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  • 1.
    Asheim, Bjørn
    et al.
    CIRCLE, Lund University.
    Coenen, Lars
    CIRCLE, Lund University.
    Moodysson, Jerker
    CIRCLE, Lund University.
    Medicon Valley - A globally competitive, transnational bioregion2007Report (Other academic)
  • 2.
    Asheim, Bjørn
    et al.
    CIRCLE, Lund University.
    Coenen, Lars
    CIRCLE, Lund University.
    Moodysson, Jerker
    Department of Social and Economic Geography, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Vang, Jan
    Copenhagen Institute of Technology, Aalborg University, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Constructing knowledge-based regional advantage: Implications for regional innovation policy2007In: International Journal of Entrepreneurship and Innovation Management, ISSN 1368-275X, E-ISSN 1741-5098, Vol. 7, no 2-5, 140-155 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A focus on constructing regional advantage requires an 'unpacking' of what makes territorial agglomerations important for innovation and competitiveness by disclosing and revealing the contingencies, particularities and specificities of the various contexts and environments where knowledge creation, innovation and entrepreneurship take place. In order to achieve more effective regional innovation policy, this paper presents and discusses three dimensions along which such unpacking can take place. These dimensions refer to (1) specific industrial knowledge bases, (2) globally distributed knowledge networks and (3) different territorial competence bases.

  • 3.
    Asheim, Bjørn
    et al.
    CIRCLE, Lund University.
    Coenen, Lars
    CIRCLE, Lund University.
    Moodysson, Jerker
    Department of Social and Economic Geography, Lund University.
    Vang, Jan
    CIRCLE, Lund University.
    Regional innovation system policy: A knowledge-based approach2005Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    A focus on constructing regional advantage requires an unpacking of what makes territorial agglomerations important for innovation and growth by disclosing and revealing the contingencies, particularities and specificities of the various contexts and environments where knowledge creation, innovation and entrepreneurship take place. In order to achieve more effective regional innovation policy, the paper presents and discusses five dimensions along which such unpacking can take place. These dimensions refer to different perspectives that originate in different industrial knowledge bases, different territorial competence bases, the distributed knowledge base, the importance of creative knowledge environments and different institutional frameworks.

  • 4.
    Asheim, Bjørn
    et al.
    CIRCLE, Lund University.
    Isaksen, Arne
    University of Agder, Norway.
    Moodysson, Jerker
    CIRCLE, Lund University.
    Sotarauta, Markku
    University of Tampere, Finland.
    Knowledge bases, modes of innovation and regional innovation policy: a theoretical re-examination with illustrations from the Nordic countries2011In: Beyond territory: Dynamic geographies of knowledge creation, diffusion, and innovation / [ed] Harald Bathelt, Maryann Feldman and Dieter F. Kogler, Milton Park: Routledge, 2011, 227-249 p.Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 5.
    Backman, Mikaela
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre for Entrepreneurship and Spatial Economics (CEnSE).
    Nilsson, Pia
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre for Entrepreneurship and Spatial Economics (CEnSE).
    The role of cultural heritage in attracting skilled individuals2016In: Journal of Cultural Economics, ISSN 0885-2545, E-ISSN 1573-6997Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this paper is to examine the role played by built heritages and cultural environments, alongside other locational factors, in explaining the growth of human capital in Sweden. We distinguish between urban, natural and cultural qualities as different sources of regional attractiveness and estimate their influence on the observed growth of individuals with at least three years of higher education during 2001–2010. Neighborhood-level data are used, and unobserved heterogeneity and spatial dependencies are modeled by employing random effects estimations and an instrumental variable approach. Our findings indicate that the local supply of built heritages and cultural environments explain a significant part of human capital growth in Sweden. Results suggest that these types of cultural heritages are important place-based resources with a potential to contribute to improved regional attractiveness and growth.

  • 6.
    Bagley, Mark J. O.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics.
    A simulation of entrepreneurial spawning2017In: JASSS: Journal of Artificial Societies and Social Simulation, ISSN 1460-7425, E-ISSN 1460-7425, Vol. 20, no 3, 9Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper describes how patterns of industrial clustering arise with respect to the size of an initial firm when measured in terms of innovation. Through principles of evolutionary economics, the aim of this paper is to examine the ’birth’ of industrial clusters. We take an endogenous and supply-side approach, where firms in a region spawn from incumbents. Technology is qualitatively described using a code set mapped on a cognitive space. Assuming inheritability of networking skills, we seek to model how the size of an initial firm influences future patterns of cluster formation through a model of technical cognition and a mimicking of creativity. It is found that initial firm size has a lasting impact on clustering patterns through its influence on the level of cognitive distance of the underlying agents. The model replicates the stylised facts of entrepreneurial cluster formation.

