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  • 1.
    Kävrestad, Joakim
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Department of Computer Science and Informatics.
    Birath, Marcus
    School of Informatics, University of Skövde, Skövde, Sweden.
    Clarke, Nathan
    School of Engineering, Computing and Mathematics, University of Plymouth, Plymouth, UK.
    Fundamentals of digital forensics: A guide to theory, research and applications2024 (ed. 3. ed.)Book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This textbook describes the theory and methodology of digital forensic examinations, presenting examples developed in collaboration with police authorities to ensure relevance to real-world practice. The coverage includes discussions on forensic artifacts and constraints, as well as forensic tools used for law enforcement and in the corporate sector. Emphasis is placed on reinforcing sound forensic thinking, and gaining experience in common tasks through hands-on exercises.

    This enhanced third edition describes practical digital forensics with open-source tools and includes an outline of current challenges and research directions.

    Topics and features:

    • Outlines what computer forensics is, and what it can do, as well as what its limitations are
    • Discusses both the theoretical foundations and the fundamentals of forensic methodology
    • Reviews broad principles that are applicable worldwide
    • Explains how to find and interpret several important artifacts
    • Describes free and open-source software tools
    • Features content on corporate forensics, ethics, SQLite databases, triage, and memory analysis
    • Includes new supporting video lectures on YouTube 

    This easy-to-follow primer is an essential resource for students of computer forensics, and will also serve as a valuable reference for practitioners seeking instruction on performing forensic examinations.

  • 2.
    Levin, Sara K.
    et al.
    Regional Forensic Psychiatric Hospital, Vadstena, Sweden.
    Nilsen, Per
    Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Bendtsen, Preben
    Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Bülow, Per
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Social Work. Department of Psychiatry, Ryhov County Hospital, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Adherence to planned risk management interventions in Swedish forensic care: What is said and done according to patient records2019In: International Journal of Law and Psychiatry, ISSN 0160-2527, E-ISSN 1873-6386, Vol. 64, p. 71-82Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Both structured and unstructured clinical risk assessments within forensic care aim to prevent violence by informing risk management, but research about their preventive role is inconclusive. The aim of this study was to investigate risk management interventions that were planned and realized during forensic care by analysing patient records. Records from a forensic clinic in Sweden, covering 14 patients and 526 months, were reviewed. Eight main types of risk management interventions were evaluated by content analysis: monitoring, supervision, assessment, treatment, victim protection, acute coercion, security level and police interventions. Most planned risk management interventions were realized, both in structured and clinical risk assessments. However, most realized interventions were not planned, making them more open to subjective decisions. Analysing risk management interventions actually planned and realized in clinical settings can reveal the preventive role of structured risk assessments and how different interventions mediate violence risk. 

  • 3.
    Levin, Sara K.
    et al.
    Department of Forensic Psychiatry, Linköping University, Vadstena, Sweden.
    Nilsen, Per
    Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Bendtsen, Preben
    Department of Medical Specialist, Linköping University, Motala, Sweden.
    Bülow, Per
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. SALVE (Social challenges, Actors, Living conditions, reseach VEnue). Department of Psychiatry, Ryhov County Hospital, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Staff perceptions of facilitators and barriers to the use of a short-term risk assessment instrument in forensic psychiatry2018In: Journal of Forensic Psychology Practice, ISSN 1522-8932, E-ISSN 1522-9092, Vol. 18, no 3, p. 199-228Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Prospective adverse events within forensic settings should be assessed using structured risk assessment instruments. Our aim was to identify the barriers and facilitators of a structured instrument for assessment of short-term risk within inpatient forensic psychiatric care. The instrument was piloted at a forensic psychiatric clinic. Three focus group interviews were conducted with staff. Content analysis revealed three main categories of barriers and facilitators for clinical use: implementation object, context, and users. Complexity of the instrument, insufficient continuous training and support, difficulties retrieving assessments on wards, and insecurity about translating assessments into actions were perceived barriers to clinical use. Routines for documentation improved communication and the inclusion of protective and short-term dynamic clinical factors were perceived as clinically relevant. Problem-solving ability, attitude, and motivation of staff were facilitating factors. Comprehensive risk assessment instruments require substantial support for staff to find them manageable. Systematic documentation is required to measure actual daily clinical use.

  • 4.
    Lindqvist, Gunnar
    et al.
    Högskolan i Skövde, Institutionen för informationsteknologi.
    Kävrestad, Joakim
    Högskolan i Skövde, Institutionen för informationsteknologi.
    How Privacy Concerns Impact Swedish Citizens’ Willingness to Report Crimes2022In: Human Aspects of Information Security and Assurance: 16th IFIP WG 11.12 International Symposium, HAISA 2022, Mytilene, Lesbos, Greece, July 6–8, 2022, Proceedings / [ed] Nathan Clarke; Steven Furnell, Cham: Springer Nature Switzerland AG , 2022, p. 209-217Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In today’s information technology-driven world, most criminal acts leave digital evidence. In such cases, cooperation through the handover of digital devices such as mobile phones from victims is a success factor that enables evidence-seeking through digital forensics. Unfortunately, forensic examinations of devices can become an additional negative consequence due to privacy invasion. Privacy invasion can make crime victims less cooperative and less willing to report crimes. To address this problem, we surveyed 400 Swedish adults to identify their hypothetical willingness to report certain crimes. The survey examined the impact a mobile phone handover made on the willingness to report a crime. Our findings demonstrate that mobile phone handover resulted in a significantly lower willingness to report crimes. However, the data could not show privacy as a common tendency cause. The presented results can be used as a reference for further research on attitudes and behaviours regarding the subject. 

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