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  • 1.
    Abbas, Päivi Maria
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Stockholms stad.
    Kommunala riktlinjer för anhöriganställningar: En kvalitativ innehållsanalys med feministisk teoriansats2016Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The overall aim was to investigate municipal guidelines for paid dependent care which were available online, i.e. documents regarding situations where a relative is hired to care for a next-to-kin. The overall aim has been built on the following three research questions regarding how municipalities describe: 1) which situations qualify for paid dependent care, 2) how the elderly person’s needs are met in case of paid dependent care and 3) how the dependent caregivers’ rights and well-being are ensured?

    There is no legal basis for demanding cash-for-care setting, and the local self-government determines whether the municipality offers this form of care. Recently, paid dependent care has been restricted and banned in several Swedish municipalities, and according to some statistics paid dependent care is allowed in 55–65 % of the Swedish municipalities. It is mostly women of foreign origin who are dependent caregivers nowadays, and feminist care research and the media lift up cash-for-care settings as a trap for women and for migrant integration.

    The study included guidelines from a total of 21 municipalities, which were analyzed using qualitative content analysis according to Elo & Kyngäs (2007). The guidelines analysed were found from the websites of Sweden's 121 medium and large municipalities (more than 20 000 inhabitants). The results were processed using feminist theory (Hirdman 2012).

    The results show that overall there are few guidelines available in Sweden's municipalities and that the regulations differ in the different municipalities’ guidelines. The guidelines that are available often contain general or vague descriptions. One conclusion is therefore that many municipalities ensure their own discretion and prevail through vague and general rules in their guidelines. From a feminist perspective, these different municipal policies create unfair structures and differences in conditions and terms for the elderly and their family caregivers regarding cash-for-care settings. Finally, the result shows that the few detailed descriptions prioritize elder people's rights over their caregivers'. Ensuring the paid dependent caregivers’ rights is mainly described to be done by checking and controlling them. In other words, the paid dependent caregivers are often invisible in the guidelines, are often regarded as pseudo-employees and therefore fall between the cracks in terms of their need for support (Sand 2010).

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    Abbas, P.M. (2016)
  • 2.
    Abdulhasan Looli, Intisar
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Department of Odontology and Oral Health Science.
    Oral hälsa hos barn och ungdomar med Downs syndrom: En litteraturstudie2023Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: The aim of this literature study was to investigate oral health in children and adolescents with Down syndrome.

    Method: The study is a general literature study where the searches were carried out in the databases CINAHL, MEDLINE and Dentistry & oral sciences source (DOSS). Scientific articles that responded to the purpose of the study were selected based on inclusion and exclusion criteria and relevant keywords. Results: A total of 22 quantitative studies were reviewed which showed that children and adolescents with Down syndrome had poorer oral hygiene, more oral diseases and malocclusions compared to children and adolescents without Down syndrome. The reported oral diseases/conditions were caries, gingivitis, periodontitis, oral candidosis, malocclusions, attrition, agenesis and dental erosion. Risk factors that can influence the development of oral diseases and malocclusions, for example, oral hygiene habits and oral motor factors. Conclusion: Children and young people with Down syndrome have an increased risk of suffering from oral diseases and malocclusions. Through increased knowledge about the oral health of children and young people with Down syndrome, dental hygienists can work preventively and motivate support and care for this risk group.

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    Oral hälsa hos barn och ungdomar med Downs syndrom
  • 3.
    Abellan, Antonio
    et al.
    Centre for Human and Social Sciences, Spanish National Research Council, Madrid, Spain.
    Perez, Julio
    Centre for Human and Social Sciences, Spanish National Research Council, Madrid, Spain.
    Pujol, Rogelio
    Centre for Human and Social Sciences, Spanish National Research Council, Madrid, Spain.
    Sundström, Gerdt
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ARN-J (Aging Research Network - Jönköping). Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. SALVE (Social challenges, Actors, Living conditions, reseach VEnue).
    Jegermalm, Magnus
    School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Dalarna University, Falun, Sweden.
    Malmberg, Bo
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ARN-J (Aging Research Network - Jönköping).
    Partner care, gender equality, and ageing in Spain and Sweden2017In: International Journal of Ageing and Later Life, E-ISSN 1652-8670, Vol. 11, no 1, p. 69-89Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We used national surveys to study how older persons’ changing household patterns influence the gender balance of caregiving in two countries with distinct household structures and cultures, Spain and Sweden. In both countries, men and women provide care equally often for their partner in couple-only households. This has become the most common household type among older persons in Spain and prevails altogether in Sweden. This challenges the traditional dominance of young or middle-aged women as primary caregivers in Spain. In Sweden, many caregivers are old themselves. We focus attention to partners as caregivers and the consequences of changing household structures for caregiving, which may be on the way to gender equality in both countries, with implications for families and for the public services.

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  • 4. Abellán, Antonio
    et al.
    Ayala, Alba
    Pérez, Julio
    Pujol, Rogelio
    Sundström, Gerdt
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. SALVE (Social challenges, Actors, Living conditions, reseach VEnue). Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ARN-J (Aging Research Network - Jönköping).
    Ramos, María
    The new carers2018In: Ageing and care: How will we live and care for ourselves when we get old?, Palma: Observatorio Sociale de "la caxia" , 2018, p. 25-31Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Usually it is women who take care of family members in the home, but with age, gender differences become less pronounced and, from 80 years onwards, there are more men caring for a family member – generally their partner – than women. Social and demographic changes are presenting new challenges for public services. In particular, in two-person households with elderly inhabitants, one of whom is dependent, it is necessary to tackle not only the needs of the dependent partner but also those of the carer partner. For this reason, carer support programmes are needed.

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    Fulltext
  • 5.
    Abelsson, Anna
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science.
    Odestrand, Per
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science.
    Nygårdh, Annette
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, The Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. IMPROVE (Improvement, innovation, and leadership in health and welfare).
    To strengthen self-confidence as a step in improving prehospital youth laymen basic life support2020In: BMC Emergency Medicine, ISSN 1471-227X, E-ISSN 1471-227X, Vol. 20, no 1, article id 8Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND:

    A rapid emergency care intervention can prevent the cardiac arrest from resulting in death. In order for Cardio Pulmonary Resuscitation (CPR) to have any real significance for the survival of the patient, it requires an educational effort educating the large masses of people of whom the youth is an important part. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of a two-hour education intervention for youth regarding their self-confidence in performing Adult Basic Life Support (BLS).

    METHODS:

    A quantitative approach where data consist of a pre- and post-rating of seven statements by 50 participants during an intervention by means of BLS theoretical and practical education.

    RESULTS:

    The two-hour training resulted in a significant improvement in the participants' self-confidence in identifying a cardiac arrest (pre 51, post 90), to perform compressions (pre 65, post 91) and ventilations (pre 64, post 86) and use a defibrillator (pre 61, post 81). In addition, to have the self-confidence to be able to perform, and to actually perform, first aid to a person suffering from a traumatic event was significantly improved (pre 54, post 89).

    CONCLUSION:

    By providing youth with short education sessions in CPR, their self-confidence can be improved. This can lead to an increased will and ability to identify a cardiac arrest and to begin compressions and ventilations. This also includes having the confidence using a defibrillator. Short education sessions in first aid can also lead to increased self-confidence, resulting in young people considering themselves able to perform first aid to a person suffering from a traumatic event. This, in turn, results in young people perceiveing themselves as willing to commence an intervention during a traumatic event. In summary, when the youth believe in their own knowledge, they will dare to intervene.

  • 6.
    Adanko, Carina
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Built Environment.
    Küller, Marianne
    Lunds universitet, LTH, Inst arkitektur och byggd miljö, Miljöpsykologi.
    LED-belysning och brukaren2014Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Lighting research is diversified and includes theory and methodology from disciplines as different as technology, medicine and social sciences. There is also an expectation on research results to be directly applicable in real environments. The introduction of LED has furthermore made previous research on incandescent lamps, fluorescent lamps and other light sources, outdated.    New knowledge – and new research – is needed.

    An inventory of current LED-research was made during 2013. The result of this inventory is the basis of the research review here presented. The presentation includes more than 400 articles, reported under the headings: The biological clock; Flicker and dimming of LED: Energy efficiency: daylight and lighting control; Colour rendering; Glare, and finally; Perceived lighting qualities.

    Underlying theoretical considerations as well as actual knowledge are presented in the text of the different sections, and references are given to relevant research publications. All publications have been provided with two or more keywords in Swedish, describing the content of the publication. After the text given under each heading the references supporting this text are presented. In the final section all LED-publications are given in alphabetical order according to author and with keywords. 

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    Adanko, Küller LED-belysning och brukaren
  • 7.
    Adolfsson, Margareta
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Johnson, Ensa
    Centre for Augmentative and Alternative Communication, University of Pretoria, South Africa.
    Nilsson, Stefan
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Pain management for children with cerebral palsy in school settings in two cultures: Action and reaction approaches2018In: Disability and Rehabilitation, ISSN 0963-8288, E-ISSN 1464-5165, Vol. 40, no 18, p. 2152-2162Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Children with cerebral palsy (CP) face particular challenges, e.g. daily pain that threaten their participation in school activities. This study focuses on how teachers, personal assistants, and clinicians in two countries with different cultural prerequisites, Sweden and South Africa, manage the pain of children in school settings.