  • 7.
    Coenen, Lars
    et al.
    Dept. of Social/Economic Geography, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Moodysson, Jerker
    Dept. of Social/Economic Geography, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Asheim, Bjørn
    Dept. of Social/Economic Geography, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Nodes, networks and proximities: On the knowledge dynamics of the Medicon Valley biotech cluster2004In: European Planning Studies, ISSN 0965-4313, E-ISSN 1469-5944, Vol. 12, no 7, 1003-1018 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Empirical research on the knowledge dynamics of biotechnology demonstrates a dual local-global knowledge flow pattern. The sector is characterised by strong spatial concentration around nodes of excellence that are interconnected through a global network. This requires a specification of the notion of proximity as a facilitator of learning processes which emphasises its multifaceted configuration. This study highlights the significance of relational proximity within epistemic communities shaping innovation processes across multi-spatial scales. These arguments are illustrated with a database-survey on collaboration in scientific publication by 109 biotechnology firms in the Danish-Swedish life-science cluster Medicon Valley.

  • 8.
    Daunfeldt, Sven-Olov
    et al.
    Högskolan Dalarna, Nationalekonomi.
    Mihaescu, Oana
    Högskolan Dalarna, Kulturgeografi.
    Nilsson, Helena
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics. Dalarna University, School of Technology and Business Studies.
    Rudholm, Niklas
    Högskolan Dalarna, Nationalekonomi.
    What happens when IKEA comes to town?2017In: Regional studies, ISSN 0034-3404, E-ISSN 1360-0591, Vol. 51, no 2, 313-323 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The effects of a new IKEA store on retail revenues, employment and inflow of purchasing power in the entry municipalities as well as in neighbouring municipalities were investigated using data from 2000–11. A propensity score-matching method was used to find non-IKEA entry municipalities that were as similar as possible to the entry municipalities based on the situation before entry. The results indicate that IKEA entry increased entry municipality durable goods revenues by about 20% and employment by about 17%. Only small and, in most cases, statistically insignificant effects were found in neighbouring municipalities.

  • 9.
    Eriksson, Sören
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    The Aircraft Industry as a Tool for Economic and Industrial Development – The Case of Indonesia2013In: Clusters And Economic Growth in Asia / [ed] Sören Eriksson, Cheltenham, UK, Northampton, MA, USA: Edward Elgar Publishing, 2013, 141-164 p.Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 10.
    Erlingsson, Gissur Ó
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Centrum för kommunstrategiska studier – CKS, Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Moodysson, Jerker
    CIRCLE, Lund University.
    Öhrvall, Richard
    Linnéuniversitetet, Växjö, Sverige.
    Lokal och regional tillväxtpolitik: Vad kan och bör offentliga aktörer göra?2011Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Syftet med denna rapport är att kartlägga forskning som har försökt besvara frågan vad offentliga aktörer i regioner och kommuner kan göra för att stärka tillväxten. Forskningsöversikten kompletteras med tentativa empiriska illustrationer som försöker finna samband mellan lokal tillväxt och några av de faktorer som i tidigare litteratur lyfts fram som särskilt betydelsefulla för tillväxt.

  • 11.
    Falck, Simon
    et al.
    KTH, Urbana och regionala studier.
    Westlund, Hans
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics, Finance and Statistics. KTH, Urbana och regionala studier.
    Regional Grants and FDI Location: Evidence from Swedish Regional Policy Programs 2002-20092013In: Romanian Journal of Regional Science, ISSN 1843-8520, Vol. 7, no 1, 36-68 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study investigates factors determining the location of foreign direct investments (FDI) in Sweden. The main purpose is to examine the link between FDI and public incentives, in the form of regional grants, which make up a central part of the Swedish regional policy and state expenditures that explicitly addresses regional development. Our main finding is that there is no evidence of a robust relationship between grants and the location of FDI. However, a statistically significant effect is found for investment support and transport allowance, which are grants that aims at promoting development in designated areas. This by supporting investments in machines, buildings, and so on, and offset costs disadvantages in the northern parts of the country. We conclude that a better integration between the work on FDI and regional development may be a plausible route to promote economic development in Sweden, particularly in deprived regions.

  • 12.
    Henning, Martin
    et al.
    CIRCLE, Lund University.
    Moodysson, Jerker
    CIRCLE, Lund University.
    Nilsson, Magnus
    CIRCLE, Lund University.
    Innovation and regional transformation: From clusters to new combinations2010Book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In summary, this book considers the conditions for a future innovation policy in Skåne from two perspectives. Firstly, from the existing economic structure; and secondly, from the experience gained from initiatives already in place. With a common theoretical understanding of the problem area, the book integrates a number of methodologically different approaches. Such a combination of methods is rare, yet provides a deeper understanding of the nature of the economy, of how the various sectors and industries are related to each other in terms of skills, and of how development initiatives for the various industries or clusters work. Theoretical discussions are intertwined with empirical observations of Skåne’s economy. In this way, the book is an introduction to contemporary innovation and policy literature, as well as a more specific discussion and decision basis for actors involved in the economy and policy of both Skåne and Sweden.

  • 13.
    Karlsson, Charlie
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre of Excellence for Science and Innovation Studies (CESIS).
    Andersson, MartinJönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre of Excellence for Science and Innovation Studies (CESIS).Norman, ThereseJönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre for Entrepreneurship and Spatial Economics (CEnSE).
    Handbook of Research Methods and Applications in Economic Geography2015Collection (editor) (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The main purpose of this Handbook is to provide overviews and assessments of the state-of-the-art regarding research methods, approaches and applications central to economic geography. The chapters are written by distinguished researchers from a variety of scholarly traditions and with a background in different academic disciplines including economics, economic, human and cultural geography, and economic history. The resulting handbook covers a broad spectrum of methodologies and approaches applicable in analyses pertaining to the geography of economic activities and economic outcomes.

