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  • 1. Aartsen, Marja
    et al.
    Béland, Daniel
    Edmondson, Ricca
    Ginn, Jay
    Komp, Kathrin
    Nilsson, Magnus
    Karlstads universitet, Avdelningen för sociala studier.
    Perek-Bialas, Jolanta
    Sorensen, Penny
    Weicht, Bernard
    Ageing in the light of crises: Economic crisis, demographic change, and the search for meaning2012Report (Other academic)
  • 2.
    Bergnehr, Disa
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för tema, Tema Barn. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten..
    Bernhardt, Eva
    Sociologiska institutionen, Stockholms universitet, Sweden.
    The non-modern child? Ambivalence about parenthood among young adults2013In: The Social Meaning of Children and Fertility Change in Europe / [ed] Anne Lisa Ellingsaeter, An-Magritt Jensen & Merete Lie, London and New York: Routledge , 2013, 1, p. 102-119Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the present study, we investigate the meanings that having a child connotes for youngadults in Sweden. In a rare research design, we draw on both survey data and focus groupinterviews, and thus we utilize the strengths of both quantitative and qualitative information.The child connotes dependence and stability and is likely to restrict the personal freedom ofits parents, while at the same time children are supposed to make life more meaningful. Thispotentially creates ambivalent feelings about having a child, and possibly also about the(potential) child itself. We investigate and discuss the ambivalence found in the data byasking the following questions: How do men and women answer survey questions about thepositive and negative implications having a child may have on their life? How do men andwomen in focus group interviews reason about the implications a child may have on their life?Both sorts of data provide evidence that young adults in Sweden are concerned aboutrestrictions in their personal freedom as an expected negative consequence of becomingparents. The child connotes dependence and responsibilities in a society where independenceand self-actualization are highly valued, and may thus be referred to as non-modern. Judgingfrom the analysis of the survey data, it seems that young men are more worried aboutrestricted personal freedom than are the young women, and this is the main reason behindtheir feeling more ambivalent. Post-secondary education increases the likelihood that therespondent is ambivalent. The overwhelming majority, of both men and women, in the dataexpect to make the transition to parenthood, at some point in their life, as this is regarded as anatural step to take and that the child adds meaning to life being a symbol of dependence,belonging and social relations – also valued aspects of life. However, they appear to strive topostpone the transition, so that they can enjoy the unrestricted freedom of single life for quitesome time. This ambivalence is likely to contribute to an increasing age of becoming a motheror a father, without necessarily leading to more (final) childlessness. The present studycontributes to the understanding of what notions and ideals young adults face, reproduce andact in relation to. It illuminates contemporary connotations of the child, and the ambivalencethat different meanings of the child may cause.

  • 3.
    Bergnéhr, Disa
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för tema, Tema Barn. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten..
    Social influence and the timing of parenthood2009In: Interpersona, ISSN 1981-6472, E-ISSN 1981-6472, Vol. 3, no 1, p. 61-83Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There is a general trend of postponing entry into parenthood in Europe, Scandinavia being no exception. Previous research has suggested a range of reasons for this pattern to emerge, but comparatively little attention has been given the possible impact of the social network on the decision to try for a child. This paper explicates ways in which young Swedish adults in focus group discussions reason about the impact of friends and family in their reproductive decision-making. The analysis is based on a discourse analytical approach and inspired by social influence theory. The result of the focus group data indicates that the desire to maintain belonging and rootedness to friends as well as to kin is influential in procreative decision-making. Friends and family are recurrently referred to in the participants’ reasoning about when parenthood is preferably entered.

  • 4.
    Borell, Klas
    et al.
    Mittuniversitetet, Institutionen för socialt arbetet, Östersund.
    Gerdner, Arne
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Research Platform of Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Behavioural Science and Social Work.
    Religion, etnicitet och organisation2010In: Invandrare & Minoriteter, ISSN 1404-6857, no 1, p. 13-17Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Flertalet muslimska samfund i Sverige är mångetniska mötesplatser för troende från olika kulturer och islamska traditioner. Församlingarna söker en gemensam andlig plattform och vägar för att utveckla nya organisationsformer.