    Method: Participants’ statements collected in focus groups were analysed using a directed qualitative content analysis framed by a Frequency of attendance-Intensity of involvement model, which was modified into a Knowing-Doing model.

    Results: Findings indicated that pain management focused more on children’s attendance in the classroom than on their involvement, and a difference between countries in terms of action-versus-reaction approaches. Swedish participants reported action strategies to prevent pain whereas South African participants primarily discussed interventions when observing a child in pain.

    Conclusion: Differences might be due to school- and healthcare systems. To provide effective support when children with CP are in pain in school settings, an action-and-reaction approach would be optimal and the use of alternative and augmentative communication strategies would help to communicate children’s pain. As prevention of pain is desired, structured surveillance and treatment programs are recommended along with trustful collaboration with parents and access to “hands-on” pain management when needed.

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  • 8.
    Agahi, Neda
    et al.
    Aging Research Center, Karolinska Institutet/Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Kelfve, Susanne
    Aging Research Center, Karolinska Institutet/Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden; Department of Sociology, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Lennartsson, Carin
    Aging Research Center, Karolinska Institutet/Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Kåreholt, Ingemar
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ARN-J (Aging Research Network - Jönköping). Aging Research Center, Karolinska Institutet/Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Alcohol consumption in very old age and its association with survival: a matter of health and physical function2016In: Drug And Alcohol Dependence, ISSN 0376-8716, E-ISSN 1879-0046, Vol. 159, p. 240-245Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Alcohol consumption in very old age is increasing; yet, little is known about the personal and health-related characteristics associated with different levels of alcohol consumption and the association between alcohol consumption and survival among the oldest old.

    Methods

    Nationally representative data from the Swedish Panel Study of Living Conditions of the Oldest Old (SWEOLD, ages 76-101; n = 863) collected in 2010/2011 were used. Mortality was analyzed until 2014. Alcohol consumption was measured with questions about frequency and amount. Drinks per month were calculated and categorized as abstainer, light-to-moderate drinker (0.5–30 drinks/month) and heavy drinker (>30 drinks/month). Multinomial logistic regressions and Laplace regressions were performed.

    Results

    Compared to light-to-moderate drinkers, abstainers had lower levels of education and more functional health problems, while heavy drinkers were more often men, had higher levels of education, and no serious health or functional problems. In models adjusted only for age and sex, abstainers died earlier than drinkers. Among light-to-moderate drinkers, each additional drink/month was associated with longer survival, while among heavy drinkers, each additional drink/month was associated with shorter survival. However, after adjusting for personal and health-related factors, estimates were lower and no longer statistically significant.

    Conclusions

    The association between alcohol consumption and survival in very old age seems to have an inverse J-shape; abstention and heavy use is associated with shorter survival compared to light-to-moderate drinking. To a large extent, differences in survival are due to differences in baseline health and physical function.

    Graphical abstract

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  • 9.
    Agahi, Neda
    et al.
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Lennartsson, Carin
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Kåreholt, Ingemar
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Karolinska Institutet.
    Shaw, Benjamin A.
    School of Public Health, University at Albany, Rensselaer, NY, USA.
    Trajectories of social activities from middle age to old age and late-life disability: a 36-year follow-up2013In: Age and Ageing, ISSN 0002-0729, E-ISSN 1468-2834, Vol. 42, no 6, p. 790-793Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVES: to examine the association between 34-year trajectories of social activity, from middle age to old age and late-life disability.

    METHODS: data from the Swedish Level of Living Survey (LNU) and the Swedish Panel Study of the Oldest Old (SWEOLD) were used. LNU data from 1968, 1981, 1991 and 2000 were merged with SWEOLD data from 1992, 2002 and 2004 to create a longitudinal data set with five observation periods. Trajectories of social activities covered 1968-2002, and late-life disability was measured in 2004. The sample consisted of 729 individuals aged 33-61 at baseline (1968), who participated in at least four observation periods and who were free from mobility limitations at baseline. Four trajectories of social activity were identified and used as predictors of late-life disability.

    RESULTS: reporting low/medium levels of social activity from mid-life to old age was the most common trajectory group. Persons reporting continuously low/medium or decreasing levels of social activity had higher odds ratios for late-life disability (OR = 2.33 and OR = 2.15, respectively) compared with those having continuously high levels of activity, even when adjusting for age, sex and mobility limitations, and excluding persons with baseline mobility limitations.

    CONCLUSIONS: results suggest that the disability risk associated with social activities is related to recent levels of activity, but also that risk may accumulate over time, as indicated by the higher disability risk associated with the continuously low/medium level social activity trajectory.

  • 10.
    Ahlgren, Jennie
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Disciplinary Research.
    Görman, Ulf
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Disciplinary Research.
    Nordström, Karin
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Disciplinary Research.
    Ethical considerations in relation to personalised nutrition: An overview of Work Package 5, with respect to ethics2015Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The objectives of Food4Me work package 5 included a baseline assessment of the ethical and legal aspects of personalised nutrition at the start of the project in 2011, as well as a final assessment at the end of the project (2015), taking into account results achieved in other work packages. The initial assessment made a number of ethical issues visible, most of them relating to the consumer of personalised nutrition service. The results depicted in this publication indicate that many of the questions raised in relation to these issues remain unsolved, and in some cases they seem to be neglected in relation to the services offered by internet companies.

  • 11.
    Aidemark, Jan
    et al.
    Linnéuniversitetet.
    Askenäs, Linda
    Linnéuniversitetet.
    Mårtensson, Jan
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Department of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT.
    Strömberg, Anna
    Linköpings universitet.
    Challenges for heart failure patients’ self-care systems – analysis of patients’ needs2014In: Procedia Technology, E-ISSN 2212-0173, Vol. 16, p. 1256-1264Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Self-care is important for heart failure patients. However, what are the views of patients on their situation when it comes to realizing self-care? The aim of the paper is to investigate the self-care needs of HF patients, by understanding the issues they embrace in their self-care processes. In this paper we make a review of 17 interviews and make a classification of what the needs are for possible information technology support systems. Based on the analysis of these interviews, we identify the diversity of needs in support of activities related to different background conditions and the dynamics of change of learning and changes in the heart failure condition. The contribution of the paper is a framework for understanding the diversity of needs and the specific situations of this group of patients.

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  • 12. Al Ansari, A.
    et al.
    Strachan, K.
    Hashim, Sumaya
    RCSI Bahrain, Adliya, Kingdom of Bahrain.
    Otoom, S.
    Analysis of psychometric properties of the modified SETQ tool in undergraduate medical education2017In: BMC Medical Education, E-ISSN 1472-6920, Vol. 17, no 1, article id 56Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Effective clinical teaching is crucially important for the future of patient care. Robust clinical training therefore is essential to produce physicians capable of delivering high quality health care. Tools used to evaluate medical faculty teaching qualities should be reliable and valid. This study investigates the psychometric properties of modification of the System for Evaluation of Teaching Qualities (SETQ) instrument in the clinical years of undergraduate medical education.

    Methods: This cross-sectional multicenter study was conducted in four teaching hospitals in the Kingdom of Bahrain. Two-hundred ninety-eight medical students were invited to evaluate 105 clinical teachers using the SETQ instrument between January 2015 and March 2015. Questionnaire feasibility was analyzed using average time required to complete the form and the number of raters required to produce reliable results. Instrument reliability (stability) was assessed by calculating the Cronbach’s alpha coefficient for the total scale and for each sub-scale (factor). To provide evidence of construct validity, an exploratory factor analysis was conducted to identify which items on the survey belonged together, which were then grouped as factors.

    Results: One-hundred twenty-five medical students completed 1161 evaluations of 105 clinical teachers. The response rates were 42% for student evaluations and 57% for clinical teacher self-evaluations. The factor analysis showed that the questionnaire was composed of six factors, explaining 76.7% of the total variance. Cronbach’s alpha was 0.94 or higher for the six factors in the student survey; for the clinical teacher survey, Cronbach’s alpha was 0.88. In both instruments, the item-total correlation was above 0.40 for all items within their respective scales.

    Conclusion: Our modified SETQ questionnaire was found to be both reliable and valid, and was implemented successfully across various departments and specialties in different hospitals in the Kingdom of Bahrain.

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  • 13.
    Al Salek, Sarah
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare.
    Abdullah, Sanaa
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare.
    Tobakshjälpen – erfarenheter och upplevelser av tobaksavvänjning och dess samband med oral hälsa: En intervjustudie2021Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: The aim of this study was to describe informants’ experiences with Tobakshjälpen and oral health during or after using the digital service.  Method: The study was an empirical qualitative approach. Five informants in age group 24–61 were selected for the interviews according to suitability selection. The method for data collection was a semi-structured interview. The interviews were conducted digitally and analyzed using a qualitative content analysis with a manifest approach. Results: The recommendation for Tobakshjälpen from primary care and dental care was the primary reason for choosing the service. Previous experience with different tobacco ceasing methods also created curiosity and motivated patients to try a new method. Results established that there are both shortcomings and gains with the Tobakshjälpen. The shortcomings of the service included obstacles in the structure of the treatment process such as unclear questions and limiting digital functions. The benefits of Tobakshjälpen, on the other hand, were the good qualities of the therapists, the support of the service during the treatment process, and improvement in oral health and well-being. All informants were tobacco-free due to the collaboration between Tobakshjälpen and the drug Champix.

