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  • 1. Baelum, V
    et al.
    van Palenstein Helderman, W
    Hugoson, Anders
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Oral health.
    Yee, R
    Fejerskov, O
    A global perspective on changes in the burden of caries and periodontitis: implications for dentistry.2007In: Journal of Oral Rehabilitation, ISSN 0305-182X, E-ISSN 1365-2842, Vol. 34, no 12, p. 872-906; discussion 940Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The structure and contents of most oral health care systems and the contents of dental curricula reflect a deep-rooted tradition for attempting to cure oral diseases by refined technological means. However, better oral health conditions for the world's populations necessitate the application of up-to-date scientific knowledge to control the major oral diseases. This review points out that not only should the structure and contents of oral health care delivery systems be based on state-of-the-art knowledge about the biology of the oral diseases; they must also take into account the trends for change in caries and periodontal diseases within and between populations, and acknowledge the impact of changes in treatment philosophies for these trends. The oral disease profiles for populations in low- and high-income countries are briefly described, and it is concluded that the rapidly changing disease profiles observed in high-income countries necessitate re-thinking of the future role and organization of dentistry in such countries. The priorities for low- and middle-income countries must be to avoid repeating the mistakes made in the high-income countries. Instead, these societies might take advantage of setting priorities based on a population-based common risk factor approach. If such an approach is adopted, the training of personnel with oral health care competence must be rethought. The authors suggest three different cadres of dental care providers to be considered for an approach that allows health care planners in different populations around the world to prioritize appropriate oral health care with due respect for the socio-economic conditions prevailing.

  • 2. Bergman, B
    et al.
    Hugoson, Anders
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Oral health.
    Olsson, C O
    A 25 year longitudinal study of patients treated with removable partial dentures.1995In: Journal of Oral Rehabilitation, ISSN 0305-182X, E-ISSN 1365-2842, Vol. 22, no 8, p. 595-599Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A 25 year longitudinal study was carried out on a number of patients fitted with removable partial dentures (RPDs) in 1969. Before the prosthetic treatment all patients were given oral hygiene motivation and instructions in order to create a high level of co-operation. The RPDs, most of which were lower bilateral distal extension dentures, were carefully planned and designed. During the first 10 years the patients were examined in our clinic at yearly intervals at which time encouragement and reinstruction regarding oral hygiene were given and various treatment procedures were performed as required. After the initial 10 years the patients were advised, for practical reasons, to continue to have yearly controls on their own initiative. Of the initial 30 patients from 1969, 23 were still alive in 1994, all of whom were examined. In five of those 23 the original RPD situation had changed more or less due mainly to general illness contracted and/or change to other therapies. In the remaining 18 patients wearing in total 20 RPDs, 13 (65%) of the original RPDs were still functioning. Seven RPDs were new with principally the same design as the original ones. Among these 18 patients the number of lost teeth, the number of new DF surfaces and the increased number of endodontically treated teeth were few. No apparent changes took place regarding the periodontal condition during the follow-up period.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  • 3. Carlsson, G E
    et al.
    Magnusson, Tomas
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Oral health.
    Egermark, I
    Prediction of demand for treatment of temporomandibular disorders based on a 20-year follow-up study.2004In: Journal of Oral Rehabilitation, ISSN 0305-182X, E-ISSN 1365-2842, Vol. 31, no 6, p. 511-517Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 4.
    Lindfors, Erik
    et al.
    Department of Stomatognathic Physiology, Public Dental Health Service, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Magnusson, Tomas
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Centre for Oral Health.
    Ernberg, Malin
    Department of Dental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Scandinavian Center for Orofacial Neurosciences, Huddinge, Sweden.
    Patients' experiences of therapeutic jaw exercises in the treatment of masticatory myofascial pain-A postal questionnaire study2019In: Journal of Oral Rehabilitation, ISSN 0305-182X, E-ISSN 1365-2842, Vol. 46, no 9, p. 800-806Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: The most common non-dental pain in the orofacial region is pain associated with temporomandibular disorders (TMD), and jaw exercises are a common treatment in these cases. Since masticatory myofascial pain has components of an affective and cognitive nature, knowledge about the patients' experiences of the condition and treatment is important.

    OBJECTIVE: The aim was to study the patients' experiences of jaw exercises in the treatment of masticatory myofascial pain.

    METHODS: A questionnaire, containing 24 statements that should be answered according to a five-item verbal Likert scale, was sent to 150 consecutive patients with masticatory myofascial pain according to the Research Diagnostic Criteria for TMD after they had been treated with jaw exercises for 3-12 months.

    RESULTS: The response rate was 73% (n = 109), and 79% of the responders were women. 71% of the patients reported that it was easier to remember the jaw exercises if they put them in conjunction with an already established routine. Before examination, 49% of the patients suspected serious disease behind their symptoms, but these concerns were greatly relieved by the information provided. As a result, 78% reported that information about the underlying cause of their symptoms made them more involved in the treatment. Finally, 72% of the respondents reported that the jaw exercises were effective in reducing their symptoms.

    CONCLUSIONS: Information about the cause of the symptoms and the treatment is important to reassure and make the patient involved in the treatment. Most patients report that jaw exercises are an effective treatment and they appreciated to have tools to tackle the problems themselves if the symptoms should return.

  • 5.
    Magnusson, Tomas
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine.
    List, T
    Helkimo, M
    Self-assessment of pain and discomfort in patients with temporomandibular disorders: a comparison of five different scales with respect to their precision and sensitivity as well as their capacity to register memory of pain and discomfort.1995In: Journal of Oral Rehabilitation, ISSN 0305-182X, E-ISSN 1365-2842, Vol. 22, no 8, p. 549-556Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 6. Rosa, V.L.M
    et al.
    Yasuda, M Y
    Guimares, A
    Magnusson, C
    Magnusson, T
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Oral health.
    Correlation between macroscopic findings and CT images in human temporomandibular joints.2010In: Journal of Oral Rehabilitation, ISSN 0305-182X, E-ISSN 1365-2842, Vol. 38, p. 14-Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 7. Zulqarnain, B J
    et al.
    Furuya, R
    Hedegård, B
    Magnusson, Tomas
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine.
    The silent period in the masseter and the anterior temporalis muscles in adult patients with mild or moderate mandibular dysfunction symptoms.1989In: Journal of Oral Rehabilitation, ISSN 0305-182X, E-ISSN 1365-2842, Vol. 16, no 2, p. 127-137Article in journal (Refereed)
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