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  • 1.
    Acs, Zoltán J.
    et al.
    George Mason University, Arlington, VA, United States.
    Lappi, Emma
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre for Entrepreneurship and Spatial Economics (CEnSE). Swedish Entrepreneurship Forum, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Entrepreneurship, culture, and the epigenetic revolution: a research note2019In: Small Business Economics, ISSN 0921-898X, E-ISSN 1573-0913, p. 1-21Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We show how the type of alcohol consumed is related to the type of entrepreneurship present for economies in Europe. We differentiate between beer-, wine-, and spirit-drinking countries and distinguish between productive, unproductive, and destructive entrepreneurship. The underlying links do not emerge from drinking per se but rather the drinking habits and taste for beverage types capture deep cultural features and cultural similarities amongst the countries. Societies that prefer to drink beer are closer to each other culturally than those which prefer drinking wine or spirits. Therefore, the taste for alcohol type is merely an instrument in explaining cultural and institutional differences across entrepreneurship. Broadly speaking, beer-drinking countries are characterized by higher shares of productive entrepreneurship, wine-drinking countries with unproductive entrepreneurship, and spirit-drinking countries with destructive entrepreneurship. We discuss mechanisms in which the results are found and highlight a new research agenda, emphasizing the potential role of epigenetics. 

  • 2.
    Aktaş, Vezir
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Lifelong learning/Encell.
    Tepe, Yeliz Kındap
    Cumhuriyet UniversitySivasTurkey.
    Persson, Roland S.
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Lifelong learning/Encell.
    Investigating Turkish university students’ attitudes towards refugees in a time of Civil War in neighboring Syria2018In: Current psychology (New Brunswick, N.J.), ISSN 1046-1310, E-ISSN 1936-4733Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Thousands of refugees have immigrated to Turkey because of the current Civil War in neighboring Syria. This is causing tensions between refugees and locals. These increasingly negative attitudes towards the incoming victims of conflict are of particular interest. The present study, therefore, aimed at determining the premises of the emergence of such negative attitudes. The research sample consisted of university students who all studied at various faculties at Cumhuriyet University in the Turkish province of Sivas. Data were collected by the Attitude Scale Towards Refugees, the Patriotism Attitude Scale, the Interpersonal Reactivity Index, and the Cirhinlioğlu Religiosity Scale. Data were analyzed by Independent Sample t-tests as well as using Stepwise Regression Analyses. Results showed that the feeling of empathy correlated negatively with negative attitudes towards refugees, while blind patriotism, religiosity, and having nationalist/conservative orientations, correlated positively. Men were found to be more negative than women. The feeling of empathy was the most prominent factor in predicting the nature of attitudes towards refugees. Religious doctrine and distancing oneself from conservative and patriotic perspectives appeared to be effective in potentially preventing the development of negative attitudes. In conclusion, research results are discussed in the light of relevant literature.