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  • 14.
    Alm Mårtensson, Anna
    et al.
    Länsstyrelsen i Jönköping.
    Boström, Anita
    Institutionen för hälsovetenskaper, Karlstads universitet.
    Lindmark, Ulrika
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dept. of Natural Science and Biomedicine. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Centre for Oral Health. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ARN-J (Aging Research Network - Jönköping).
    Lundgren, Charlie
    Länsstyrelsen Västerbotten.
    Ludvigsson, Mikael
    Linköpings universitet.
    Simmons, Johanna
    Medicinska och geriatriska akutkliniken, Universitetssjukhuset i Linköping.
    Att möta våldsutsatta äldre personer2022In: Äldre personers utsatthet för våld i nära relationer: Interprofessionella perspektiv / [ed] L. Östlund, Lund: Studentlitteratur AB, 2022, p. 183-220Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 15.
    Alm Mårtensson, Anna
    et al.
    Länsstyrelsen i Jönköping.
    Boström, Anita
    Institutionen för hälsovetenskaper, Karlstads universitet.
    Lindmark, Ulrika
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dept. of Natural Science and Biomedicine. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Centre for Oral Health. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ARN-J (Aging Research Network - Jönköping).
    Lundgren, Charlie
    Länsstyrelsen Västerbotten.
    Östlund, Lena
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ARN-J (Aging Research Network - Jönköping).
    Ansvarsområden för olika samhällsfunktioner2022In: Äldre personers utsatthet för våld i nära relationer: Interprofessionella perspektiv / [ed] L. Östlund, Lund: Studentlitteratur AB, 2022, p. 91-112Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 16.
    Almborg, Ann-Helene
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health.
    Perceived Participation in Discharge Planning and Health Related Quality of Life after Stroke2008Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The overall aim of this thesis was to investigate the patients’ and their relatives’ perceived participation in discharge planning after stroke and the patients’ health-related quality of life, depressive symptoms, performance of personal daily activities and social activities in connection with discharge. Another aim was to evaluate the psychometric assumptions of the SF-36 for Swedish stroke patients.

    Prospective, descriptive and cross-sectional designs were used to study all patients with stroke admitted to the stroke unit at a hospital in southern Sweden from October 1, 2003 to November 30, 2005 each with one close relative. The total sample consisted of 188 patients (mean age=74.0 years) and 152 relatives (mean age=60.1 years). Data were collected during interviews, 2-3 weeks after discharge.

    The results showed that less depressive symptoms, more outdoor activities and performance of interests are important variables that related to higher HRQoL. SF-36 functions well as a measure of health related quality of life in Swedish stroke patients, but the two summary scales have shortcomings. Compared to a Swedish normal population, scores on all scales/components of the SF-36 were lower among stroke patients especially in the middle-aged group. Most of the patients perceived that they received information, but fewer perceived participation in the planning of medical treatment and needs of care/service/rehabilitation and goal setting. The relatives perceived that they need more information and they perceived low participation in goal setting and needs assessment. The professionals seem to lack effective practices for involving patients and their relatives to perceive participation in discharge planning. It is essential to develop and to implement methods for discharge planning, including sharing information, needs assessment with goal setting that facilitate patients’ and relatives’ perceived participation. The results suggest that ICF can be used in goal setting and needs assessment in discharge planning after acute stroke.

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    FULLTEXT01
  • 17.
    Almborg, Ann-Helene
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health.
    Ulander, Kerstin
    Thulin, Anders
    Berg, Stig
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology.
    Discharged after stroke - important factors for health-related quality of life.2010In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 19, no 15-16, p. 2196-2206Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIMS: This study examines different correlates to health-related quality (HRQoL) of life after discharge in patients with stroke.

    BACKGROUND: HRQoL is an important aspect of life after suffering a stroke. Previous research has revealed several variables associated with poststroke quality of life, including age, gender, depression, fatigue, length of hospital stay, functional status and amount of social participation. However, the time span after stroke varies greatly in the different studies. Although the multiple factors that contribute to short-term postdischarge HRQoL have potential importance for discharge planning, to our knowledge, these factors have not been systematically investigated during the earlier days following discharge.

    DESIGN: Cross-sectional study.

    METHODS: The sample consisted of 188 consecutively included individuals (mean age 74 years, 56% men) from a stroke unit in southern Sweden. The interviews were performed two to three weeks after discharge and included use of the SF-36, the Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale, the Barthel Index, the Frenchay Activities Index, performance of interests and survey of patients' perceived participation in discharge planning. Multiple linear regression analysis was conducted to identify variables associated with HRQoL.

    RESULTS: Multiple regression analyses with the eight scales of SF-36 as dependent variables revealed eight models, one for each scale, which were statistically significant. Depressive symptoms were associated with lower HRQoL. Ability to perform personal and social activities, interests, younger age, education (elementary school) and shorter hospital stay were related to higher HRQoL. Patients' perceived participation in discharge planning was both positively and negatively associated with HRQoL.

    CONCLUSIONS: Several variables were related to good HRQoL two to three weeks post-discharge, particularly fewer depressive symptoms, participation in social activities such as outdoor activities and performance of interests.

    RELEVANCE TO CLINICAL PRACTICE: These results can be used to design needs assessment forms of discharge planning to promote adaptation and recovery after stroke.

  • 18.
    Alsterlund, Sara
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Quality Improvement and Leadership in Health and Welfare.
    Bad reviews - Good news: Ett förbättringsarbete av en digital vårdtjänst2020Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    KRY helps people who need healthcare through digital meetings. After the appointment patients can give instant feedback about their experience. There was no system to do follow-ups when patients have left a bad review after a meeting.

    The overall aim of the improvement work was to develop a better service and to offer better meetings in the future.

    The purpose of the study was to investigate employees' experiences of a system for monitoring dissatisfied patients who have used digital care.

     

    The improvement work was carried out according to Nolan's improvement model. The study was a qualitative interview study with an inductive approach. 

    Reasons for complaints in digital care have not differed significantly in comparison with physical care. Employees feel that the work of calling bad reviews gave satisfied patients and a feeling of doing a good job. There was an experience of gains both for the patients as well as for the company. 

    This study has shown that follow-up of patients who left a bad review is perceived as something positive for both patients and those who will perform the follow-ups. Reports of suggestions from patients for improvement of the service/product has been done and got results.

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  • 19.
    Ameryoun, Ahmad
    et al.
    Health Management Research Center, Baqiyatallah University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran.
    Pakpour, Amir H.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Qazvin University of Medical Sciences, Qazvin, Iran.
    Nikoobakht, Mehdi
    Department of Neurosurgery, Iran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran.
    Saffari, Mohsen
    Health Research Center, Life Style Institute, Baqiyatallah University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran.
    Yaseri, Mahdi
    Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran.
    O'Garo, Keisha-Gaye N.
    Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina.
    Koenig, Harold G.
    Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina.
    Effectiveness of an In-Service Education Program to Improve Patient Safety Directed at Surgical Residents: A Randomized Controlled Trial2019In: Journal of Surgical Education, ISSN 1931-7204, E-ISSN 1878-7452, Vol. 76, no 5, p. 1309-1318Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Patient safety is a critical issue in healthcare services particularly in surgical units and operation rooms because of the high prevalence and risk of medical errors in such settings. This study was conducted to determine whether a 1-day educational intervention can change the attitude and behavior of surgical residents regarding patient safety.

    Methods: A total of 90 surgical residents were recruited from 6 university hospitals located in Tehran and Qazvin, Iran, and were randomized to either the intervention or a control group. Those in the intervention group participated in a 1-day workshop on patient safety, whereas the control group received no intervention. Both groups were followed for 3 months after the intervention was completed. The Safety Attitude Questionnaire and Oxford Non-Technical Skills scale were administered at 3 points in time (baseline, 1 month after the intervention, and 3 month later). The data were analyzed using repeated measures analysis of variance.

    Results: Total score on the Safety Attitude Questionnaire improved from 54.5 (SD = 14.4) at baseline to 58.3 (SD = 13.8) 3 months after the intervention in the intervention group; all dimensions, with the exception of working condition, showed significant changes. In addition, the Oxford Non-Technical Skills scale – as assessed by attending surgeons – improved significantly in all domains (p < 0.05). More than 60% of participants in the intervention group scored in the positive range for items assessing safety and teamwork climate.

    Conclusions: A 1-day interactive educational workshop may be effective in changing the attitude and practice of surgical residents regarding patient safety. Further assessment of this intervention in other healthcare settings involving health professionals from various specialties and use of an objective measure such as number of reported medical errors are needed to corroborate these findings. 

  • 20. Andel, Ross
    et al.
    Kåreholt, Ingemar
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology.
    The role of midlife ocupational complexity and leisure time activity in cognitive performance later in life.2013Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 21.
    Andel, Ross
    et al.
    School of Aging Studies, University of South Florida, Tampa, Florida.
    Silverstein, Merril
    Sociology Department and School of Social Work, Aging Studies Institute, Syracuse University, New York.
    Kåreholt, Ingemar
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology.
    The role of midlife occupational complexity and leisure activity in late-life cognition2015In: The journals of gerontology. Series B, Psychological sciences and social sciences, ISSN 1079-5014, E-ISSN 1758-5368, Vol. 70, no 2, p. 314-321Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE:

    To examine whether occupational complexity of working with data or people, and cognitive or social leisure activity at midlife predicted cognition in advanced old age.