  • 5.
    Borell, Klas
    et al.
    Mittuniversitetet, Institutionen för socialt arbetet, Östersund.
    Gerdner, Arne
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. SALVE (Social challenges, Actors, Living conditions, reseach VEnue). Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Social Work.
    Sällström, Anna
    Nordlander, Johanna
    Lundkvist, Elisabeth
    Muslimska församlingar i lokalsamhället: Samverkan eller isolering?2011In: Socialvetenskaplig tidskrift, ISSN 1104-1420, no 1, p. 63-77Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [sv]

    Muslimska församlingars riksomfattande etablering i Sverige är en viktig förändring inom den ideella sektorn. Men hur förhåller sig församlingarna till den svenska traditionen av samverkan mellan ideella och offentliga aktörer? I artikeln studeras hur och i vilken omfattning muslimska församlingar samverkar med offentliga aktörer och vilka organisationsinterna och organisationsexterna faktorer som gynnar respektive missgynnar samverkan.

  • 6.
    Darin-Mattsson, Alexander
    et al.
    Karolinska Institutet, Solna, Sweden; Stockholm University, Sweden .
    Andel, Ross
    School af Aging Studies, University of South Florida, Tampa, USA; International Clinical Research Center, St. Anne’s University Hospital, Brno, Czech Republic .
    Fors, Stefan
    Karolinska Institutet, Solna, Sweden; Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Kåreholt, Ingemar
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Karolinska Institutet, Solna, Sweden; Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Are Occupational Complexity and Socioeconomic Position Related to Psychological Distress 20 Years Later?2015In: Journal of Aging and Health, ISSN 0898-2643, E-ISSN 1552-6887, Vol. 27, no 7, p. 1266-1285Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To assess occupational complexity in midlife in relation to psychological distress in older adulthood (69+ years) and explore the role of socioeconomic position.

    Method: Baseline data from the Swedish Level of Living Survey and follow-up data from the Swedish Longitudinal Study ofLiving Conditions of the Oldest Old were combined, resulting in 20+ years of follow-up. Data were analyzed using ordered logistic regressions.

    Results: Higher occupational complexity was associated with less psychological distress 20 years later adjusted for age, sex, follow-up year, hours worked the year before baseline, and psychological distress at baseline. Higher socioeconomic position yielded the same pattern of results. Socioeconomic position partially accounted for the association between occupational complexity and psychological distress.

    Discussion: With social gradient not easily amenable to modification, efforts to increase engagement at work may offer a viable option to attenuate the influence of work environment on psychological distress later in life.

  • 7.
    Darin-Mattsson, Alexander
    et al.
    Karolinska Institutet, Sweden.
    Kåreholt, Ingemar
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Karolinska Institutet, Sweden.
    Andel, Ross
    University of South Florida, Tampa, USA.
    Economic hardship and income before retirement in relation to anxiety and depression in older adulthood. (2015) Work-related stress in midlife and all-cause mortality: the role of sense of coherence.2015In: Life Courses in Cross-­National Comparison: Similarities and Differences: Abstract book, 2015, p. 69-Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 8. Eriksson, Henrik
    et al.
    Sandberg, Jonas
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science.
    Pringle, Keith
    “It feels like a defoliation…”: Older men’s notions of informal support as primary caregivers2008In: Nordic Journal for Masculinity Studies, ISSN 1890-2138, Vol. 3, no 1, p. 48-61Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Little interest has been given to painting a broader picture of men’s relation tocaring and care giving activities and when it has, it has often tended to upholdstereotypic notions regarding men’s attitudes to caring activities. This articleexplores older men’s account of becoming and being primary caregivers as a resultof unexpected life events. By interviewing eleven older men in three focus groupsessions questions about masculinity and the cultural understanding about beingolder men in relation to caregiving and support was approached. In our result wedescribe the caregiving men’s social and personal changes as a consequences ofcaregiving as a defoliation process where the difficulty in upholding relationshipswith unconventional men and the caregiving men’s difficulty in upholdingrelations with people, who embrace hegemonic ideals about masculinity, is framingtheir lives as caregiving men.From this position caregiving men reach out and connect with other men whoshare the same experiences. We suggest that in the network of men who are, and isabout to become, primary caregivers, the principle of “paying it forward” seems tobe understood as the most valued support. Paying it forward help the men touphold their caring experience as valuable and gives the men a position as skilled.

