisational levels were collected by interviews. Ways to perform working tasks were investigated by self‐reported ratings on questionnaires. What kind of change the teams experienced was analysed through written assignments at the end of professional development. The study builds on a longitudinal design. Watzlawick and co‐workers identified orders of change to analyse perceptions of, and changes following, professional development. The findings reveal that participants at different levels of the organisation have similar perceptions of the in‐service training. They are described more in depth by participants within the organisation, rather than the ones outside (parents and managers), who describe the consequences of the professional development rather than the professional development process. After professional development, the family approach has been adopted among most professionals; for example, are assessment tools and model for habilitation plans which were presented in the professional development used afterwards in everyday work? This implies a second‐order change. However, some professionals do claim that the family‐centred way of working is nothing new to them, which corresponds to a first‐order change. Professional development in conjunction with resources for implementing change after professional development are therefore seen as factors that facilitate second‐order change.

  • 8.
    Klang, Nina
    et al.
    Department of Education, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Gustafsson, Katarina
    Department of Education, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Möllås, Gunvie
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Learning Practices inside and outside School (LPS), Communication, Culture & Diversity @ JU (CCD@JU).
    Nilholm, Claes
    Department of Education, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Göransson, Kerstin
    Department of Pedagogical Studies, Karlstad University, Karlstad, Sweden.
    Enacting the role of special needs educator – six Swedish case studies2017In: European Journal of Special Needs Education, ISSN 0885-6257, E-ISSN 1469-591X, Vol. 32, no 3, p. 391-405Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    With the increasing focus on inclusion, special needs educators (SNEs) are now expected to share responsibility for pupils with teacher colleagues and to lead school development, but it is a challenge to enact this role in schools. The aim of the study was to explore how professional roles of Swedish SNEs are enacted in local school contexts. From a survey of SNEs in 10 Swedish municipalities, six participants whose work tasks were expected to correspond to the degree ordinances for their university training were chosen. The participants were followed at work, and data were collected through observation of the participants at work, participants’ diaries and interviews with the participants, their teacher colleagues and their school principals. The analysis involved both quantitative and qualitative methods. First, based on the researchers’ observations of the participants at work, categories of SNEs’ tasks were discerned, and the amount of time devoted to those categories of tasks was summarised. Second, case study narratives of the SNEs’ work were constructed to describe how the participants, their teacher colleagues and their school principals view the SNE role and to describe how the work is enacted in various school contexts. The results revealed seven categories of work tasks practised to varying degrees by the six SNEs. The case study narratives exposed large variation in how the SNEs conceptualised their role and how it evolved in relation to local school contexts. The results of the study are discussed with regard to the role of the SNE in relation to policies of inclusion.

  • 9.
    Lidström, Helene
    et al.
    Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Granlund, Mats
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Behavioural Science and Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Hemmingsson, Helena
    Linköping University.
    Use of ICT in school: a comparison between students with and without physical disabilities2012In: European Journal of Special Needs Education, ISSN 0885-6257, E-ISSN 1469-591X, Vol. 27, no 1, p. 21-37Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to determine the information and communication technologies use in school activities of two groups of students with physical disabilities, comprised of those who did and those who did not use a computer-based assistive technology device (ATD) and to make a comparison with students from the general population. In addition, positive factors associated with in-school computer use are identified for students with physical disabilities. The method adopted was a cross-sectional survey about computer-based activities in school among students with physical disabilities (n = 287); including those who used (n = 127) and those who did not use (n  = 160) a computer-based ATD in school (mean age 13 years 6 months). Group comparisons were made with students from the general population (n  = 940). The results showed that the most frequent computer users were students with physical disabilities, who used a computer-based ATD daily. However, when considered as a group, students with physical disabilities used the computer for less varied educational activities than the reference group. Four factors had a positive association to ‘participation in computer activities in school’ for students with physical disabilities: attending a mainstream school, the students’ age (notably, being 16–18 years old), using a computer often in school, and the teachers using a computer frequently in teaching. The present study concludes that, regardless of whether they use a computer-based ATD or not, students with a physical disability have restricted participation in some computer-based educational activities in comparison to students from the general population. An individual plan could be beneficial for each student to: focus on the aim of the computer use; examine the students’ needs in terms of computer-based ATDs and their inclusion in education; and ensure that the students’ digital skills are fully utilised.

  • 10.
    Lindqvist, Gunilla
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Disciplinary Research. Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, School Based Research, Other School Based Research.
    Nilholm, Claes
    Malmö University.
    Promoting inclusion? ‘Inclusive’ and effective head teachers’ descriptions of their work2014In: European Journal of Special Needs Education, ISSN 0885-6257, E-ISSN 1469-591X, Vol. 29, no 1, p. 74-90Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of the reported interview study from Sweden is to contribute to our understanding of how head teachers can promote inclusive practices. Five head teachers were selected from a larger sample of head teachers working in compulsory schools (6–16) according to specific criteria in order to obtain head teachers who work effectively and express inclusive values relative to a relational perspective. The interviews were semi-structured, and a thematic analysis was performed. Head teachers’ strategies were in focus. The theoretical point of departure is critical pragmatism. Overall the five head teachers reported similar strategies. The head teachers describe the importance of educational leadership through observation and participation in activities in the classrooms. They advocate flexibility in the solutions provided for students in need of special support preferring solutions carried out in the regular classroom by the class/subject teacher. Head teachers see special educational needs coordinators (SENCOs) as important partners in their work towards more inclusive practices. Head teachers express the importance of consensus among their staff. They seem to welcome government’s increasing demands and steering concerning how head teachers should manage their schools. Finally, it is discussed whether the head teachers can be said to work ‘inclusively’ and, more generally, the methodological challenges researchers must confront in studies concerning ‘inclusive’ education.