  • 3.
    Berntson, Martin
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Disciplinary Research.
    Det förlorade bibeldramat. Teater och kyrka i Sverige under tidigmodern tid. En fallstudie2012In: Kyrka, kultur, historia. En festskrift till Johnny Hagberg / [ed] Markus Hagberg, Lena Maria Olsson, Sven-Erik Pernler, Skara: Skara stiftshistoriska sällskap , 2012, p. 57-71Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 4.
    Bremner, Craig
    et al.
    Charles Sturt Univ, Design, Bathurst, NSW, Australia.
    Bernadet, Laura
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Civil Engineeering and Lighting Science.
    The Museum of the Future: a sedimentary cloud2017In: Design journal, ISSN 1460-6925, E-ISSN 1756-3062, Vol. 20, no Suppl. 1, p. S3560-S3568Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Taking our cue from the impact of Joseph Kosuth’s 1965 conceptual artwork One and Three Chairs, there has always been one and three museums-the cosmos is the museum of light, the city is the museum of space and given the job of the museum is to indefinitely accumulate time the museum today is the museum of time. In this paper we present a fourth-the museum of the future. The museum and the department store were concurrent designs of industrialization; one-the store-collected the here-and-now and sold it as what-might-become while the other-the museum-collected what-was and projected it as what-we-have-become. However, the manifest crises of the planet illustrate the limits of our capacity to persuade ourselves we can imagine a future in which we want to live, and cast urgency on the long-term design project of being together. And the project of being together in the urban age is driving us to change the entire terrain of thought and action. Where once ideas drove change, change now appears to be split between two projects whose temporal dimensions govern the notion of ‘future’. One is the busy sharing of digital records of the as-found, and counter to this digital archive is the revival of designs of what-might-become illustrated in the boom in digital imagery of fantasy futures. In order to now imagine a future it has become necessary to navigate the competing time frames of the digital archiving of the past and the digital reproduction of the future. But for Jacques Derrida the question of the archive is not a question of the past but a question of the future, the very question of the future, of a response, of a promise and of a responsibility for tomorrow. According to him “the archive-if we want to know what this will have meant we will only know tomorrow.” And Hal Foster disconnects the archive from the museum when he questions “Might visual culture rely on techniques of information to transform a wide range of mediums into a system of image-text-a database of digital terms-an archive without museums?” In this paper we propose this temporal disjuncture-archive and future-can be bridged by the design of what we call the Museum of the Future whose windows open onto the permanent present. The Museum of the Future is not a location for the sentimental accumulation of time in the form of tasteful objects. According to Cedric Price “neither knowledge nor value can be stored and contained in a particular place” therefore “the museum of the future initiates a process of constant revision that assures the contingency and non-solidity of a building”. Following from Price we propose the Museum of the Future is a continuous interior whose form, stretched to compass the cumulous cloud of digital sentimentality and reproduction, functions as a sedimentary layer for our imaginings of increasingly populous and proximate future relations.

  • 5.
    Krantz, Joakim
    et al.
    Linnéuniversitetet, Institutionen för utbildningsvetenskap (UV).
    Lund, Anna
    Linnéuniversitetet, Institutionen för kulturvetenskaper (KV).
    Elevers möte med skapande skola2016In: Möten med mening: Ämnesdidaktiska studier i konst och humaniora / [ed] Karin L. Eriksson, Lund: Nordic Academic Press, 2016, p. 71-86Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 6.
    Laurell, Christofer
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Media, Management and Transformation Centre (MMTC). Stockholm School of Economics, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Björner, Emma
    Stockholm Business School, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Digital festival engagement: On the interplay between festivals, place brands, and social media2018In: Event Management, ISSN 1525-9951, E-ISSN 1943-4308, Vol. 22, no 4, p. 527-540Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article aims to explore the digitization of festival engagement due to the emergence of social media and the associated consequences this development brings for festivals and place brands. This is done by drawing on a study of eight festivals that took place in Sweden during the summer of 2015. In total, a material of 77,034 user-generated contents published in social media were collected and analyzed. The presented results illustrate that the studied festivals enjoy considerable levels of digital engagement and that this also generates engagement for the associated places in which the festivals take place. In view of these findings, this article presents the concepts of digital festival engagement and digital place-brand engagement to explain the interplay that takes place between festivals and place brands in social media. By doing so, this article contributes to extant literature within the field of event management by depicting how the digitization of festival engagement adds increased complexity as engagement manifests both physically and digitally, which in turn gives rise to several conceptual and managerial challenges in regards to the management of consumer engagement. 

  • 7.
    Nilsson, Christian
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Disciplinary Research.
    Fanan, förrädarna och friheten: Musiktexter med ideologiska teman från Tredje Riket till Vit Makt-rörelsen – en komparativ textanalys2009Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 8.
    Persson, Roland S
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Lifelong learning/Encell.
    Kulturförståelse i ett globaliserat samhälle2010 (ed. 1st)Book (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Den pågående globaliseringen ökar hela tiden behovet inte bara av att söka sig nya marknader, studera på andra orter och att arbeta och bo i andra länder. I allt ökande grad behövs också en kännedom om hur kulturer skiljer sig åt vad gäller värderingar, könsroller, maktförhållanden, ideal, regler, relationer och så vidare. I arbets- och vardagslivet har kulturkompetens blivit en nödvändighet. Boken vänder sig till alla som yrkesmässigt på olika sätt samspelar med andra kulturers representanter kortare eller längre tid, hemma eller utomlands. Den bygger på inrapporterad erfarenhet av en grupp personer från andra länder än Sverige som på olika sätt interagerat med Sverige och svenskarna. Fakta har emellertid huvudsakligen hämtats från en mycket omfattande vetenskaplig bas som representerar psykologi, sociologi, antroplogi, etnografi, management, pedagogik och i någon mån även psykiatri.