  • 9.
    Eriksson, Simon
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Disciplinary Research.
    Varför är urban utforskning intressant?2013Independent thesis Basic level (professional degree), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 10.
    Eriksson, Sören
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Marketing and Logistics.
    The technological state in Indonesia – the co-constitution of high technology and authoritarian politics2013In: Asian Geographer, ISSN 1022-5706 (Print) 2158-1762 (Online), Vol. 30, no 2, p. 181-182Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 11.
    Evans, Kiah L.
    et al.
    Edith Cowan University, Perth, Australia.
    Millsteed, Jeannine
    Edith Cowan University, Perth, Australia.
    Richmond, Janet E.
    Edith Cowan University, Perth, Australia.
    Falkmer, Marita
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation.
    Falkmer, Torbjörn
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Girdler, Sonya J.
    Edith Cowan University, Perth, Australia.
    The impact of within and between role experiences on role balance outcomes for working Sandwich Generation Women2019In: Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy, ISSN 1103-8128, E-ISSN 1651-2014, Vol. 26, no 3, p. 184-193Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Women combining paid employment with dual caring responsibilities for children and aging parents, otherwise known as the sandwich generation, experience both benefits and costs related to role participation and quality of life. However, previous literature is inconclusive regarding the impact of this role combination on role balance. In the context of these mixed findings on role balance for working sandwich generation women, this study aimed to explore how within role characteristics and between role interactions are related to role balance for these women. This aim was achieved through the use of a questionnaire administered to 18 Australian working sandwich generation women. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics and correlation coefficients, with findings suggesting the women studied tended to experience neither role balance or role imbalance. Within-role characteristics, particularly within the mother and family member roles, were related to role balance. In addition, between-role conflict and role interactions involving either the home maintainer or family member roles had the greatest impact on role balance.

  • 12.
    Gunnarsson, Nina Veetnisha
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. SALVE (Social challenges, Actors, Living conditions, reseach VEnue). Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Social Work.
    Hemmingsson, Helena
    Linköpings universitet.
    Hydén, Lars-Christer
    Linköpings universitet.
    Mothers' accounts of healthcare encounters: Negotiating culpability and fulfilling the active mother role2013In: Discourse & Society, ISSN 0957-9265, E-ISSN 1460-3624, Vol. 24, no 4, p. 446-460Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article explores mothers’ accounts of initial interactions and encounters with healthcare professionals and the outcomes where questions about their children’s problems are concerned. A case-based storyline was reconstructed as part of the analysis, focusing on when and how mothers claimed to be responsible parents. The outcomes of these encounters were presented by the mothers in this study as a drawn-out process, with disagreement between mothers and healthcare providers, resulting in different performances of moral agency. Some mothers portrayed themselves as dependent on healthcare expertise and made moral claims by attributing and deflecting blame, negotiating back and forth about their own and the healthcare professionals’ culpability, restoring moral agency. Other mothers did not generally defend or justify their actions or place blame, but appealed instead to fulfilment of the active mother role where they controlled the interaction and claimed full responsibility for their child’s care, hence presenting their moral agency as indisputable.                 

  • 13.
    Hedman, Karl
    Lund university.
    Managing Medical Emergency Calls2016Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This dissertation is a conversation analytic examination of recurrent practices of interaction in medicalemergency calls. The study expands the analytical focus in past research on emergency calls betweenemergency call operators and callers to pre-hospital emergency care interaction on the phone betweennurses, physicians and callers. The investigation is based on ethnographic fieldwork in a Swedish emergencycontrol centre. The data used for the study consists primarily of audio recordings of medical emergency calls.Fundamental procedures in medical emergency calls examined in the dissertation are: (1) questioning; (2)emotion management; (3) risk management and (4) instruction giving. Emergency call-takers ask questions toelicit descriptions by callers of what is happening and to manage symptoms of patients to help keep them safeuntil ambulance crews arrive. In the questioning practice about acutely ill or injured patients call-takers usemainly yes-no questions and clarify problems by questioning callers making a distinction between defined andundefined problems. The analysis reveals four core types of emotion management practices: (1) call-takerskeep themselves calm when managing callers’ social displays of emotions; (2) promising ambulanceassistance; (3) providing problem solving presentations including emergency response measures to concernsof callers, and (4) emphasising the positive to create hope for callers. Call-takers use seven key procedures tomanage risk in medical emergency calls: (1) risk listening through active listening after actual and possiblerisks; (2) risk questioning; (3) risk identification; (4) risk monitoring; (5) risk assessment; (6) making decisionsabout elicited risk and (7) risk reduction. Instruction giving using directives and recommendations isaccomplished by call-takers in four main ways: (1) acute flow maintaining instruction giving when callers areprocedurally out of line; (2) measure oriented instructions for patient care and emergency responsemanagement; (3) organisational response instructions and (4) summarising instruction giving. Callers routinelyacknowledge risk identifications and follow instructions delivered by call-takers to examine statuses and lifesigns of patients such as breathing, movement and pulse, and perform basic first aid and emergency responsemeasures.The findings generated from this study will be useful in emergency call-taker training in carrying out interactiveprocedures in medical emergency calls and add to the larger research programmes on on-telephoneinteraction between professionals and citizen callers. This is an essential book for pre-hospital emergency careproviders and institutional interaction researchers and students.