  • 14.
    Karlsson, Charlie
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre of Excellence for Science and Innovation Studies (CESIS). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS Entrepreneurship Centre. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Institutet för näringslivsanalys. Centre of Excellence for Science and Innovation Studies (CESIS), KTH, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Tavassoli, Sam
    Centre for Innovation, Research and Competence in the Learning Economy (CIRCLE), Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Innovation strategies and firm performance2015Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper analyzes the effect of various innovation strategies of firms on their future performance, captured by labour productivity. Using five waves of the Community Innovation Survey in Sweden, we have traced the innovative behaviour of firms over a decade, i.e. from 2002 to 2012. We distinguish between sixteen innovation strategies, which compose of Schumpeterian four types of innovations, i.e. process, product, marketing, and organizational (simple innovation strategies) plus various combinations of these four types (complex innovation strategies). The main findings indicate that those firms that choose and afford to have a complex innovation strategy are better off in terms of their future productivity in compare with both those firms that choose not to innovative (base group) and those firms that choose simple innovation strategies. Moreover, not all types of complex innovation strategies affect the future productivity significantly; rather, there are only few of them. This necessitates a purposeful choice of innovation strategy for firms.

  • 15.
    Karlsson, Joel
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School. Department of Economics and Statistics, Linnaeus University Centre for Labour Market and Discrimination Studies, Linnaeus University, Växjö, Sweden.
    Mansson, Jonas
    Department of Economics and Statistics, Linnaeus University Centre for Labour Market and Discrimination Studies, Linnaeus University, Växjö, Sweden.
    Getting a full-time job as a part-time unemployed: How much does spatial context matter?2014In: The annals of regional science, ISSN 0570-1864, E-ISSN 1432-0592, Vol. 53, no 1, 179-195 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper investigates the extent to which differences in the probability to exit from part-time unemployment to a full-time job are accountable for by spatial contextual factors and individual characteristics. To correctly incorporate contextual effects, a multilevel analysis is applied using a mixed-effects model to explore whether contextual factors account for differences in the probability of transition to full-time employment between individuals with different characteristics. The results indicate that there is a contextual effect and that there are some spatial spill-over effects from neighbouring municipalities, and that the unemployment rate partly explains the context variability. Furthermore, the contextual effect is found to be especially large for individuals without a university degree.

  • 16.
    Kerkhoff, Kristina
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management. National Research University Higher School of Economics, Russia.
    Kaul, Kevin
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management.
    Hilletofth, Per
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management.
    Eriksson, David
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management.
    Sourcing from China: A Literature Review of Motivations, Outcomes, Problems, and Solutions2017In: Operations and Supply Chain Management, ISSN 1979-3561, Vol. 10, no 4, 226-239 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Today’s fast changing environment and increasing customers’ demands require that companies focus on efficiency along the entire supply chain. In order to achieve competitiveness, global sourcing is a common strategy. Especially sourcing from China is an accustomed practice and the topic of discussion by various academics and practitioners. Even though this topic is discussed extensively in literature, little focus is put on motivations, outcomes, problems and solutions when sourcing from China.The purpose of this study is to explore and analyze sourcing from China sourcing with regard to motivations, achieved outcomes, experienced problems as well as solutions to the problems. The results showed that it is crucial to recognize the importance of problems that can occur during global sourcing processes. As to achieve the desired outcomes, it is vital that companies address the problems by developing appropriate solutions. Motivations, outcomes, problems and solutions contain essential aspects that have to be considered and worked upon during a global sourcing process.

  • 17.
    Klaesson, Johan
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics.
    Larsson, Johan P.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics.
    Norman, Therese
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics.
    Accessibility and market potential analysis2015In: Handbook of research methods and applications in economic geography / [ed] Charlie Karlsson, Martin Andersson and Therese Norman, Northampton, MA: Edward Elgar Publishing, 2015, 412-435 p.Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this chapter is to overview the advances in the field of measuring and modeling the influence of geographic market potential and accessibility. In general the models are designed to assess the influence on location choices and growth performance. The initial question concerns the relationship between the two concepts ‘market potential’ and ‘accessibility’. Accessibility can be defined as the ability to reach goods, services, activities or destinations. Market potential can be described as the possibility of reaching customers, demand or some other resource. Both concepts have a long tradition in research. The concepts are often used to describe similar or even the same sort of phenomena. Evidently, we have two related concepts that essentially mean the same thing. Examples of this are illustrated by the following statements. ‘The concept of accessibility is not a new one, and has been introduced into regional economics and trade under the form of market potential’ (Behrens and Thisse, 2007, p. 462). The measure is ‘often called a potential accessibility index (sometimes simply called market potential), that measures accessibility’ (Yoshida and Diechmann, 2009, p. 3). In Combes et al. (2008, p. 304), the authors refer to Harris’s concept of market potential as ‘an indicator for the degree of accessibility to market’.