    METHODS:

    We used 810 eligible participants from Longitudinal Study of Living Conditions of the Oldest Old, a Swedish nationally representative study of individuals aged 77+ with cognitive assessments (an abridged version of the Mini-Mental State Exam) administered in 1992 and 2002 and linked to information about their midlife occupation and leisure activities collected in 1968 and 1981. A bootstrapping technique was applied to examine the direct and interactive associations of occupational complexity and leisure activity with late-life cognition.

    RESULTS:

    Controlling for demographic and health-related factors from childhood, midlife, and late life, we found that greater work complexity, both with people and with data, and greater participation in cognitive or social leisure activities independently related to better late-life cognitive scores. The complexity-cognition link was moderated by leisure activity such that the cognitive benefit related to the complexity of work-especially complexity of working with people-was rendered insignificant when participation in leisure activities-especially social activities-was above average.

    DISCUSSION:

    Results are discussed in terms of using work complexity to compensate for lack of leisure activity as well as in terms of promoting leisure engagement to compensate for long-term cognitive disadvantage imposed by working in less challenging occupations.

  • 22.
    Andersson, Ann-Christine
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, The Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare.
    Förbättringskunskap och förbättringsforskning: Kunskapsöversikt om förbättringsarbetes framväxt inom hälso- och välfärdssektorn i Sverige, samt implikationer för projektet Barnens Bästa Gäller! i Kronoberg2022Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Syftet med denna kunskapsöversikt är att belysa hur förbättringskunskapen utvecklats i den svenska hälsovård- och välfärdssektorn, och vilka implikationer förbättringskunskap kan ha för projektet ”Barnens Bästa Gäller! i Kronoberg” (BBGiK). Rapporten avslutas med en diskussion om de möjligheter och utmaningar som påverkar projektet. Förbättringskunskap är nära besläktat med kvalitetsutveckling, och är numer vanligt förekommande i hälso- vård- och välfärdsorganisationer. De lagar och regelverk som styr innefattar skyldigheter att bedriva kvalitetsutveckling, och Ledningssystem för systematiskt kvalitetsarbete (SOSFS 2011:9) gäller för både vård- och omsorgsorganisationer.

    Rapporten lyfter fram förbättringskunskapens ursprung, dess forskningsanknytning och evidens och utveckling och övergång till vård- och välfärdsorganisationer. När förbättringskunskap fått fäste i den kunskapsintensiva evidensbaserade vårdsektorn och förbättringsarbeten började bli mera vanligt, uppstod frågor om hur förbättringsmetoder fungerar. Flera av de tidiga aktörerna inom förbättringskunskap var läkare och sjuksköterskor, och därför blev det angeläget att även arbetet med förbättringar kunde betraktas utifrån evidenskrav. Runt sekelskiftet 2000 började de första forskningspublikationerna dyka upp. En av förbättringsforskningens stora utmaningar är att utveckla vetenskaplig robust kunskap, och en vanlig kritik har varit att en svag vetenskaplig och teoretisk grund.

    I rapporten har befintlig litteratur producerad i Sverige, i form av böcker och bokkapitel, avhandlingar och artiklar, sammanställts och analyserats avseende publikationsfrekvens över tid och innehåll (tema). Sammanställningen lyfter fram studier som har extra relevans för projektet, såsom samverkansprojekt och olika ansatser att överföra och anpassa förbättringskunskap till den sociala sektorn. Mellan åren 2007–2020 utkom 30 böcker, bokkapitel och enklare skrifter. De flesta är läroböcker i form av antologier skrivna för vårdens professioner och handlar ofta om grundläggande förbättringskunskap. 32 avhandlingar från nio svenska lärosäten identifierades, den första från 2003. Flera avhandlingar intar organisationsperspektiv, men även ledarskap, patientsäkerhet och patientinvolvering/delaktighet förekommer. Totalt 210 artiklar identifierades publicerade mellan 1992 och 2020, med flest antal (n=166) efter 2011. Tematiseringen resulterade i sex olika teman: 1) Systematiskt och värdeskapande förbättringsarbete; 2) Samverkan mellan organisationer och vårdgivare; 3) Användning av förbättringsmetoder och (teoretiska) modeller; 4) Ledarskap och lärande; 5) Mätningar, kvalitetsregister och uppföljning; samt 6) Personinvolvering och patientsäkerhet.

    Delaktighet och samskapade är en tydligt ökande trend inom vården. Samtidigt har det inom sociala verksamheter länge ansetts viktigt att beakta personers rättigheter och möjligheter till inflytande. Sammanställningen pekar mot en utveckling där samverkan mellan organisationer och samskapande med dem vård och omsorg är till för blir en allt viktigare faktor. Detta är en viktig aspekt för projektet BBGiK, som spänner över flera olika verksamheter och organisationer. Det är alltid en utmaning när olika verksamheter tillsammans ska hitta fungerande lösningar. Denna utmaning blir inte mindre av att de kommer ifrån olika kunskapstraditioner, men i projektet finns förutsättningar för gemensamt lärande runt en gemensam modell. En förutsättning för att lyckas med förbättringsarbete är ett aktivt ledarskap, och strävan mot samma gemensamma mål: ”att skapa en trygg och säker uppväxt för VARJE barn genom främjande, tidiga och samordnade insatser”.

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  • 23.
    Andersson, Ingvor
    Jönköping University, The Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare.
    Diabeteskonsulent - en möjlig funktion för att förbättra stödet till barn med typ 1 diabetes i skolan2012Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    AbstractBackground: Type 1 diabetes is one of the most common chronic diseases in children. The overall goal in treating diabetes is to normalize the blood sugar level, in order to avoid complications in adulthood. Since a child spends a large part of the day at school, the treatment has to work well during the school hours. In 2008, paediatric diabetes team in Sweden reported that about 50% of the children in lower primary school, suffering from diabetes, do not receive sufficient support in their diabetic treatment at school. A function such as diabetes resource nurse has been tested in Jönköping County Council for two years to offer the school staff necessary knowledge about diabetes. Purpose: Describe the diabetes resource nurse possibility to influence the support children with diabetes receive at school. Method: The collection of empirical data was done through interviews, questionnaires and comparison of HbA1c. Results: The diabetes resource nurse feels that she is able to convey the knowledge necessary for the school personnel. Parents whose children have been visited by a diabetes recourse nurse says that they less often fear that their child does not get good support at school, that more of the children have a person in charge in school and that more children have an individual communication plan, compared to parents whose children have not been visited by a diabetes resource nurse. The function of the diabetes resource nurse did not improve the metabolic control during the study period. Discussion: The result of the intervention shows that a diabetes resource nurse can successfully improve the support children with type 1 diabetes receive at school. Further studies are needed to clarify which grades benefits the most from the support of a diabetes resource nurse and inquire the school personnel's experience of the diabetes consultant's work.

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  • 24.
    Andersson, Lars
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet.
    Sundström, Gerdt
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. SALVE (Social challenges, Actors, Living conditions, reseach VEnue). Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ARN-J (Aging Research Network - Jönköping).
    En återkommande diskussion2019In: Äldre i centrum, ISSN 1653-3585, no 4, p. 54-58Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [sv]

    Ingress: En del saker återkommer i det allmänna medvetandet och forskas om, gång på gång. Dit hör bilden av de äldres isolering. Två emeritusprofessorer förhåller sig dock skeptiska till den hajpade Svenska Ensamheten.

  • 25.
    Anozie, Mary-Jane
    et al.
    Jönköping University.
    Kvarnfors, Elvira Kvarnfors
    Att leva med stomi: En kvalitativ litteraturöversikt2023Independent thesis Basic level (university diploma), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
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  • 26.
    Antevik, Johanna
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology.
    "För att patienten kan få leva lite mer som den vill": - En kvalitativ intervjustudie om fysioterapeuters erfarenheter av patienters delaktighet i sin rehabilitering i ordinärt boende2022Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The number of older people in Sweden and globally who need health care at home is increasing. In Sweden, care is being transformed into Good and close care (Directly translated from God och nära vård), of which the patient's participation is central. Physiotherapists who work with older patients in ordinary housing need to work person-centred and support the patient with their self-care to enable participation.

    Aim: The aim of the study was to describe physiotherapists 'experience of older patients' participation in their rehabilitation in their home.  

    Method: Qualitative method with an inductive approach. Eight interviews were conducted with physiotherapists in municipal health care. The study was analyzed with qualitative content analysis.

    Results: The results revealed three overarching categories: 1) Factors that enable participation, 2) Barriers to participation and 3) A more independent life.

    Conclusion: Increased patient participation can lead to better treatment results, improved health, patients that are more independent and autonomy. Physiotherapists working in a structured person-centred and activity-oriented way, by listening to and guiding the patient and providing sufficient support for self-care, can promote patients' independence. Physiotherapists’ professional experience and clear activity goals contribute to person-centred treatment. Relatives’ attitudes, the patient’s ability and willingness to participate, lack of time, resources and the staff’s work environment in the patient’s home proved to be barriers to participation. 

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  • 27.
    Armus, Marija
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Department for Quality Improvement and Leadership.
    Förbättrad hantering av biobankssamtycke.: En kvalitativ studie om tidseffektiviserad handläggning av nej-talonger i en biobankverksamhet i Region Stockholm.2023Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 80 credits / 120 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    According to the current Biobanking Act in Sweden, processing of patients' biobanking consent must occur immediately without unnecessary time delay. From a patient safety perspective, it’s important to have updated consents in laboratory information systems because correctly updated consents are critical to the delivery of safe care. Previously, biobank organization where study was conducted needed an average of 77 working days to process an incoming biobanking consent, which was overly long.