  • 14.
    Heikkinen, Satu
    et al.
    Department of Social and Psychological Studies, Karlstad University, Karlstad, Sweden.
    Nilsson, Magnus
    Department of Social Work, University of Gotheburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Ageism and Power: Explicit and Implicit Assumptions on Power in the Literature on Ageism2017Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 15.
    Koutsogeorgou, Eleni
    et al.
    Neurological Institute Carlo Besta IRCCS Foundation, Milan, Italy.
    Maxwell, Gregor
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Aluas, Maria
    Centre for Bioethics, Babes-Bolyai University, Cluj-Napoca, Romania.
    Moretti, Marta
    Zurich University of Teacher Education, Switzerland.
    Quintas, Rui
    Neurological Institute Carlo Besta IRCCS Foundation, Milan, Italy.
    Evaluating social capital indicators and national inclusive education policies in six European countries2012In: International Journal of Inclusive Education, ISSN 1360-3116, E-ISSN 1464-5173Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper investigates how measures of social capital correspond with inclusive education policies by linking both to the ICF-CY. The method employs cross-country comparative analyses of six European countries – Germany, Greece, Romania, Spain, Sweden, and the United Kingdom – based on social capital indicators from the European Social Survey (Round 4-2008), along with comparison on the level of inclusive education policies within these countries by analyzing policies from a participation perspective. The results indicate that the ICF-CY is a useful tool for measuring both social capital and inclusive education policies, and although no connections could be drawn between social capital and inclusive education policy, the ICF-CY provided a consistent and common language for describing health and its related topics.

  • 16.
    Kåreholt, Ingemar
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology.
    A life-course with financial hardship and psychological distress in old age: A cohort study with Swedish data.2015Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 17.
    Kåreholt, Ingemar
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology.
    Midlife work-related stress increases dementia risk in late-life: The CAIDE 30-year study.2015Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 18.
    Kåreholt, Ingemar
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Karolinska institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Darin Mattsson, Alexander
    Nilsen, Charlotta
    Are socioeconomic position, work stress, and work complexity associated to mobility after retirement?2014In: International Journal of behavioral medicine: Abstracts from the ICBM 2014 Meeting, Springer, 2014, Vol. 21, p. 154-154Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 19.
    Kåreholt, Ingemar
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Aging Research Center, Karolinska Institutet and Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Nilsen, Charlotta
    Aging Research Center, Karolinska Institutet and Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Darin-Mattsson, Alexander
    Aging Research Center, Karolinska Institutet and Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Andel, Ross
    School of Aging Studies, University of South Florida, Tampa, Florida, USA ; International Clinical Research Center, St. Anne’s University Hospital, Brno, Czech Republic.
    Are socioeconomic position and working conditions before retirement age related to physical function 20 years later after retirement?2015In: Differences, Inequalities and Sociological Imagination: ESA 2015 12th conference of the European Sociological Association: Abstract book, European Sociological Association (ESA). I nstitute of Sociology of the Czech Academy of Scienc es (IS CAS) , 2015, p. 107-107Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    INTRODUCTION: Socioeconomic position and working situation are two factors associated to health inequalities and to each other.AIM: To study how socioeconomic position and working conditions 20+ years earlier associates to physical functioning after retirement age.DATA: Swedish nationally representative samples, from 1968, 1981, and 1991 were re-interviewed 1992, 2002, and 2011 (76+) with 20-24 years follow-up time (women, n=431; men, n=450).METHOD: Ordered logistic regressions, censored normal regression, and ordinary OLS regressions will be used.VARIABLES: Physical function: Self-reported mobility, objective tests of lung function and general physical function.Socioeconomic position: Education, income, cash margin, social class based on occupation, and an index based on all measures.Psychosocial working conditions: job control, psychological demands, high strain (low control+high demands) and work complexity regarding data (information), people, and substantive (general) complexity.Controls: age, sex, follow-up year, mobility at baseline, and hours worked.RESULTS: Job control, work complexity with data and people and all measures of SEP, were significantly associated to the three measures of physical function. Controlling for working conditions, the only significant associations was between general physical function and cash margin and the socioeconomic index respectively. When controlling for socioeconomic position, job control was significantly associated to less limitations in mobility and general physical functioning, substantive complexity and complexity with data were associated to less mobility limitations.CONCLUSIONS: Both socioeconomic position, work related stress, and work complexity were associated to physical function in old age, but only partly independent of each other. The strongest single factor is job control.

