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  • 1. Alm, Anita
    et al.
    Fåhraeus, Christina
    Wendt, Lill-Kari
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Oral health.
    Koch, Göran
    Andersson-Gäre, Boel
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Quality improvements, innovations and leadership in health care and social work.
    Birkhed, Dowen
    Body adiposity status in teenagers and snacking habits in early childhood in relation to approximal caries at 15 years of age2008In: International Journal of Paediatric Dentistry, ISSN 0960-7439, E-ISSN 1365-263X, Vol. 18, no 3, p. 189-196Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: The prevalence of overweight and obesity in children is steadily increasing in many countries. Dental caries and obesity are both multifactorial diseases and are associated with dietary habits.

    OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between body weight status in adolescents and snacking habits in early childhood to approximal caries prevalence at 15 years of age.

    METHODS: This study is part of a series of surveys of oral health in children followed from the ages of 1 year to 15 years. Body adiposity status was estimated at 13.5-16.4 years using the International Obesity Task Force cut-off values [age-specific body mass index (isoBMI)]. Information about snacking habits in early childhood was collected from interviews conducted at 1 year and 3 years. Approximal caries information was obtained from bitewing radiographs at 15 years. Data related to isoBMI and approximal caries were available in 402 teenagers.

    RESULT: Adolescents with isoBMI > or = 25 (n = 64) had an approximal caries prevalence that was a mean of 1.6 times higher than those with isoBMI < 25 (n = 338) (4.64 vs. 2.94; P = 0.014). Furthermore, children's snacking habits at an early age were associated with approximal caries at 15 years.

    CONCLUSION: Overweight and obese adolescents had more approximal caries than normal-weight individuals. Moreover, the frequent consumption of snacking products during early childhood appears to be a risk indicator for caries at 15 years. Future preventive programmes should therefore include, on a multidisciplinary level, strategies to prevent and reduce both obesity and dental caries at an early age.

  • 2.
    Bergendal, Birgitta
    et al.
    Odontologiska Institutionen i Jönköping.
    Norderyd, Johanna
    Odontologiska Institutionen i Jönköping.
    Bågesund, Mats
    Center for Orthodontics and Paediatric Dentistry, Linköping, Sweden.
    Holst, Annalena
    Department of Paediatric Dentistry, Kalmar, Sweden.
    Signs and symptoms from ectodermal organs in young Swedish individuals with oligodontia2006In: International Journal of Paediatric Dentistry, ISSN 0960-7439, E-ISSN 1365-263X, Vol. 16, no 5, p. 320-326Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives. The aim was to assess signs and symptoms from other ectodermal organs in addition to teeth in young individuals with oligodontia and to establish the prevalence of oligodontia.

    Sample and methods.  Children born 1981–94 reported by dental teams in the Public Dental Service to have oligodontia were asked to participate in a clinical study. The examinations comprised a structured interview on symptoms from ectodermal organs, and testing of salivary secretion.

    Results.  One hundred and sixty-two individuals met the inclusion criteria, and 123 individuals (75·9%) participated in the clinical study. Half of the individuals had one to four signs or symptoms from ectodermal organs beside oligodontia. The most common sign was low salivary secretion. Twelve individuals (9·6%) with isolated oligodontia reported impaired function of the sweat glands, hair, or nails. The prevalence of oligodontia was 0·090%.

    Conclusions.  An early identification of individuals with oligodontia can be made in a majority of cases by checking that all permanent incisors have erupted at the age of 8 years. The validity in asking individuals about normal and abnormal function of ectodermal organs was found to be low. This indicates that there is a strong need to establish routine clinical criteria for dysplasia of ectodermal organs.