    The aim of improvement work is to make the process for biobanking consent more time-efficient in one biobank organization in the Region of Stockholm. Nolan’s improvement model, Service Blueprint, 5 P's analysis and the PDSA-cycles were used as methods for this improvement work. With the help of five improvement interventions the number of processing days for biobanking consents was reduced from 77 to 42 working days which is a reduction of 35 days. This improvement work resulted in a more time-efficient process and a new recommendation regarding the number of processing days for biobanking consent. 

    The study of the improvement work aimed to increase the understanding of the staff's experiences regarding improvement work with the process for biobanking consent. The study was conducted as qualitative case study with an inductive approach. Qualitative data collection was carried out in the form of eight interviews. The study showed that the following factors led to increased team effectiveness and time efficiency of the process: systematization of the biobank consent process and motivational factors. Changed work methods, increased personnel resources, and developed communication channels contributed to the creation of the systematic process, which facilitated the implementation of the improvement work and made the process time efficient. Motivational factors that influenced team effectiveness under improvement work were group support, agile working methods and visual evaluation of improvement work.

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  • 28.
    Arvidsson, Patrik
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Centre for Research & Development, Uppsala University/Region Gävleborg, Sweden.
    Granlund, Mats
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    The Relationship Between Intelligence Quotient and Aspects of Everyday Functioning and Participation for People Who Have Mild and Borderline Intellectual Disabilities2018In: JARID: Journal of applied research in intellectual disabilities, ISSN 1360-2322, E-ISSN 1468-3148, Vol. 31, no 1, p. e68-e78Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    This study explored the relationship between intelligence quotient (IQ) and aspects of everyday functioning/participation in individuals (age 16–40) who have a mild/borderline intellectual disability (IQ 55–85).

    Method

    Correlations were examined between IQ and (i) self-rated (n = 72) ability, participation as performance (how often an activity is performed), important participation restriction (not/seldom performing an activity perceived as important) and general well-being and (ii) proxy-rated (n = 41) ability and participation as performance.

    Results

    No significant correlations between IQ and any of the explored measures were found. However, the effect sizes of the correlations between IQ and ability were considered as small but not negligible.

    Conclusions

    The results support the notion that IQ is a poor predictor of general aspects of everyday functioning in persons with mild/borderline intellectual disability. The result indicates that self-ratings partly generate other information than proxy ratings which may be important for assessments of supportive requirements and diagnosis.

  • 29.
    Ayalon, Liat
    et al.
    Louis and Gabi Weisfeld School of Social Work, Bar Ilan University, Ramat Gan, Israel.
    Dolberg, Pnina
    Ruppin Academic Center, Emek Hefer, Israel.
    Mikulionienė, Sarmitė
    Institute of Sociology, Lithuanian Social Research Centre, Vilnius, Lithuania.
    Perek-Białas, Jolanta
    Institute of Sociology and Center of Evaluation and Public Policy Analysis, Jagiellonian University in Cracow, Cracow, Poland.
    Rapolienė, Gražina
    Institute of Sociology, Lithuanian Social Research Centre, Vilnius, Lithuania.
    Stypinska, Justyna
    Free University Berlin, Institute for East European Studies, Department of Sociology, Berlin, Germany.
    Wilińska, Monika
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ARN-J (Aging Research Network - Jönköping).
    de la Fuente-Núñez, Vânia
    Department on Ageing and Life Course, World Health Organization, Geneva, Switzerland.
    A systematic review of existing ageism scales2019In: Ageing Research Reviews, ISSN 1568-1637, E-ISSN 1872-9649, Vol. 54, article id 100919Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Ageism has been shown to have a negative impact on older people's health and wellbeing. Though multiple scales are currently being used to measure this increasingly important issue, syntheses of the psychometric properties of these scales are unavailable. This means that existing estimates of ageism prevalence may not be accurate. We conducted a systematic review aimed at identifying available ageism scales and evaluating their scope and psychometric properties. A comprehensive search strategy was used across fourteen different databases, including PubMed and CINAHL. Independent reviewers extracted data and appraised risk of bias following the COnsensus-based Standards for the selection of health Measurement INstruments (COSMIN) guidelines. Of the 29,664 records identified, 106 studies, assessing 11 explicit scales of ageism, were eligible for inclusion. Only one scale, the 'Expectations Regarding Aging' met minimum requirements for psychometric validation (i.e., adequate content validity, structural validity and internal consistency). Still, this scale only assesses the 'stereotype' dimension of ageism, thus failing to evaluate the other two ageism dimensions (prejudice and discrimination). This paper highlights the need to develop and validate a scale that accounts for the multidimensional nature of ageism. Having a scale that can accurately measure ageism prevalence is key in a time of increasing and rapid population ageing, where the magnitude of this phenomenon may be increasing.

  • 30.
    Bai, Ge
    et al.
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Med Epidemiol & Biostat, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Szwajda, Agnieszka
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Med Epidemiol & Biostat, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Wang, Yunzhang
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Med Epidemiol & Biostat, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Li, Xia
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Med Epidemiol & Biostat, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Bower, Hannah
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Med Solna, Clin Epidemiol Div, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Karlsson, Ida K.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ARN-J (Aging Research Network - Jönköping). Karolinska Inst, Dept Med Epidemiol & Biostat, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Johansson, Boo
    Univ Gothenburg, Ctr Ageing & Hlth AgeCap, Dept Psychol, Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Aslan, Anna K. Dahl
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Med Epidemiol & Biostat, Stockholm, Sweden.;Univ Skovde, Sch Hlth Sci, Skovde, Sweden..
    Pedersen, Nancy L.
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Med Epidemiol & Biostat, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Hagg, Sara
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Med Epidemiol & Biostat, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Jylhava, Juulia
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Med Epidemiol & Biostat, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Frailty trajectories in three longitudinal studies of aging: Is the level or the rate of change more predictive of mortality?2021In: Age and Ageing, ISSN 0002-0729, E-ISSN 1468-2834, Vol. 50, no 6, p. 2174-2182Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: frailty shows an upward trajectory with age, and higher levels increase the risk of mortality. However, it is less known whether the shape of frailty trajectories differs by age at death or whether the rate of change in frailty is associated with mortality. Objectives: to assess population frailty trajectories by age at death and to analyse whether the current level of the frailty index (FI) i.e. the most recent measurement or the person-specific rate of change is more predictive of mortality. Methods: 3,689 individuals from three population-based cohorts with up to 15 repeated measurements of the Rockwood frailty index were analysed. The FI trajectories were assessed by stratifying the sample into four age-at-death groups: <70, 70-80, 80-90 and >90 years. Generalised survival models were used in the survival analysis. Results: the FI trajectories by age at death showed that those who died at <70 years had a steadily increasing trajectory throughout the 40 years before death, whereas those who died at the oldest ages only accrued deficits from age similar to 75 onwards. Higher level of FI was independently associated with increased risk of mortality (hazard ratio 1.68, 95% confidence interval 1.47-1.91), whereas the rate of change was no longer significant after accounting for the current FI level. The effect of the FI level did not weaken with time elapsed since the last measurement. Conclusions: Frailty trajectories differ as a function of age-at-death category. The current level of FI is a stronger marker for risk stratification than the rate of change.

  • 31.
    Bai, Ge
    et al.
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Med Epidemiol & Biostat, Nobels Vag 12A, S-17165 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Wang, Yunzhang
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Med Epidemiol & Biostat, Nobels Vag 12A, S-17165 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Kuja-Halkola, Ralf
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Med Epidemiol & Biostat, Nobels Vag 12A, S-17165 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Li, Xia
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Med Epidemiol & Biostat, Nobels Vag 12A, S-17165 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Tomata, Yasutake
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Med Epidemiol & Biostat, Nobels Vag 12A, S-17165 Stockholm, Sweden.;Kanagawa Univ Human Serv, Fac Hlth & Social Serv, Sch Nutr & Dietet, Yokosuka, Kanagawa, Japan..
    Karlsson, Ida K.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ARN-J (Aging Research Network - Jönköping). Karolinska Inst, Dept Med Epidemiol & Biostat, Nobels Vag 12A, S-17165 Stockholm, Sweden.;Jonkoping Univ, Sch Hlth & Welf, Inst Gerontol & Aging Res Network Jonkoping ARN J, Jonkoping, Sweden..
    Pedersen, Nancy L.
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Med Epidemiol & Biostat, Nobels Vag 12A, S-17165 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Hagg, Sara
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Med Epidemiol & Biostat, Nobels Vag 12A, S-17165 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Jylhava, Juulia
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Med Epidemiol & Biostat, Nobels Vag 12A, S-17165 Stockholm, Sweden.;Univ Tampere, Fac Social Sci Hlth Sci, Tampere, Finland.;Univ Tampere, Gerontol Res Ctr GEREC, Tampere, Finland..
    Frailty and the risk of dementia: is the association explained by shared environmental and genetic factors?2021In: BMC Medicine, E-ISSN 1741-7015, Vol. 19, no 1, article id 248Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Frailty has been identified as a risk factor for cognitive impairment and dementia. However, it is not known whether familial factors, such as genetics and shared environmental factors, underlie this association. We analyzed the association between frailty and the risk of dementia in a large twin cohort and examined the role of familial factors in the association. Methods The Rockwood frailty index (FI) based on 44 health deficits was used to assess frailty. The population-level association between FI and the risk of all-cause dementia was analyzed in 41,550 participants of the Screening Across the Lifespan Twin (SALT) study (full sample, aged 41-97 years at baseline), using Cox and competing risk models. A subsample of 10,487 SALT participants aged 65 and older who received a cognitive assessment (cognitive sample) was used in a sensitivity analysis to assess the effect of baseline cognitive level on the FI-dementia association. To analyze the influence of familial effects on the FI-dementia association, a within-pair analysis was performed. The within-pair model was also used to assess whether the risk conferred by frailty varies by age at FI assessment. Results A total of 3183 individuals were diagnosed with dementia during the 19-year follow-up. A 10% increase in FI was associated with an increased risk of dementia (hazard ratio [HR] 1.17 (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.07, 1.18)) in the full sample adjusted for age, sex, education, and tobacco use. A significant association was likewise found in the cognitive sample, with an HR of 1.13 (95% CI 1.09, 1.20), adjusted for age, sex, and cognitive level at baseline. The associations were not attenuated when adjusted for APOE e4 carrier status or considering the competing risk of death. After adjusting for familial effects, we found no evidence for statistically significant attenuation of the effect. The risk conferred by higher FI on dementia was constant after age 50 until very old age. Conclusions A higher level of frailty predicts the risk of dementia and the association appears independent of familial factors. Targeting frailty might thus contribute to preventing or delaying dementia.