  • 18.
    Klaesson, Johan
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics, Finance and Statistics.
    Mellander, Charlotta
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics, Finance and Statistics.
    Öner, Özge
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics, Finance and Statistics.
    In search of services in the market place: A probability of presence approach for retail services in Sweden2012In: Innovative Marketing, ISSN 1814-2427, Vol. 8, no 3, 47-60 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper examines the probability of finding a number retail services in Swedish municipalities with respect to theirmarket potential. In particular, the authors investigate how different degrees of market potential affects the presence ofcertain retail activities in central and non-central municipalities in Sweden. Using a probabilistic approach, the resultssuggest that, for both central and non-central municipalities, the probability of finding certain retail services dependsheavily on the market potential within the municipality. The size of the external market is determined to have a varyingimpact depending both on the size of the market place, and the type of the retail branch investigated.

  • 19.
    Lanai, Robin
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics, Finance and Statistics.
    The Economic Geography of Culture: A Swedish Perspective2015Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Research continuously highlights creativity’s importance for regional growth. This thesis aims to understand what economic factors that affect the place of culture in Sweden. All of the 290 Swedish municipalities are studied, using occupational data from 2011. Both a weighted least squares regression and an ordinal logit regression are run, in order to study both the concentration and the variety of culture. The main findings are that aver-age income show a significant positive relationship with the place of culture, the con-centration of cultural facilities showed a significant positive relationship with the place of culture, while the share of culture expenditure by local government did not show a significant relationship. Furthermore, the location of culture in 2000 showed significant influence on the location of culture in 2011, but the location of culture in 1990 did not.

  • 20.
    Larsson, Johan P.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics, Finance and Statistics.
    The neighborhood or the region? Reassessing the density-wage relationship using geocoded data2014In: The annals of regional science, ISSN 0570-1864, E-ISSN 1432-0592, Vol. 52, no 2, 367-384 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    I analyze the effects of sub-city-level density of economic activity on wages. Using a geocoded dataset on employment and wages in the city areas of Sweden, the analysis is based on squares representing "neighborhoods" (, "districts" (, and "agglomerations" (. The wage-density elasticity depends on spatial resolution, with the elasticity being highest in neighborhood squares, where a doubling of density is associated with wage increases of 1.2 %, or roughly the size of the elasticity for region density. Moving from a mean-density neighborhood to the densest neighborhood would on average increase wages by 9 %. The results are consistent with (i) the existence of a localized density spillover effect and (ii) quite sharp attenuation of human capital spillovers. An implication of the findings is that if the data source is not sufficiently disaggregated, analyses of the density-wage link risk understating the benefits of working in dense parts of regions, such as the central business districts.

  • 21.
    Larsson, Johan P
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics. Swedish Entrepreneurship Forum, Sweden.
    Wennberg, Karl
    Institute for Analytical Sociology (IAS), Linköping University, Norrköping, Sweden.
    Wiklund, Johan
    Whitman School of Management, Syracuse University, United States.
    Wright, Mike
    Imperial College London, England, UK.
    Location choices of graduate entrepreneurs2017In: Research Policy, ISSN 0048-7333, E-ISSN 1873-7625, Vol. 46, no 8, 1490-1504 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We review complementary theoretical perspectives on location choices of university graduate entrepreneurs derived from the individual-opportunity nexus and local embeddedness perspectives on entrepreneurship. Analysis of the full population of 215,388 graduates from Swedish institutions of higher education between 2002 and 2006 provides support for both location choice perspectives. Overall, 63% of graduate entrepreneurs start businesses locally in their region of graduation while 37% start businesses elsewhere. The likelihood of starting locally is substantially higher in metropolitan regions, if the graduate was born locally or has university peer entrepreneurs and entrepreneurial family members in the region of graduation. Implications for theory and public policy are discussed. 

  • 22.
    Manniche, Jesper
    et al.
    Centre for Regional and Tourism Research, Denmark.
    Moodysson, Jerker
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School. Centre for Innovation, Research and Competence in the Learning Economy, Lund University.
    Testa, Stefania
    Department of Mechanical Engineering, Energetics, Management and Transports, University of Genoa, Italy.
    Combinatorial knowledge bases: An integrative and dynamic approach to innovation studies2017In: Economic Geography, ISSN 0013-0095, E-ISSN 1944-8287, Vol. 93, no 5, 480-499 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aims of this article are (1) to critically review the theoretical arguments and contribution of the knowledge base approach to economic geography and innovation studies, and the value added and limitations of applying it in empirical studies as reported about in the extant literatures; (2) to propose a new interpretation of the knowledge base approach by integrating it into a larger analytical framework for innovation studies that integrates individual, organizational, and contextual aspects, and to discuss the possible advances that come from using it in economic geography studies. The article dismisses the widespread taxonomical application of knowledge base conceptualizations for classification of firms, industries, and economies into fixed categories based on their dominant knowledge base characteristics. Rather it argues that the knowledge base characteristics vary not only between firms and industries but also over time and through innovation trajectories in firms and industries. The new interpretation implies that the knowledge base characteristics are defined not only by individual-level modes and rationales for knowledge creation and application and by their related spatial implications but also by managerial–organizational aspects with regard to coordination and exploitation of such knowledge dynamics. The integration of literatures from different disciplinary strands, now unified under the umbrella of a reinterpreted knowledge base approach, advances the explanatory value of the knowledge base approach in economic geography and innovation studies as well as related disciplines.