  • 20.
    Larsson, Anna
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Parent-Child Relations as Protective and Promotive Factors for Ethnic Minority Children Living in Relative Poverty: A systematic literature review2019Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Ethnic minority children living in relative poverty are a high-risk group for poor outcomes in all aspects of wellbeing. The relationship and interactions between child and parent are a key part of child development and a platform for providing positive experiences which can benefit a child’s wellbeing. There is therefore a need to identify what facilitates wellbeing for ethnic minority children in low-socioeconomic status families. By focusing on protective and promotive factors encompassing the parent-child relationship, factors can be identified which can use family strengths as a basis for interventions and practice within healthcare, social work and education, which is what this systematic literature review set out to do. Through a diligent search of the literature, 12 articles were identified for review according to the inclusion and exclusion criteria, containing research on African American, Roma, Native American and Hispanic/Latino youth. The results inform how child wellbeing can be facilitated through several parental factors, including parental involvement and support, maternal attachment, paternal warmth and ethnic identity and ethnic socialization. The findings also indicate a need for further studies on paternal influence on wellbeing in especially Native American and Roma youth, as well as the impact of ethnic socialization on youth wellbeing. Parents have an important role to play in child wellbeing and are vital partners alongside the child when planning interventions. Considerations naturally need to be shown for each ethnic minority, the child’s setting and its individual characteristics. 

  • 21.
    Malisa, Amedeus
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics.
    Persistence of Social Exclusion in Tanzania2019In: Efficiency, equity and well-being in selected African countries / [ed] Pia Nilsson & Almas Heshmati, Cham: Springer, 2019, p. 97-120Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Social exclusion can be defined as a practice where individuals are fully or partially excluded from social, economic and cultural networks. Hence, the concept of social exclusion is multidimensional and associated with economic, social, political and cultural aspects. This paper analyses the causes of social exclusion. It specifically explores the reasons why an individual experiences social exclusion today on the assumption that this may lead to similar experiences in the future. Literature suggests that there are two underlying processes that lead to the persistence of social exclusion. One, individuals are heterogeneous in terms of observed and unobserved adverse characteristics which are important for someone to experience social exclusion over time. Second, individuals may experience social exclusion due to state dependency, that is, the experience of social exclusion in one period may itself incite the chances of experiencing it in subsequent periods. Differentiating the two processes is important because policy options for addressing the two social exclusion processes are also different. Using data from the Tanzania National Panel Survey (TZNPS), this paper provides new evidence on the state of social exclusion in Tanzania. 