  • 32.
    Bailey-Brændgaard, Miles
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Prosthetics and Orthotics.
    Enevoldsen, Peter Wibe
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Prosthetics and Orthotics.
    Accuracy and Reliability of 3D Scanning Spatial Data when Capturing Limb Morphology for Use within Prosthetics and Orthotics: A Scoping Review2022Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Scanners are becoming widespread in Prosthetics and Orthotics, replacing plaster casting in the manufacture of some types of devices. P&O shape capture must be accurate and reliable, so the device is comfortable and reproducible between clinicians/sessions.

    Objectives: To map knowledge on measuring accuracy and reliability of spatial data produced from 3D scanners.

    Methods: The study design was a scoping review using the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic reviews and Meta-Analyses extension for Scoping Reviews (PRISMA-ScR). Studies published in or after 2010 in English with a full-text available that analyse either the accuracy/validity or reliability of human 3D scanning data within a P&O context. Sources were obtained from Pubmed, CINAHL, Scopus, Cochrane Library, Web of Science, and AMed databases on 25th March.

    Results: The search identified 115 studies of which 9 were included (7 experimental [4 prosthetic, 3 orthotic], 1 systematic review, 1 literature review). 7 analysed both reliability and accuracy/validity and 2 analysed reliability. High heterogeneity amongst studies’ methods, techniques, and equipment.

    Conclusion: Methods, techniques, and equipment used to measure accuracy/validity and reliability varied greatly though more so in the measurement of accuracy/validity. Within the studies, researchers called for more research on standardisation of measurement methods and techniques.

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    Miles and Peter Thesis
  • 33.
    Bannon, Brittany L.
    et al.
    Univ Calif Riverside, San Diego, USA.
    Dahl Aslan, Anna K.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ARN-J (Aging Research Network - Jönköping).
    Pedersen, Nancy L.
    Karolinska Inst, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Reynolds, Chandra A.
    Univ Calif Riverside, Riverside, USA.
    Confirmatory factor analysis of illness behavior in the Swedish Adoption/Twin Study of Aging (SATSA)2017In: Annals of Behavioral Medicine, ISSN 0883-6612, E-ISSN 1532-4796, Vol. 51, no Suppl. 1, p. S2654-S2655Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Illness behaviors—or affective, cognitive, and behavioral responses to symptoms of illness—predict patient outcomes, including symptom exacerbation and functional recovery, and they account for a large proportion of U.S. healthcare costs. Although priorcross-sectional work has examined illness behaviors like symptom reporting in isolation, the measurement of illness behavior using a longitudinal, multi-indicator approach has yet to be explored.

    Aim: We evaluated illness behavior as a latent, developmental construct in the Swedish Adoption/Twin Study of Aging (SATSA).

    Method: Participants were up to 1,886 individuals (from 1,223 twin pairs) ages 29 to 102 years (Mage baseline = 62.32 years; SD =13.69; 59% Female). Illness behavior indicators included somatic complaints, non-prescription medication use, pain-related disability and perceived illness complications. The psychomotor retardation subscale of the CES-D was used to index somatic complaints, and medication use was a simple composite of 9 dichotomous items on participants’ use of non-prescription medications, such as over-the-counter analgesics, in the previous month. Pain-related disability included a simple composite of three dichotomous items on the presence of neck,back, or shoulder pain that prevented participants from performing daily tasks or activities. Perceived illness disability was a composite of difference scores, calculated from subtracting a physician panel’s objective ratings of disability for each of 35 medical conditions (on a 3-pointscale; 1= Little or no disability; 3= Severe disability) from participants’ self-ratings of how much each of the same endorsed medical conditions interfered with their daily lives (on the same 3-point scale; 1= Not at all; 3= A lot). Positive composite scores reflected higher perceived disability relative to what was expected from the objective ratings, whereas a composite score of zero reflected “accuracy” or agreement in perceived illness complications. Confirmatory Factor Analysis (CFA) was used to evaluate invariance in the loadings of these four indicatorson a latent illness behavior factor across four questionnaire waves (1987-2004).

    Findings: Confirmatory factor analyses revealed moderate factor loadings of the four indicators (standardized loadings ranged from .49 to .52, all ps < .0001). Also, practical fit indices from the nested model comparisons suggested strong factorial invariance in the loadings across time (CFI = .96; TLI = .95, RMSEA= .03, 90% CI: [.026, .035]).

    Conclusion: Illness behavior as a latent, multi-indicator construct represents a promising focus for longitudinal work on behavior change and maintenance.

  • 34.
    Bannon, Brittany L.
    et al.
    Univ Utah, Salt Lake City, USA.
    Dahl Aslan, Anna K.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ARN-J (Aging Research Network - Jönköping).
    Pedersen, Nancy L.
    Karolinska Inst, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Reynolds, Chandra A.
    Univ Calif Riverside, USA.
    Illness behaviors mediate the link between social support and functional decline in the Swedish Adoption Twin Study of Aging2018In: Annals of Behavioral Medicine, ISSN 0883-6612, E-ISSN 1532-4796, Vol. 52, no Suppl. 1, p. S314-S314Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 35. Bard Wolbe, Carolina
    et al.
    Gustafsson, Frida
    Futurums kursvärdering: En kvalitativ studie av VFU-ansvarigas uppfattning om och användningsområde av Futurums kursvärdering inom Region Jönköpings län2023Student thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The Futurum Academy for Health and Care is Region Jönköping County's (RJL) activity for research and education. We were there for five weeks to observe the operations and collect data that is the basis for our thesis. 

    Purpose: This assignment aims to investigate VFU managers' perceptions and use of the current course evaluation that the students fill in after completing the placement within RJL. 

    Method: We have chosen to use a qualitative method in the form of semi-structured interviews. The target group in the study are VFU-managers. 

    Conclusion:  Overall, the result shows that Futurum's course valuation requires revision. The data we have collected shows the perceptions that the interviewed VFU managers have regarding the course evaluation. The result shows that the answers to the course evaluation can form the basis of the organization's quality work. Regarding the extent of how the organizations use the compiled results from the course valuation that they receive from Futurum, they differ.

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  • 36.
    Barkensjö, Lena
    et al.
    Jönköping University.
    Josefsson, Erik
    Jönköping University.
    Användarundersökning om nöjdhet med Sveriges största kommunala kvalitetsregister Senior alert2022Student thesis
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  • 37.
    Baumann, I.
    et al.
    Center for Health Sciences, Zurich University of Applied Sciences, Winterthur, Switzerland.
    Eyjólfsdóttir, H. S.
    Aging Research Center, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Fritzell, J.
    Aging Research Center, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Lennartsson, C.
    Aging Research Center, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Darin-Mattsson, A.
    Aging Research Center, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Kåreholt, Ingemar
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ARN-J (Aging Research Network - Jönköping).
    Andel, R.
    School of Aging Studies, University of South Florida, Tampa, FL, United States.
    Dratva, J.
    Center for Health Sciences, Zurich University of Applied Sciences, Winterthur, Switzerland.
    Agahi, N.
    Aging Research Center, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Do cognitively stimulating activities affect the association between retirement timing and cognitive functioning in old age?2022In: Ageing & Society, ISSN 0144-686X, E-ISSN 1469-1779, Vol. 42, no 2, p. 306-330Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In response to the rising financial pressure on old-age pension systems in industrialised economies, many European countries plan to increase the eligibility age for retirement pensions. We used data from Sweden to examine whether (and if so, how) retirement after age 65 - the eligibility age for basic pension - compared to retiring earlier affects older adults' (between ages 70 and 85) cognitive functioning. Using a propensity score matching (PSM) approach, we addressed the selection bias potentially introduced by non-random selection into either early or late retirement. We also examined average and heterogeneous treatment effects (HTEs). HTEs were evaluated for different levels of cognitive stimulation from occupational activities before retirement and from leisure activities after retirement. We drew from a rich longitudinal data-set linking two nationally representative Swedish surveys with a register data-set and found that, on average, individuals who retire after age 65 do not have a higher level of cognitive functioning than those who retire earlier. Similarly, we did not observe HTEs from occupational activities. With respect to leisure activities, we found no systematic effects on cognitive functioning among those working beyond age 65. We conclude that, in general, retirement age does not seem to affect cognitive functioning in old age. Yet, the rising retirement age may put substantial pressure on individuals who suffer from poor health at the end of their occupational career, potentially exacerbating social- and health-related inequalities among older people.