  • 23.
    Martin, Roman
    et al.
    CIRCLE, Lund University.
    Moodysson, Jerker
    CIRCLE, Lund University.
    Comparing knowledge bases: on the organisation and geography of knowledge flows in the regional innovation system of Scania, southern Sweden2011Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper deals with knowledge flows and collaboration between firms in the regional innovation system of southern Sweden. It focuses on industries which draw on different types of knowledge bases. The aim is to analyse how the functional and spatial organisation of knowledge interdependencies among firms and other actors vary between different types of industries which are part of the same regional innovation system. We argue that knowledge sourcing and exchange in geographical proximity is especially important for industries that rely on a synthetic or symbolic knowledge base, since the interpretation of the knowledge they deal with tend to differ between places. This is less the case for industries drawing on an analytical knowledge base, which rely more on scientific knowledge that is codified, abstract and universal, and therefore less sensitive to geographical distance. Thus, geographic clustering of firms in analytical industries builds on other rationale than the need of proximity for knowledge sourcing and exchange. To analyse these assumptions empirically, we draw on data from three case studies of firm clusters in the region of southern Sweden: (1) the life science cluster represents an analytical (science) based industry, (2) the food cluster includes mainly synthetic (engineering) based industries, and (3) the moving media cluster is considered as symbolic (artistic) based. Knowledge sourcing and knowledge exchange in each of the cases are explored and compared using social network analysis in association with a dataset gathered through interviews with firm representatives.

  • 24.
    Martin, Roman
    et al.
    CIRCLE, Lund University.
    Moodysson, Jerker
    CIRCLE, Lund University.
    Innovation in symbolic industries: the geography and organisation of knowledge sourcing2010Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper deals with geographical and organisational patterns of knowledge flows in the media industry of southern Sweden, an industry that is characterised by a strong ‘symbolic’ knowledge base. Aim is to address the question of the local versus the non-local as the prime arena for knowledge exchange, and to examine the organisational patterns of knowledge sourcing with specific attention paid to the nature of the knowledge sourced. Symbolic industries draw heavily on creative production and a cultural awareness that is strongly embedded in the local context; thus knowledge flows and networks are expected to be most of all locally configured, and firms to rely on informal knowledge sources rather than scientific knowledge or principles. Based on structured and semi-structured interviews with firm representatives, these assumptions are empirically assessed through social network analysis and descriptive statistics. Our findings show that firms rely above all on knowledge that is generated in project work through learning-by-doing and by interaction with other firms in localised networks. The analysis contributes to transcending the binary arguments on the role of geography for knowledge exchange which tend to dominate the innovation studies literature.

  • 25.
    Martin, Roman
    et al.
    CIRCLE, Lund University.
    Moodysson, Jerker
    CIRCLE, Lund University.
    Innovation in symbolic industries: the geography and organization of knowledge sourcing2011In: European Planning Studies, ISSN 0965-4313, E-ISSN 1469-5944, Vol. 19, no 7, 1183-1203 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper deals with geographical and organizational patterns of knowledge flows in the media industry of southern Sweden, an industry that is characterized by a strong ?symbolic? knowledge base. The aim is to address the question of the local versus the non-local as the prime arena for knowledge exchange, and to examine the organizational patterns of knowledge sourcing with specific attention paid to the nature of the knowledge sourced. Symbolic industries draw heavily on creative production and a cultural awareness that is strongly embedded in the local context; thus knowledge flows and networks are expected to be most of all locally configured, and firms to rely on less formalized knowledge sources rather than scientific knowledge or principles. Based on structured and semi-structured interviews with firm representatives, these assumptions are empirically assessed through social network analysis and descriptive statistics. Our findings show that firms rely above all on knowledge that is generated in project work through learning-by-doing and by interaction with other firms in localized networks.

  • 26.
    Martin, Roman
    et al.
    CIRCLE, Lund University.
    Moodysson, Jerker
    CIRCLE, Lund University.
    Zukauskaite, Elena
    CIRCLE, Lund University.
    Regional innovation policy beyond ‘best practice’: Lessons from Sweden2010Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper deals with policy measures in the regional innovation system of Scania, Southern Sweden. Focus is dedicated to requirements on innovation policy from actors representing different industries. Previous studies have identified profound differences with regard the organization of knowledge sourcing between firms and other actors in industries drawing on different knowledge bases. In correspondence with these findings, industries differ also with regard to how policy measures aiming to support innovation are perceived and acquired. Despite this, there is a tendency among regional policy programs to base their strategies on one ‘best practice’-model, inspired by successful (or sometimes less successful) cases in other parts of the world. The paper presents an in-depth analysis of such policy support targeting three industries located in one region, and ends with a suggestion to how those should be adapted to render influence on the institutional framework of the regional innovation system.