  • 11.
    Lindqvist, Gunilla
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Disciplinary Research.
    Nilholm, Claes
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Disciplinary Research.
    Almqvist, Lena
    Mälardalens högskola.
    Wetso, Gun-Marie
    Högskolan Dalarna.
    Different agendas? The views of different occupational groups on special needs education2011In: European Journal of Special Needs Education, ISSN 0885-6257, E-ISSN 1469-591X, Vol. 26, no 2, p. 143-157Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of the present paper is to investigate how different occupational groups explain why children have problems in school, how they believe schools should help these children and the role they believe that special educational needs coordinators (SENCOs) should have in such work. A questionnaire was distributed to all teaching and support staff in a Swedish municipality (N=1297). As a result, 938 persons (72.5%) answered the questionnaire. The answers given by (a) preschool teachers (b) teacher assistants (c) SENCOs (d) special teachers (e) class teachers and (f) subject teachers were compared. Several interesting patterns emerged from the data indicating that the occupational groups to a large extent have different ideas concerning how the school should work with children in need of special support. The SENCOs were, for example, the only group that believed that they should be involved in school development. The outcome of the study is discussed in relation to the notion of inclusive education.

  • 12.
    Maxwell, Gregor
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Granlund, Mats
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    How are conditions for participation expressed in education policy documents?: A review of documents in Scotland and Sweden2011In: European Journal of Special Needs Education, ISSN 0885-6257, E-ISSN 1469-591X, Vol. 26, no 2, p. 251-272Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study approaches inclusive schools by looking at how conditions for participation are expressed for pupils with additional support needs in education policy documents in Sweden and Scotland. By using five dimensions of the environment – availability, accessibility, affordability, accommodability, and acceptability – expressions of conditions for participation are explored in 41 documents. This is done in a vertical manner by analysing national laws, regional policy documents, and local-level documents which directly influence classroom practices. A deductive content analysis approach using a protocol based on the five environmental dimensions is used to extract information and identify meaning units. In the meaning units meaningful concepts are identified and linked to ICF-CY categories. These are used as reference points. It is suggested, from the documents analysed, that conditions for participation are easy to express as available, accessible opportunities, or affordability issues, but not as involvement experiences linked to accommodations made and acceptability issues within a context. Documents in Scotland and Sweden also have different foci in terms of conditions for participation.

  • 13.
    Nilholm, Claes
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Disciplinary Research.
    Special education, inclusion and democracy2006In: European Journal of Special Needs Education, ISSN 0885-6257, E-ISSN 1469-591X, Vol. 21, no 4, p. 431-445Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 14.
    Nilholm, Claes
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Disciplinary Research.
    Alm, Barbro
    Örebro Universitet.
    An inclusive classroom? A case study of inclusiveness, teacher strategies, and children's experiences2010In: European Journal of Special Needs Education, ISSN 0885-6257, E-ISSN 1469-591X, Vol. 25, no 3, p. 239-252Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A case study of what appears to be an inclusive classroom in Sweden is reported. The group of children in the class studied was very heterogeneous: five of the 15 children had a disability diagnosis at the time of the study. One aim of the study was to develop a methodology which can be used in order to investigate in what sense classrooms are 'inclusive', especially as regards the point of view of the pupils. It is argued that an explicit definition of characteristics of inclusive classrooms and clear-cut methods to study those characteristics are necessary prerequisites in order to reach valid conclusions concerning what teaching strategies are central to inclusive processes. The data consist of interviews with the teachers and children involved, sociograms, a questionnaire answered by the children, notes from participant observations and poetry by the children. The analyses suggest that the classroom seems to be inclusive, although it is emphasised that this is not an all-or-none phenomenon, especially children's experiences are complex phenomena. It is argued that the teachers try to create a learning community where differences are valued. Six teacher strategies emerged from the data.

  • 15.
    Olsson, Lena M.
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Behavioural Science and Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Elgmark, Elisabeth
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Granlund, Mats
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Behavioural Science and Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Huus, Karina
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Social service utilisation patterns among children with mild intellectual disability – differences between children integrated into mainstream classes and children in self-contained classes2015In: European Journal of Special Needs Education, ISSN 0885-6257, E-ISSN 1469-591X, Vol. 30, no 2, p. 220-236Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background. Children with a mild intellectual disability (ID) and their families often require social services; however, because of the characteristics of the formal service system, these families may be at risk of not receiving necessary services. The aim of this study was to obtain knowledge regarding the types and number of services that families receive from social services because of the child’s disability and because of social problems. Another aim was to acquire knowledge regarding the percentage of families receiving services and to evaluate the received services in relation to the child’s gender, school setting and age. Method. Utilisation of social services among 84 children with a mild ID and their families in two municipalities in Sweden was examined using existing social services records. Results. Approximately one-third of the families received services because of the child’s disability and one-fourth because of social problems. Children integrated into mainstream classes were significantly less likely to receive services from social services because of their disability than children in self-contained classes. The most commonly utilised services because of the child’s disability were companion service, short period of supervision for schoolchildren and special transportation services. The services most utilised because of social problems were help from a personal contact, a contact family for the child’s siblings and financial assistance for the child’s parents. Conclusions. Social services must engage in outreach activities, especially in schools, so that families having a child with mild ID are recognised and receive necessary services.

  • 16. Sandström-Kjellin, M
    et al.
    Granlund, Mats
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Behavioural Science and Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Children's engagement in different classroom activities2006In: European Journal of Special Needs Education, ISSN 0885-6257, E-ISSN 1469-591X, Vol. 21, no 3, p. 285-300Article in journal (Refereed)
1 - 16 of 16
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