  • 38. Baumann, I.
    et al.
    Sif Eyjólfsdóttir, H.
    Fritzell, J.
    Lennartsson, C.
    Darin-Mattsson, A.
    Kåreholt, Ingemar
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ARN-J (Aging Research Network - Jönköping).
    Andel, R.
    Dratva, J.
    Agahi, N.
    Retirement age and cognitive functioning in old age: the role of stimulating occupational activities. The role of occupational activity in explaining the association between retirement timing and cognitive functioning in old age2018Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 39. Baumann, I.
    et al.
    Sif Eyjólfsdóttir, H.
    Fritzell, J.
    Lennartsson, C.
    Darin-Mattsson, A.
    Nilsen, Charlotta
    Kåreholt, Ingemar
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ARN-J (Aging Research Network - Jönköping).
    Andel, R.
    Dratva, J.
    Agahi, N.
    Retirement age and cognitive functioning in old age: the role of stimulating occupational activities2018Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 40.
    Beam, Christopher R.
    et al.
    Univ Southern Calif, Dept Psychol, Los Angeles, CA 90007 USA.;Univ Southern Calif, Sch Gerontol, Los Angeles, CA 90007 USA..
    Finkel, Deborah
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ARN-J (Aging Research Network - Jönköping). Indiana Univ Southeast, Dept Psychol, New Albany, IN 47150 USA.;Jonkoping Univ, Inst Gerontol, Smaland, Sweden..
    Turkheimer, Eric
    Univ Virginia, Dept Psychol, Gilmer Hall, Charlottesville, VA 22903 USA..
    Guterbock, Thomas
    Univ Virginia, Survey Res Ctr, Charlottesville, VA USA..
    Johnson, Sean
    Univ Virginia, Survey Res Ctr, Charlottesville, VA USA..
    Giangrande, Evan J.
    Univ Virginia, Dept Psychol, Gilmer Hall, Charlottesville, VA 22903 USA..
    Pasquenza, Natalie
    Univ Louisville, Dept Pediat, Louisville, KY 40292 USA..
    Ryan, Lesa
    Univ Louisville, Dept Pediat, Louisville, KY 40292 USA..
    Davis, Deborah W.
    Univ Louisville, Dept Pediat, Louisville, KY 40292 USA..
    Preliminary Results of Cognitive Ability Trajectories from Infancy Through Middle-Age in the Louisville Twin Study2021In: Behavior Genetics, ISSN 0001-8244, E-ISSN 1573-3297, Vol. 51, no 6, p. 693-694Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 41.
    Beam, Christopher R.
    et al.
    Department of Psychology, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA, United States.
    Turkheimer, Eric
    Department of Psychology, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA, United States.
    Finkel, Deborah
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ARN-J (Aging Research Network - Jönköping). Department of Psychology, Indiana University Southeast, New Albany, IN, United States.
    Levine, Morgan E.
    Department of Pathology, School of Medicine, Yale University, New Haven, CT, United States.
    Zandi, Ebrahim
    Norris Comprehensive Cancer Center & Department of Molecular Microbiology and Immunology, Keck School of Medicine, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA, United States.
    Guterbock, Thomas M.
    Center for Survey Research and Department of Sociology, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA, United States.
    Giangrande, Evan J.
    Department of Psychology, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA, United States.
    Ryan, Lesa
    Department of Pediatrics, University of Louisville, Louisville, KY, United States.
    Pasquenza, Natalie
    Department of Pediatrics, University of Louisville, Louisville, KY, United States.
    Davis, Deborah W.
    Department of Pediatrics, University of Louisville, Louisville, KY, United States.
    Midlife study of the Louisville Twins: Connecting cognitive development to biological and cognitive aging2020In: Behavior Genetics, ISSN 0001-8244, E-ISSN 1573-3297, Vol. 50, no 2, p. 73-83Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Louisville Twin Study (LTS) began in 1958 and became a premier longitudinal twin study of cognitive development. The LTS continuously collected data from twins through 2000 after which the study closed indefinitely due to lack of funding. Now that the majority of the sample is age 40 or older (61.36%, N = 1770), the LTS childhood data can be linked to midlife cognitive functioning, among other physical, biological, social, and psychiatric outcomes. We report results from two pilot studies in anticipation of beginning the midlife phase of the LTS. The first pilot study was a participant tracking study, in which we showed that approximately 90% of the Louisville families randomly sampled (N = 203) for the study could be found. The second pilot study consisted of 40 in-person interviews in which twins completed cognitive, memory, biometric, and functional ability measures. The main purpose of the second study was to correlate midlife measures of cognitive functioning to a measure of biological age, which is an alternative index to chronological age that quantifies age as a function of the breakdown of structural and functional physiological systems, and then to relate both of these measures to twins’ cognitive developmental trajectories. Midlife IQ was uncorrelated with biological age (−.01) while better scores on episodic memory more strongly correlated with lower biological age (−.19 to −.31). As expected, midlife IQ positively correlated with IQ measures collected throughout childhood and adolescence. Additionally, positive linear rates of change in FSIQ scores in childhood significantly correlated with biological age (−.68), physical functioning (.71), and functional ability (−.55), suggesting that cognitive development predicts lower biological age, better physical functioning, and better functional ability. In sum, the Louisville twins can be relocated to investigate whether and how early and midlife cognitive and physical health factors contribute to cognitive aging. 

  • 42.
    Bengnér, Malin
    et al.
    Department of Infectious Diseases, Ryhov County Hospital, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Béziat, Vivien
    Department of Medicine, Center for Infectious Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Ernerudh, Jan
    Division of Clinical Immunology, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Nilsson, Bengt-Olof
    Department of Infectious Diseases, Ryhov County Hospital, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Löfgren, Sture
    Department of Laboratory Medicine, Clinical Microbiology, Ryhov County Hospital, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Wikby, Anders
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine.
    Malmberg, Karl Johan
    Department of Medicine, Center for Infectious Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Strindhall, Jan
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Biomedical Platform.
    Independent skewing of the T cell and NK cell compartments associated with cytomegalovirus infection suggests division of labor between innate and adaptive immunity.2014In: Age (Omaha), ISSN 0161-9152, E-ISSN 1574-4647, Vol. 36, no 2, p. 571-582Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection induces profound changes in different subsets of the cellular immune system. We have previously identified an immune risk profile (IRP) where CMV-associated changes in the T cell compartment, defined as a CD4/CD8 ratio < 1, are associated with increased mortality in elderly people. Since natural killer (NK) cells have an important role in the defense against viral infections, we examined whether the expansion of CD8 + T cells seen in individuals with CD4/CD8 ratio < 1 is coupled to a parallel skewing of the NK cell compartment. A number of 151 subjects were examined with CMV serology and a flow cytometry panel for assessment of T cell and NK cell subsets. CMV-seropositive individuals had higher frequencies of CD57 + and NKG2C + NK cells and lower frequencies of NKG2A + NK cells, in line with a more differentiated NK cell compartment. Intriguingly, however, there was no correlation between CD4/CD8 ratio and NK cell repertoires among CMV-seropositive donors, despite the profound skewing of the T cell compartment in the group with CD4/CD8 ratio < 1. Conversely, donors with profound expansion of NK cells, defined as NKG2C + NK cells with high expression of CD57 and ILT-2, did not display more common changes in their T cell repertoire, suggesting that NK cell expansion is independent of the T cell-defined IRP. Altogether, these results indicate that the effect of CMV on CD8 T cells and NK cells is largely nonoverlapping and independent.

  • 43. Bernandersson, Hanna
    et al.
    Hochmuth, Maxie
    Förbättringsförslag för uppdatering av Hjärtats hus hemsida: Ett förbättringsarbete utifrån ett användarperspektiv2023Student thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: Hjärtats hus in Region Jönköping County is an open meeting-place for individuals who are currently living with or have had their lives significantly impacted by an illness or chronic condition. The meeting-place also welcomes close relatives and friends. The main website today works as a temporary solution. The operative team of Hjärtats hus has put out a request for support updating the website as one step in the process of reaching out to new and younger visitors. 

    Purpose: The aim of the improvement project is to create a clear visual representation of a proposal that outlines how Hjärtats hus website can be updated from the perspective of its users.

    Methods: The Nolan model of improvement has been used in the improvement work for Hjärtats hus website. The basis for the improvement work has been gathered from Hjärtats hus operative team, through a web survey and selected web accessibility guidelines.                       

    Result: The results from the operative team, data from the web survey and selected web accessibility guidelines have shown a great potential for improvement for Hjärtats hus website.  

    Conclusion: The result of the improvement work project is a visual presentation of how the website can be updated. The proposals are based on a user perspective and involve changes in the website's content, layout and language.