  • 27.
    Moodysson, Jerker
    CIRCLE, Lund University.
    Principles and practices of knowledge creation: On the organization of "buzz" and "pipelines" in life science communities2008In: Economic Geography, ISSN 0013-0095, E-ISSN 1944-8287, Vol. 84, no 4, 449-469 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article links up with the debate in economic geography on "local buzz" and "global pipelines" as two distinct forms of interactive knowledge creation among firms and related actors and argues for a rethinking of the way social scientists should approach interactive knowledge creation. It highlights the importance of combining the insights from studies of clusters and innovation systems with an activity-oriented approach in which more attention is paid to the specific characteristics of the innovation processes and the conditions underpinning their organization. To illustrate the applicability and added value of such an alternative approach, the notion of embeddedness is linked with some basic ideas adopted from the literature on knowledge communities. The framework is then applied to a study of innovation activities conducted by firms and academic research groups working with biotechnology-related applications in the Swedish part of the Medicon Valley life science region. The findings reveal that local buzz is largely absent in these types of activities. Most interactive knowledge creation, which appears to be spontaneous and unregulated, is, on closer examination, found safely embedded in globally configured professional knowledge communities and attainable only by those who qualify.

  • 28.
    Moodysson, Jerker
    Institutionen för kulturgeografi och ekonomisk geografi, Lunds universitet.
    Sites and modes of knowledge creation: On the spatial organization of biotechnology innovation2007Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The accelerated speed and intensity of global interconnections in all segments of society during the last couple of decades have had a profound impact on the workings of contemporary capitalism. Increased pressure is put on national and regional economies to continuously upgrade their competitive advantages, at the same time as new learning opportunities occur at a faster rate than ever. For reasons like these, knowledge is described as the most important resource, and learning the most important process, for firms and organizations, as well as nations and regions, to become and remain competitive. In parallel with the forces of globalization there are however also strong forces of localization. Empirical studies reveal that knowledge intensive industries tend to agglomerate in space, often in proximity to leading universities and research institutes, and several policy initiatives raised in attempts to meet the challenges of globalization are focused on promoting local knowledge spillovers between industry and academia. Observations like these intrigue geographers interested in the spatial organization of innovation and raises important questions about what is local and what is global in the globalizing learning economy.

    This study takes these observations as point of departure and develops a conceptual framework used to analyze the spatial organization of innovation in biotechnology. Biotechnology is a suitable case for such analysis since it represents a set of activities in the intersection of science and industry which displays both globalization and localization. By combining a system perspective with in-depth focus on concrete knowledge creation activities the study explains how and why knowledge interaction between firms and related actors varies with different activities embedded in the innovation processes. Empirical focus is put the Swedish-Danish bioregion Medicon Valley. The study is reported in five articles which can also be read separately. Two of the articles focus on the aggregate of dedicated biotechnology firms (DBFs) composing the bioregion, while the remaining three focus on a selection of DBFs and academic research groups involved in innovation projects spanning from basic science with not yet fully identified commercial applications to more applied product development in different subfields of biotechnology related industries.

  • 29.
    Moodysson, Jerker
    et al.
    Department of Social and Economic Geography, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Coenen, Lars
    Department of Social and Economic Geography, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Asheim, Bjørn
    Department of Social and Economic Geography, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Explaining spatial patterns of innovation: Analytical and synthetic modes of knowledge creation in the Medicon Valley life-science cluster2008In: Environment and planning A, ISSN 0308-518X, E-ISSN 1472-3409, Vol. 40, no 5, 1040-1056 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The authors address the dichotomy around ‘proximate’ and ‘distant’ learning processes by looking specifically at the characteristics of the knowledge-creation process. By way of suggesting an alternative conceptualization to the well-known tacit–codified knowledge dichotomy they propose a distinction between ‘analytical’ and ‘synthetic’ modes of knowledge creation. Analytical knowledge creation refers to the understanding and explaining of features of the (natural) world. Synthetic knowledge creation refers to the design or construction of something to attain functional goals. By applying this framework to qualitative empirics from the Medicon Valley life-science cluster, the authors demonstrate the complementarity of globally distributed analytical knowledge creation and locally oriented synthetic knowledge creation.

  • 30.
    Panova, Yulia
    et al.
    National Research University Higher School of Economics, Russia.
    Hilletofth, Per
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Industrial Production.
    Feasibility of nearshoring European manufacturing located in China to Russia2017In: Operations and Supply Chain Management, ISSN 1979-3561, Vol. 10, no 3, 141-148 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this study is to identify and analyze factors that support nearshoring of offshored European manufacturing located in China to Russia. The attention is paid to factors, such as labor cost, inflation, exchange rate, and labor productivity that are analyzed based on deterministic models to identify logical dependencies. This study shows that wage growth might deprive manufacturing in China from its main competitive advantage of cheap labor in the forthcoming years. The growing wage rates naturally contribute to the prime cost that is aggravated by the potential inflation, which, in turn, limit the margin in the selling price. The cumulative effect of other extra costs can aggregate such an amount that, in the foreseeable future, companies would need to relocate manufacturing to new locations. One option could be to nearshore manufacturing to Russia.