  • 22.
    Nilsen, Charlotta
    et al.
    Karolinska Institutet and Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Agahi, Neda
    Karolinska Institutet and Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Kåreholt, Ingemar
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Karolinska Institutet and Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Midlife work-related stress and late life physical functioning: a 20-year prospective cohort study2015In: 'Life Courses in Cross-­National Comparison: Similarities and Differences': Abstract book, 2015, p. 14-Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 23.
    Nilsen, Charlotta
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Fritzell, Johan
    Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Kåreholt, Ingemar
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology.
    Andel, Ross
    University of South Florida, USA.
    Work-related stress in midlife and all-cause mortality: the role of sense of coherence2015In: 'Life Courses in Cross-­National Comparison: Similarities and Differences: Abstract book, 2015, p. 125-Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 24. Nilsson, Magnus
    Nationalism and the Moral Economy of Ageing2017In: Framing Age: Contested Knowledge in Science and Politics / [ed] Iris Loffeier, Benoît Majerus and Thibauld Moulaert, Abingdon, Oxon: Routledge, 2017Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 25.
    Nilsson, Pia
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre for Entrepreneurship and Spatial Economics (CEnSE).
    Heshmati, Almas
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics.
    Introduction and Summary2019In: Efficiency, equity and well-being in selected African countries / [ed] Pia Nilsson & Almas Heshmati, Cham: Springer, 2019, p. 1-8Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This volume is a collection of studies on poverty and well-being, vulnerability to poverty, women’s empowerment and smallholders’ efficiency in selected African countries. It has a collection of 12 empirical studies that have an overall focus on poverty, well-being and vulnerability to poverty and includes contributions by 19 authors. The studies aim at increasing our knowledge about the factors that influence poverty and well-being. This is important as it can help alleviate many of the persistent challenges observed across Africa. © Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019.

  • 26.
    Nordström (Avby), Gunilla
    Linköpings universitet, HELIX Vinn Excellence Centre.
    Professionalism encounters Evidence-based Practice (EBP): What effects can EBP have on knowledge use and learning in professional practice?2011Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Today it is common to talk about “lean organizations”, where focus lays on cost efficiency and resource allocation. In professional work, e.g. in healthcare and social services the trend is referred to as New Public Management (NPM), involving considerable structural changes and an inevitable shift towards a more quantitatively oriented mode of decision making. Especially the social care is under the loop for changes; striving to create a practice, measurable, knowledgeable and with the ability to demonstrate the efficiency of its methods and efforts; referred to as EBP. With an exclusive focus on task performance the value of workers´ ability to conceptualize problems and solutions and engage creatively with families in their historical and social context is undermined. The rules constituting the arguments in practical reasoning are becoming more and more structured. Related to theories of how professionals develop abstractions to create powerful knowledge systems the introduction of EBP could in fact have a negative effect on knowledge use and learning. More stringent methods may lessen the room for discretion, in turn circumscribing the professional knowledge and with this making professional expertize needless in executing the work. 

    The aim with this paper is to explore possible consequences of introducing EBP in professional practice (social work). The paper is divided into two parts. While the first part touches key concepts and theories of relevance, the following will analyze EBP’s possible effects on knowledge use and learning from aspects of significance; involving different research traditions, implementation strategies and situational aspects for discretion and learning. The paper concludes in a discussion of consequences following with the growing transparency and rationalization-movement.

  • 27.
    Olausson, Ulrika
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Media and Communication Studies.
    Uggla, Ylva
    School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Celebrities celebrifying nature: the discursive construction of the human-nature relationship in the ‘Nature Is Speaking’ campaign2019In: Celebrity Studies, ISSN 1939-2397, E-ISSN 1939-2400Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The nature conservation movement frequently relies on the lustre of celebrity personae to reach out with its message. As role models, celebrities exercise invisible power by representing certain norms and ideas while themselves being subordinate to social structures and discourses. Examining the case of Conservation International’s campaign, Nature Is Speaking, and guided by the methodological framework of multimodal critical discourse analysis, this study examines how celebrities, in alliance with the conservation movement, (re)produce certain ideas about nature and the human-nature relationship when discursively ‘celebrifying’ nature – turning nature into a ‘celebrity by association’ – by lending their celebrity properties to nature as represented in the campaign. The study identifies three ways of representing nature that the celebrification of nature produces in the campaign: nature as (1) eternal and magnificent, (2) caring and providing, and (3) mighty but delicate. Together these representations constitute a discourse that reproduces certain naturalised values and worldviews connected to the human-nature relationship. The paper concludes that the diversification of celebrity into new fields such as the natural is constitutive of the overall celebritisation of society, and it discusses the implications of the celebrification of nature in terms of reproduction of the human-nature dichotomy and obscuration of the structural aspects of environmental degradation.