  • 3. Hallonsten, A L
    et al.
    Wendt, Lill-Kari
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Oral health.
    Mejàre, I
    Birkhed, D
    Håkansson, C
    Lindvall, A M
    Edwardsson, S
    Koch, G
    Dental caries and prolonged breast-feeding in 18-month-old Swedish children.1995In: International Journal of Paediatric Dentistry, ISSN 0960-7439, E-ISSN 1365-263X, Vol. 5, no 3, p. 149-155Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 4.
    Hugoson, Anders
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Oral health.
    Koch, Göran
    Helkimo, Anna Nydell
    Lundin, Sven-Ake
    Caries prevalence and distribution in individuals aged 3-20 years in Jönköping, Sweden, over a 30-year period (1973-2003)2008In: International Journal of Paediatric Dentistry, ISSN 0960-7439, E-ISSN 1365-263X, Vol. 18, no 1, p. 18-26Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Oral health status of individuals aged 3-80 years in the city of Jönköping, Sweden, has been assessed in a series of epidemiological studies over a 30-year period. AIM: To analyse the changes in caries prevalence and caries distribution in child population sample groups, based on studies performed in 1973, 1978, 1983, 1993, and 2003. DESIGN: Each time point included 500 randomly sampled individuals, divided into age groups of 3, 5, 10, 15, and 20 years. Results. Thirty-five per cent of 3-year-olds were caries free in 1973, compared with 69% 30 years later. Decayed and filled primary (dfs) and permanent surfaces (DFS) were reduced by 50-80% between 1973 and 2003. Adolescents aged 10 and 15 years exhibited the most pronounced reduction in DFS on the occlusal surfaces. By 2003, 90% of the proximal carious lesions in 15-year-olds were initial carious lesions. In 2003, about 60% of 15-year-olds had a DFS of < or = 5, while about 7% exhibited a DFS of > or = 26. CONCLUSIONS: Despite the dramatic decline in the prevalence of caries, caries remains a health problem among children, particularly those of preschool age. Continuous epidemiological studies are recommended to evaluate preventive measures.

  • 5.
    Norderyd, Johanna
    et al.
    Odontologiska Institutionen i Jönköping.
    Aronsson, Johan
    Ryhov County Hospital, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Hypoplastic root cementum and premature loss of primary teeth in Coffin–Lowry syndrome: a case report2012In: International Journal of Paediatric Dentistry, ISSN 0960-7439, E-ISSN 1365-263X, Vol. 22, no 2, p. 154-156Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background.  Coffin–Lowry syndrome (CLS) is a rare genetic disorder. The syndrome presents with psychomotor retardation, short stature, skeletal deformations, digit abnormalities, and distinctive facial features. Oral and dental findings in CLS are common and they include thick prominent lips, high palate, midline lingual furrow, hypodontia, microdontia, delayed eruption, and early tooth loss. Only one earlier case suggesting hypoplastic root cementum as cause for primary loss of teeth in CLS has been published.

    Case Report.  This case describes a 3-year-old boy with premature loss of primary incisors without preceding root resorption. In addition to the dental findings, the boy had several general signs and symptoms and the dental findings together with the other characteristics led to the clinical diagnosis of CLS, which later was genetically verified. Histological analysis of an extracted primary incisor showed hypoplastic root cementum.

    Conclusion.  Hypoplastic root cementum may explain early tooth loss in CLS. As early loss of primary teeth is rare, especially when there is no previous root resorption, the individual is likely to seek dental care. Thus, the dentist may play an important role in assisting in the diagnosing of CLS.

  • 6.
    Norderyd, Johanna
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. National Oral Disability Centre for Rare Disorders, The Institute for Postgraduate Dental Education, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Faulks, Denise
    CHU Clermont-Ferrand, Service d'Odontologie, Clermont-Ferrand, France.
    Molina, Gustavo
    Facultad de Odontología, Universidad Nacional de Córdoba, Cordoba, Argentina.
    Granlund, Mats
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Behavioural Science and Social Work.
    Klingberg, Gunilla
    Departement of Pediatric Dentistry, Faculty of Odontology, Malmö University, Malmö, Sweden.
    Which factors most influence referral for restorative dental treatment under sedation and general anaesthesia in children with complex disabilities: Caries severity, child functioning or dental service organisation?2018In: International Journal of Paediatric Dentistry, ISSN 0960-7439, E-ISSN 1365-263X, Vol. 28, no 1, p. 71-82Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    The UN Convention on the Rights of the Child gives all children right to the highest standard of services for treatment and rehabilitation. For children with disabilities, sedation and general anaesthesia (GA) are often indicated for dental treatment; however, accessibility to this varies. The International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health – Child and Youth version (ICF-CY) enables a biopsychosocial description of children undergoing dental treatment.

    Aim

    To investigate conscious sedation and GA in children with complex disabilities and manifest caries and analyse how caries, child functioning, and dental service organisation relate to dental GA (DGA), comparing Argentina, France, and Sweden using the ICF-CY.

    Design

    Quantitative, cross-sectional; data collected through structured interviews, observation, and dental records.

    Results

    Sedation and DGA were common. Children with limitations in interpersonal interactions and relationships were more likely to have had DGA (OR: 5.3, P = 0.015). Level of caries experience was strongly correlated with experience of DGA. There were significant differences between countries regarding caries prevalence, sedation, DGA, and functional and environmental factors.