  • 9.
    Stiernstedt, Fredrik
    et al.
    Södertörns högskola, Medie- och kommunikationsvetenskap.
    Jakobsson, Peter
    Södertörns högskola, Medie- och kommunikationsvetenskap.
    Time, Space and Clouds of Information: Data Center Discourse and the Meaning of Durability2012In: Cultural Technologies: The Shaping of Culture in Media and Society / [ed] Göran Bolin, New York: Routledge , 2012, p. 103-118Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The information society, as an ideological formation, has previously been identified as celebrating speed and ephemerality: overcoming of boundaries, destabilization of identities and the dissapearance of distance (Mosco 2004). This paper however analyzes an ideological shift within digital culture. The paper identifies this shift as accompanying new business models, associated with what is often referred to as cloud computing. The success of this computing paradigm, we claim, is dependent on the construction of a new ideology, in which information is not only identified with speed and ephemerality but also stability and durability.

     

    Empirically the paper concerns data centers: large, dedicated buildings in which interconnected servers are used to store and process digital information, utilized for commercial or administrative purposes by governments, organizations, and companies like Google, Facebook and Microsoft. Data-centres are what Lisa Parks have called “obscure objects of media studies” (Parks 2009:101). They are hidden, out of sight, inconspicuous and often placed far from population centres. But at the same time they are “material imaginaries” comparable to the houses of large media corporations (cf. Ericson & Riegert 2010). They are conciously inscribed in a number of symbolic and ephemeral geographies. They are discursively – and not only materially – constructed as stabile, durable, lasting and safe. The purpose of the paper is to analyse how, by whom and with what purposes.

  • 10.
    Ursini, Francesco-Alessio
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, School Based Research, Teaching and Learning Language, Literature and Media.
    David Bowie's Influence on JoJo's Bizarre Adventure2017In: Comics Grid: Journal of Comics Scholarship, ISSN 1560-5892, E-ISSN 2048-0792, Vol. 7, article id 1Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article analyses the influence of David Bowie's work in JoJo's Bizarre Adventure, a manga known for its wealth of references to western popular culture. It is argued that David Bowie's cultural reception can be attested via the presence of three narrative themes featuring in this manga series. The first theme is the exploration of diverse genres and an innovative, genre-defying attitude. The second theme is the use of avant-garde, flamboyant and gender-ambiguous aesthetics for its fictional characters. The third theme is a self-reflexive approach to the creation of fictional characters, intended as an awareness of the temporary, transient nature of their role as reluctant heroes in their own stories.

  • 11.
    Ursini, Francesco-Alessio
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication.
    Punk "Bodies" and the "do it yourself" ethics.2016In: The Punk Aesthetics in Comics / [ed] Field, Chris, Keegan Lannon, Michael MacBride, and Christopher Douglas. Jefferson., McFarland pres , 2016, p. 108-126Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The goal of this chapter is to outline a theory of punk culture and its constituting principles that allow us to individuate punk comics. We focus on one specific aspect: the “Do It Yourself” (henceforth DYI) philosophy, usually defined as the desire to modify and design objects, possessions and parts of the environment (Wolf and McQuitty 1-2). Although certainly not specific to the punk movement, this philosophy played a key role in the evolution of punk culture. With respect to its use in comics, we address a central question about the role of this philosophy/principle: whether and how the DYI philosophy, acting as a core principle of punk culture, can crucially individuate “punk comics.” The chapter is organized as follows. Section 2 introduces core theoretical notions. Section 3 presents a discussion of comics that acted as “precursors” to the genre. Section 4 presents a discussion of punk comics, while section 5 discusses “contemporary” works in this genre. Section 6 concludes.

  • 12.
    Wikström, Patrik
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, ESOL (Entrepreneurship, Strategy, Organization, Leadership). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Media, Management and Transformation Centre (MMTC).
    Olin-Scheller, Christina
    Karlstad University.
    Understanding the Motivations of Fan Fiction Writers: A Functional Approach2011Conference paper (Refereed)
1 - 12 of 12
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