  • 28.
    Persson, Roland S
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Lifelong learning/Encell.
    A voice of sanity in the arid land of dogmatic systems2015In: International Journal for Talent Development and Creativity, ISSN 2291-7179, Vol. 3, no 2, p. 65-70Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    No abstract

  • 29.
    Persson, Roland S.
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Lifelong learning/Encell.
    Human Nature: The Unpredictable Variable in Engineering the Future2016In: Giftedness and Talent in the 21st Century: Adapting to the Turbulence of Globalization / [ed] Don Ambrose & Robert J. Sternberg, Rotterdam: Sense Publishers, 2016, 1, p. 65-80Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 30.
    Torgé, Cristina Joy
    Linköpings universitet, NISAL - Nationella institutet för forskning om äldre och åldrande.
    Using conjoint interviews with couples that have been living with disabilities and illnesses for a long time – implications and insights2013In: Qualitative Studies, ISSN 1903-7031, E-ISSN 1903-7031, Vol. 4, no 2, p. 100-113Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article discusses conjoint interviews and takes its starting point from a study with nine older couples who have been living with disabilities for a long period of time. Conjoint interviewing where dyads are interviewed together produces a different kind of data from individual interviews – specifically data that conduce different ways of talking about “we-ness” and produce interaction between the participants. This article discusses how this appeared in a study that was interested in the understandings and actualizations of spousal care when both have a disability or illness. The method leads to an analysis centered on mutuality and has potential to problematize traditional caring tasks and caring roles in the context of living with disability or chronic illness. Potentials and limitations of the method are discussed.

  • 31.
    Wells, Michael B.
    et al.
    Uppsala universitet, Sweden.
    Bergnehr, Disa
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för tema, Tema Barn. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten..
    Families and family policies in Sweden2014In: Handbook of Family Policies Across the Globe / [ed] Mihaela Robila, New York: Springer , 2014, p. 91-107Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Sweden is known as a social welfare state, whereby the people who reside in Sweden are entitled to certain public benefits at little or no cost to the individual. Over the past century, Sweden has reshaped its culture, growing from one of the poorest nations in Europe to a flourishing country that others emulate, especially with respect to their family policies. Sweden has developed several foundational family policies that have helped to encourage equality, while establishing a sense of individuality. Sweden has created similar rights for cohabiters/married couples, as well as for same-sex/opposite-sex couples. Parents receive a generous parental leave package, flexible employment choices, and there is a low gender wage gap, while children receive high-quality childcare, free health care, free dental care, free mental health services, and a substantial child welfare program. Swedish family policies encourage both parents to work and to help each other with household and childcare tasks. Despite the public benefits that Sweden provides for mothers, fathers, and children, there is still a need for further improvements regarding policies on domestic violence, poverty, and child welfare. Assessments of Sweden’s family policies are discussed.

  • 32.
    Zawadzki, Michal
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jagiellonian University, Kraków.
    Jensen, Tommy
    Stockholm University.
    Darkness at Noon: Adiaphorization and Humiliation in the Neoliberal University2019Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    As researchers have observed, one of the side-effects of the neoliberal ethos in contemporary academia is humiliation in academic working life, related to undignifying social behaviours, including mobbing and bullying practices (Zawadzki, 2017; Twale, 2018). Neoliberal aims as publications in prestigious journals, grants or next academic degrees very often become the ends of themselves for academics, working as the “moral sleeping pills” (Bauman, 1991: 26), strengthening obedience towards neoliberal rules of academic excellence game. It creates an ultra-conformist monoculture and reduce the possibility to perceive the neoliberal ideology as a source of the observed and experienced unethical actions. In consequence, very often victims and witnesses of humiliation in academia perceive neoliberal changes as morally neutral, or adiaphorizing (Bauman, 1991), justifying the authority of managerial changes and seeing them as a solution to their harm (Stein, 2001). This might be understood as an example of what Stanley Milgram calls an “agentic shift” (Milgram, 1974/2005), where an individual “feels responsible to the authority directing him but feels no responsibility for the content of the actions that the authority prescribes” (ibid.: 147).

    The aim of the paper is to reflect on the social context of humiliation as a consequence of neoliberal changes in academia within the use of Zygmunt Bauman’s ideas of adiaphorization and scientific management as a producer of the horrific (Jensen, 2010; 2011, 2014). The paper is based on empirical findings on Polish university, affected by nation-wide neoliberal reforms and currently undergoing local, management-led, organizational change.

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