    Conclusions

    Although caries experience and child functioning are important, dental health service organisation had the most impact on the incidence of DGA, and for the use of conscious sedation, for children with complex disabilities.

  • 7.
    Norderyd, Johanna
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. National Oral Disability Centre for Rare Disorders, The Institute for Postgraduate Dental Education, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Graf, Jonas
    Department of Otorhinolaryngology and Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Marcusson, Agneta
    Department of Dentofacial Orthopedics, Maxillofacial Unit, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Nilsson, Karolina
    Habilitation Centre, Ryhov County Hospital, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Sjöstrand, Eva
    Department for Child and Youth Habilitation, County Council of Östergötland, Linköping, Sweden.
    Steinwall, Gunilla
    Habilitation Centre, Ryhov County Hospital, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Ärleskog, Elinor
    Department of Oral & Maxillofacial Surgery, Linköping University Hospital, Linköping, Sweden.
    Bågesund, Mats
    Centre for Orthodontics and Paediatric Dentistry and Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Sublingual administration of atropine eyedrops in children with excessive drooling - a pilot study2017In: International Journal of Paediatric Dentistry, ISSN 0960-7439, E-ISSN 1365-263X, Vol. 27, no 1, p. 22-29Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Drooling can be a severe disability and have high impact on daily life. Reversible treatment is preferable.

    AIM: To analyse whether sublingual administration of atropine eyedrops is a useful reversible treatment option for severe drooling in children with disabilities.

    DESIGN: The study had a prospective, single-system research design. The participants served as their own controls. The study period was 3 weeks without treatment, 4 weeks with atropine eyedrop solution 10 mg/mL one drop a day followed by 4 weeks of one drop twice a day. Parents' rating of their child's drooling was assessed on a 100-mm VAS, and unstimulated salivary secretion rate measurement was performed together with notations about side effects and practicality.

    RESULTS: Parents' VAS assessment of drooling decreased from a median (range) of 74 (40-98) at baseline to 48 (18-88) (P = 0.05) and 32 (12-85) (P = 0.004) after 4 weeks of atropine once a day and another 4 weeks of atropine twice a day, respectively (n = 11). Unstimulated salivary secretion rates decreased from baseline to end of study (P = 0.032). Several parents complained about difficult administration. No irreversible side effects were noted.

    CONCLUSIONS: Sublingual atropine eyedrops may be an alternative for treatment of severe drooling in children with disabilities.

  • 8.
    Stensson, Malin
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Oral health.
    Wendt, Lill-Kari
    Koch, Göran
    Oldaeus, Göran
    Birkhed, Dowen
    Oral Health in preschool children with asthma2008In: International Journal of Paediatric Dentistry, ISSN 0960-7439, E-ISSN 1365-263X, Vol. 18, no 4, p. 243-250Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 9.
    Stensson, Malin
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Oral health.
    Wendt, Lill-Kari
    Koch, Göran
    Oldaeus, Göran
    Nilsson, Mats
    Birkhed, Dowen
    Oral health in pre-school children with asthma - followed from 3 to 6 years2010In: International Journal of Paediatric Dentistry, ISSN 0960-7439, E-ISSN 1365-263X, Vol. 20, no 3, p. 165-172Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to investigate caries and its determinants in preschool children with and without asthma, followed from 3 to 6 years. METHODS AND SUBJECTS: Caries, plaque, and gingivitis were examined at 3 and 6 years of age in 64 asthmatic children and 50 matched, healthy control children. Furthermore, at 6 years radiographic examination and saliva sampling were conducted. The parents were interviewed about various oral health-related factors. RESULTS: Initial caries increment between 3 and 6 years of age was statistically significant higher for children with asthma compared with children without asthma (P < 0.05). Asthmatic children had more bleeding gingivitis and a higher consumption of sugary drinks than healthy children at 3 years of age (P < 0.05). At both 3 and 6 years of age, the asthmatic children were more frequently mouth breathers than healthy children, only statistically significant for 6-year olds (P < 0.05). CONCLUSION: Preschool children with asthma at 3 years of age run a higher risk of developing caries lesions until 6 years of age compared with children without asthma. Children with asthma have a higher prevalence of bleeding gingivitis, a higher intake of sugary drinks and are more frequently mouth breathers than preschool children without asthma.

  • 10.
    Wendt, Lill-Kari
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Oral health.
    Koch, G
    Birkhed, D
    Abstracts from other journals.2001In: International Journal of Paediatric Dentistry, ISSN 0960-7439, E-ISSN 1365-263X, Vol. 11, no 6, p. 458-Article in journal (Refereed)
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