  • 31.
    Panova, Yulia
    et al.
    Emperor Alexander I St. Petersburg State Transport University.
    Hilletofth, Per
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Industrial Production.
    Infrastructure project portfolios for sourcing nearshoring of manufacturing to Russia2016In: Russian Journal of Logistics and Transport Management, ISSN 2313-7002, Vol. 3, no 1, 52-63 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Due to the growing labour cost in China, many organisations are reconsidering their offshoring decisions of manufacturing based on the deprived competitive advantage of cheap workforces. In light of these circumstances, Russia can be seen as an alternative venue with lower wages and improved governmental policy. In order to support the statement, this article provides comparative country analysis in terms of the impact of wage growth on the selling price of products. Additionally, the regulatory role in the attraction of the investments to the national economy is highlighted. In the focus are multiple communication infrastructure projects, such as dry ports, which are essential transport nodes for supporting industrial zones, where freight traffic is generated and terminated. For their development across the perspective, economic regions, the resilient investment portfolios are proposed. The inclusion of reactive and proactive strategies allows mitigating the risks and allocating transport infrastructure required for the provision of nearshoring decisions on locating manufacturers in Russia.

  • 32.
    Pesämaa, Ossi
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre for Innovation Systems, Entrepreneurship and Growth .
    Advances in modern tourism research: Economic perspectives – Edited by Álvaro Matias, Peter Nijkamp, Paulo Alexandre Neto2009In: Papers in regional science (Print), ISSN 1056-8190, Vol. 88, no 1, 249-250 p.Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 33.
    Rickardsson, Jonna
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics, Finance and Statistics.
    Göthberg, Josefine
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics, Finance and Statistics.
    The Gender Wage Gap: - among Swedish municipalities2015Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Though successively decreasing over time, gender wage gaps are still large in all

    western countries. When gender wage gaps exist, there is an unequal distribution of

    economic power between men and women. This paper examines variables that

    significantly relate to the differences in the size of the gender wage gap across

    Swedish municipalities. With data gathered from Statistics Sweden and the Swedish

    Social Insurance Agency for the year 2011, a series of OLS regressions are

    performed. By examining what variables are statistically related to variations in the

    gender wage gap over municipalities, for example, average wage, human capital,

    gender segregation and work absence, the aim is to further contribute to the field of

    gender economics. The results in this paper show that the gender wage gap exists in

    all 290 Swedish municipalities. It varies greatly with women earning only 56 percent

    of men’s wages in Danderyd to women earning 87 percent of men’s wages in

    Haparanda. In municipalities where average wages are high the gender wage gap is

    large. Long-term illness and lowered capacity to work are strong factors negatively

    affecting the gender wage gap. In municipalities where women are more affected by

    long-term illness and lowered capacity to work than men the gender wage gap is

    larger. Furthermore, there is a significant relation between the gender wage gap and

    human capital. The gender wage gap is larger in municipalities where a large share of

    the population has a higher education.

  • 34.
    Silveira, Franciane Freitas
    et al.
    Universidade Federal do ABC, Brazil.
    Sbragia, Roberto
    Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil.
    Lopez-Vega, Henry
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Media Management and Transformation Centre (MMTC).
    Tell, Fredrik
    Uppsala university, Sweden.
    Determinants of reverse knowledge transfer for emerging market multinationals: The role of complexity, autonomy and embeddedness2017In: Revista de Administração, ISSN 0080-2107Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Subsidiaries conduct innovation activities in foreign markets either to capture valuable knowledge that is necessary to adapt their products to local markets or to create valuable knowledge for headquarters. For emerging market multinationals, most studies have overlooked the determinants of successful reverse knowledge transfer from subsidiaries located in emerging and developed markets. This paper analyzed the responses of a survey administered to 78 Brazilian multinationals that own subsidiaries in developed and emerging markets. We found that knowledge complexity developed at the subsidiary, its autonomy and embeddedness in the foreign market determine the successful reverse knowledge transfer to headquarters of emerging market multinationals. This paper contributes to previous studies of reverse knowledge transfer by underlying the main drivers for emerging market multinationals.

  • 35.
    Tavassoli, Sam
    et al.
    School of Management, RMIT University, Melbourne, Australia.
    Karlsson, Charlie
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre of Excellence for Science and Innovation Studies (CESIS). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS Entrepreneurship Centre. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Institutet för näringslivsanalys. Centre of Excellence for Science and Innovation Studies (CESIS), KTH, Stockholm, Sweden.
    The role of regional context on innovation persistency of firms2017In: Papers in regional science (Print), ISSN 1056-8190, E-ISSN 1435-5957, 1-25 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper analyses the role of regional context on innovation persistency of firms. Using the Community Innovation Survey in Sweden, we have traced firms’ innovative behaviour from 2002 to 2012, in terms of four Schumpeterian types of innovation: product, process, organizational, and marketing. Controlling for an extensive set of firm-level characteristics, we find that certain regional characteristics matter for innovation persistency of firms. In particular, those firms located in regions with: (i) thicker labour market or (ii) higher extent of knowledge spillover exhibit higher probability of being persistent innovators up to 14 percentage points. Such higher persistency is mostly pronounced for product innovators.