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  • 44. Bisse, Lusin
    et al.
    Dinamarca, Katherine
    Förbättring av sökordsmall: Arbetsterapeuters och fysioterapeuters upplevelse av sökordsmallar i Region Jönköpings läns Habiliteringscentrum.2023Student thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Background: To write notes takes time, time that could have been set aside for patients. Medical records in health care are an important aspect seeing that it will contribute to safer care. A work improvement to the medical records could be done at Habilitation center for efficiency and time saving. Our survey is a step towards improving this.

    Purpose: The aim of the study is to investigate how the search term templates in Cosmic can be improved for occupational therapist and physiotherapist at the Child and Youth and Adult habilitation center in Jönköping County and suggest a new template.

    Method: We chose action research as a method because our investigation is a part of an improvement project. The term is about the workplace facing a problem and we used PDSA (PGSA) to create a survey. The survey was sent to the occupational therapist and physiotherapist to collect data.

    Conclusion: Our collected data showed that the existing templates worked well at the workplace. But some of the search terms were rarely used or not used at all and could be removed. By researching which search terms were most used and adjusting the template based on that, the search terms template could be improved.

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  • 45.
    Bjurbäck, Helena
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology.
    I gränslandet mellan att bistå och bistånd: En kartläggning av biståndshandläggares hantering av sociala problem2023Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [sv]

    Socialt arbete med äldre har under lång tid behandlats synonymt med äldreomsorg. Detta trots att målgruppen är heterogen med skiftande och individuella behov precis som alla andra människor. Detta gör att äldreomsorgen inte sällan får agera sista instans även för äldre personer med sociala problem som kanske inte alltid har tydliga omsorgsbehov. Detta riskerar leda till att vissa sociala problem som äldre personer har faller mellan stolarna och därför behöver biståndshandläggarens uppgifter och arbete för äldre personer breddas. Äldreförvaltningen i Göteborgs stad har beslutat att bredda yrkesrollen till att bistå äldre personer som har behov utanför äldreomsorgen. I samverkan med forskare vid Institutionen för socialt arbete, Göteborgs universitet och Högskolan Väst delades en webbenkät ut till 205 biståndshandläggare i Göteborgs Stad inom avdelningen för myndighet äldre. Kartläggningen genomförs innan förändringen av yrkesrollen ägt rum med som en sorts temperaturtagning av utgångsläget och förutsättningar inför breddningen av yrkesrollen. Materialet från enkätundersökningen används och utgör material till aktuell magisteruppsats för att studera i vilken utsträckning som sociala problem hanteras inom äldreomsorgen inom den traditionella biståndshandläggarrollen. Syftet är att studera biståndshandläggares arbete med sociala problem inom äldreomsorgen och hur detta påverkas av utbildningsbakgrund och antal år i arbetet som biståndshandläggare. Resultaten visar att biståndshandläggare sällan möter sociala problem och att de hänvisar i låg uträckning till andra myndigheter och verksamheter. Det verkar som att antal år i arbetet har större betydelse än utbildningsbakgrund för hantering av sociala problem. Samtidigt säger studien för lite om biståndshandläggarens förutsättningar i arbetet och fler studier behövs. Biståndshandläggare vill arbeta mer förebyggande. Utifrån studiens resultat kan kunskap om relationen mellan olika sociala problem därför förstås som viktig för att de bättre ska kunna upptäcka och förebygga problemen. Breddningen av biståndshandläggarens uppdrag kan även kräva mer kunskap om hanteringen av sociala problem mellan myndigheter och verksamheter som kommer i kontakt med äldre personer och de sociala problemen.

     

     

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  • 46.
    Bjursell, Cecilia
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Lifelong learning/Encell.
    Growth through education: the narratives of older adults2019In: Frontiers in Sociology, E-ISSN 2297-7775, Vol. 4, article id 11Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The focus of Narrative Gerontology is placed on stories about the aging process. In the present paper, the learning of older adults in a Senior University context is captured by means of stories written by the participants themselves. The examination of older adults' stories, as they look back on life or any narrative that connected to a specific area of life, can contribute to our understanding of growth later in life. The aim of the study is to examine how growth manifests itself later in life. Participants at Senior University were asked to share their experiences of education later in life. Participation was voluntary and the identity of each participant was kept anonymous for the purpose of the research project. Fifty-three stories written by Senior University participants (n = 38 women and 15 men) were analyzed according to: (i) an inductive analysis of the stories that resulted in a description of the main topics addressed in the stories, and (ii) a deductive analysis that invoked a theoretical framework concerning the existential aspects of older adults' learning, including “corporeality,” “relationality,” “spatiality,” “temporality,” and “materiality.” The two analyses were compared, and it was noted that “relationality” and “spatiality” corresponded to the educational experiences in the stories. “Relationality” was observed to be concerned with the social dimensions of life; but in the context of Senior University, “relationality” was strongly intertwined with the learning process. “Spatiality” addressed how older adults relate to physical- and mental space. Participation at Senior University entailed an expansion of both physical- and mental space for the participants. A number of tensions were identified in the stories. One the one hand, the stories can be interpreted as illustrations of moving forward and embracing continued growth and development. On the other hand, the stories can be interpreted as illustrations of resistance toward aging and decline. Since life is complex and contradictory, multiple, and even contradictory plots, co-exist in life stories.

  • 47.
    Bjursell, Cecilia
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Lifelong learning/Encell.
    Nystedt, Paul
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, The Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare.
    Björklund, Anita
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ARN-J (Aging Research Network - Jönköping).
    Sternäng, Ola
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ARN-J (Aging Research Network - Jönköping). Stockholm Centre for Health and Social Change (SCOHOS).
    Education level explains participation in work and education later in life2017In: Educational gerontology, ISSN 0360-1277, E-ISSN 1521-0472, Vol. 43, no 10, p. 511-521Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A prolonged working life is crucial for sustaining social welfare and fiscal stability for countries facing ageing populations. The group of older adults is not homogeneous; however, differences within the group may affect the propensity to continue working and to participate in continuing education. The aim of this paper is to explore how participation in work and education vary with gender, age, and education level in a sample of older adults. The study was performed in Sweden, a context characterized by high female labour-market-participation rates and a high average retirement age. The participants were 232 members of four of the major senior citizens? organizations. We found no differences in participation in work and education based on gender. People older than 75 years were found to be as active as people 65?75 years old in education, but the older group worked less. There were positive associations between education level and participation in both work and education. Hence, this study implies that socio-economic inequalities along these dimensions are widened later in life. This highlights the importance of engaging workers with lower education levels in educational efforts throughout life. It also emphasizes the need for true lifelong learning in society.

  • 48.
    Björklund Carlstedt, Anita
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ARN-J (Aging Research Network - Jönköping).
    Bridge employment - ett fortsatt arbetsliv2018In: Äldre i centrum, ISSN 1653-3585, no 2, p. 44-47Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 49.
    Blaakilde, Anne Leonora
    et al.
    Region Zealand.
    Wilinska, MonikaJönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Behavioural Science and Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. SALVE (Social challenges, Actors, Living conditions, reseach VEnue). Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ARN-J (Aging Research Network - Jönköping).Mosberg Iversen, SaraUniversity of Southern Denmark.
    Special issue: Growing old with and via media. MedieKultur: Journal of media and communication research, 33(63)2017Collection (editor) (Other academic)
  • 50.
    Blane, A.
    et al.
    School of Occupational Therapy and Social Work, Curtin University, Perth, Australia.
    Lee, H. C.
    School of Occupational Therapy and Social Work, Curtin University, Perth, Australia.
    Lee, M.
    School of Occupational Therapy and Social Work, Curtin University, Perth, Australia.
    Parsons, R.
    School of Occupational Therapy and Social Work, Curtin University, Perth, Australia.
    Falkmer, Torbjörn
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation. School of Occupational Therapy and Social Work, Curtin University, Perth, Australia.
    The cognitive and socio-demographic influences on driving performance and driving cessation in post-stroke drivers2016In: Advances in Transportation Studies, ISSN 1824-5463, no 38, p. 75-90Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Driving is a complex activity requiring highly integrated cognitive and perceptual functions that can be negatively affected following a stroke. The decision to continue or cease with driving after a stroke may not be exclusively dependent on deficits in cognitive and motor abilities. Instead, it is possible that social supports, alternative means of transportation, education level, income, self-regulation ability and the awareness of personal health problems may also influence the decision.

    Aim: The aim of this research was to explore the influence of personal and socioeconomic factors, in addition to existing cognitive impairment, on the decision of post-stroke adults to return to driving.

    Method: A case control design was employed to compare driving performance of 48 individuals who had experienced a stroke and 22 volunteer healthy control participants. Half of the post-stroke cohort (N=24) had continued driving and the other half had ceased driving. Socio-demographic and driving-related cognitive performance data were collected to characterise the comparison groups before driving performance was assessed in a driving simulator.

    Results: Overall, the post-stroke groups did not perform as well as the control participants in the cognitive and driving assessments. The perceived ability to drive after a stroke was not significantly correlated with participants'€™ actual driving ability. Post-stroke adults were more likely to continue driving if they reported having a tertiary level education and a greater income.

    Conclusion: The decision to return to driving after a stroke is a complicated, multifactorial process. This study confirms previous research, which found that cognition and driving performance are impaired poststroke. The findings also suggest that post-stroke drivers'€™ decision to return to driving was not linked to their ability to drive, but more to socio-demographic and environmental factors. Further screening tools and assessments to identify those at risk when returning to the road post-stroke are required. 

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