  • 36.
    Westlund, Hans
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics.
    Li, Yuheng
    Institute of Geographic Sciences and Natural Resources Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, China.
    Analysis of local social capital2015In: Handbook of research methods and applications in economic geography / [ed] Charlie Karlsson, Martin Andersson and Therese Norman, Northampton, MA: Edward Elgar Publishing, 2015, 321-341 p.Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This chapter deals with social capital from a certain perspective, that is, local social capital. However, before we start the analysis of what it is that characterizes local social capital and how it is being studied, it is necessary to relate to some of the contentious issues of social capital in general – as these are sometimes also reflected in local social capital.

  • 37.
    Westlund, Hans
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics, Finance and Statistics. KTH, Urbana och regionala studier.
    Rutten, Roel
    Department of Organisation Studies, Tilburg University, Tilburg, Netherlands.
    Boekema, Frans
    Department of Human Geography, Nijmegen University, Nijmegen, Netherlands.
    Social Capital, Distance, Borders and Levels of Space: Conclusions and Further Issues2010In: European Planning Studies, ISSN 0965-4313, E-ISSN 1469-5944, Vol. 18, no 6, 965-970 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 38.
    Yuheng, Li
    et al.
    Institute of Geographic Sciences and Natural Resources Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China.
    Zhang, Zhenghe
    College of Economics and Management in China Agricultural University, Beijing, China.
    Westlund, Hans
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics. Department of Urban Planning and Environment, KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Yansui, Liu
    Institute of Geographic Sciences and Natural Resources Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China.
    Rural household income in transitional China: Spatio-temporal disparity and its interpretation2015In: China: An International Journal, ISSN 0219-7472, E-ISSN 0219-8614, Vol. 13, no 2, 151-168 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article aims to investigate the evidence of spatio-temporal disparity in rural household income at the provincial level in China during the 1978-2007 period. A research framework is developed to study the transitional processes of decentralisation, marketisation, urbanisation and globalisation. By computing the Moran's I index and using the spatial regression model, the findings indicate a highly clustered, spatio-temporal disparity in rural household income across the eastern, central and western regions in China during the post-reform era. Rural household income tends to be higher in the eastern provinces in comparison to inland provinces. This disparity is attributed to the impacts from the institutional, economic, social and external transitions that become increasingly significant in the recent decades in China.

  • 39.
    Öner, Özge
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics, Finance and Statistics.
    Accessibility to knowledge and new firm formation in Sweden2013In: Studies in Regional Science, ISSN 0287-6256, Vol. 43, no 1, 89-104 p.Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper investigates how accessibility to knowledge is related to the new firm formation in Sweden. Utilizing municipal level data, the paper examines how and to what extent geographic proximity to establish-ments that are specialized in formal knowledge creation plays a role for the overall entrepreneurial milieu in a city region. While measuring accessibility to knowledge at intra-municipal, intra-regional and extra-regional levels, the paper maps out the clustering patterns of new firms and ranks the municipalities by their perfor-mance in creating an entrepreneurial milieu. The clustering patterns of new firms highlight critical factors in new firm formation and entrepreneurial performance of regions.

  • 40.
    Öner, Özge
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics, Finance and Statistics. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre for Entrepreneurship and Spatial Economics (CEnSE). Research Institute of Industrial Economics (IFN), Sweden.
    Retail City: The Relationship between Place Attractiveness and Accessibility to Shops2017In: Spatial Economic Analysis, ISSN 1742-1772, E-ISSN 1742-1780, Vol. 12, no 1, 72-91 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Retail city: the relationship between place attractiveness and accessibility to shops. Spatial Economic Analysis. This paper explores the role of retailers as an urban amenity. Using data for Swedish rural and city municipalities for 2002–08, ‘accessibility-to-shops’ measures are constructed for the shops in the municipalities and the hosting regions separately to examine the relationship between consumption possibilities and place attractiveness in a spatial continuum. Place attractiveness is proxied by a Q ratio for Swedish housing investment based on Tobin’s Q. Access to stores within municipal market boundaries is found to be relevant for the place attractiveness of city municipalities, whereas no such relationship is evident for rural municipalities.

  • 41.
    Öner, Özge
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics, Finance and Statistics. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre for Entrepreneurship and Spatial Economics (CEnSE). Research Institute of Industrial Economics, Sweden.
    Retail Productivity: The effects of market size and regional hierarchy2016In: Papers in regional science (Print), ISSN 1056-8190, E-ISSN 1435-5957Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    How important is regional hierarchy for retailers’ productivity? This paper investigates the determinants of independent retailers’ productivity in Sweden between 2002 and 2008 with respect to market size and regional hierarchy. Using an accessible market potential approach, the impact of the potential demand in close proximity, and in the region is investigated separately for stores in central and peripheral retail markets. The findings suggest that the market size in close proximity has a higher impact on the productivity of stores located in central markets, whereas the market potential in the region has similar productivity returns for both stores in central markets and stores in non-central markets.

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