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  • 1.
    Abelsson, Anna
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science.
    Willman, Anna
    Department of Health Sciences, Karlstad University, Karlstad, Sweden.
    Ethics and aesthetics in injection treatments with Botox and Filler2021In: Journal of Women & Aging, ISSN 0895-2841, E-ISSN 1540-7322, Vol. 33, no 6, p. 583-595Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The medical nature of esthetic treatments is confusing, as the boundaries between medicine and beauty are unclear. A person's autonomous decision is an indicator for esthetic treatments that will improve their self-image, self-esteem and appearance to others. Robust ethical consideration is therefore necessary for the medical esthetician in each meeting with the client. This study aimed to describe medical estheticians' perceptions of ethics and esthetics in injection treatments with Botox and Filler. The results are described in Understanding what different clients desire, Reaching a mutual understanding of expectations and possibilities and Taking responsibility for beauty.

  • 2.
    Hanna, Esmée
    et al.
    Institute of Allied Health Sciences, De Montfort University, Leicester, United Kingdom.
    Robert, Glenn
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, The Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. IMPROVE (Improvement, innovation, and leadership in health and welfare). Department of Adult Nursing, King’s College London, London, United Kingdom.
    Ethics of limb disposal: Dignity and the medical waste stockpiling scandal2019In: Journal of Medical Ethics, ISSN 0306-6800, E-ISSN 1473-4257, Vol. 45, no 9, p. 575-578Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We draw on the concept of dignity to consider the ethics of the disposal of amputated limbs. The ethics of the management and disposal of human tissue has been subject to greater scrutiny and discussion in recent years, although the disposal of the limbs often remains absent from such discourses. In light of the recent UK controversy regarding failures in the medical waste disposal and the stockpiling of waste (including body parts), the appropriate handling of human tissue has been subject to further scrutiny. Although this scandal has evoked concern regarding procurement and supply chain issues, as well as possible health and safety risks from such a stockpile', the dignity of those patients' implicated in this controversy has been less widely discussed. Drawing at Foster's (2014) work, we argue that a dignity framework provides a useful lens to frame consideration of the disposal of limbs after amputation. Such a framework may be difficult to reconcile with the logic of business and the biovalue' of the medical waste, but would we argue afford more patient-centred approaches towards disposal. It may also facilitate better practices to help mitigate future stockpiling incidences. 

  • 3.
    Hedegaard, Joel
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Lifelong learning/Encell.
    Communication about patients during ward rounds and verbal handovers: A gender perspective2019In: Journal of Interprofessional Care, ISSN 1356-1820, E-ISSN 1469-9567, Vol. 33, no 6, p. 753-761Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article investigates gender patterns on how two interprofessional teams communicate about patients in their absence. Thirteen ward rounds and 17 verbal handovers were audio-recorded and analyzed through a qualitative content analysis. The ward rounds consisted of 1 physician and 2–4 nurses. The verbal handovers consisted of 2–3 nurses and as many assistant nurses. The data were collected at a cardiac clinic at a hospital in southern Sweden. The results indicate that when patients acted according to socially-accepted gender norms, the communication among the interprofessional teams was characterized as ‘professional’, including communication primarily about the medical situation of the patient and statements of a non-judgmental nature. When patients did not act according to socially-accepted gender norms, the communication among the interprofessional teams switched to become more ‘informal’, including non-medical oriented statements of a negative nature. When the healthcare workers take the patient’s psycho-social condition into account, as advocated by concepts like ‘holistic care’ and ‘patient-centered care’, the risk for speculation and arbitrariness may increase, especially within interprofessional teams who hold a nursing responsibility for patients. Establishing more defined guidelines of how non-medical aspects should be dealt with are thus of importance to the development of an equitable provision and delivery of healthcare.

  • 4.
    Israelsson, Magnus
    et al.
    Mittuniversitet, Institutionen för socialt arbete.
    Nordlöf, Kerstin
    Örebro Universitet.
    Gerdner, Arne
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Behavioural Science and Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Research Platform of Social Work.
    European laws on compulsory commitment to care of persons suffering from substance use disorders or misuse problems – a comparative review from a human and civil rights perspective2015In: Substance Abuse Treatment, Prevention, and Policy, E-ISSN 1747-597X, Vol. 10, p. 1-12, article id 34Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Laws on compulsory commitment to care (CCC) in mental health, social and criminal legislation for adult persons with alcohol and/or drug dependence or misuse problems are constructed to address different scenarios related to substance use disorders. This study examines how such CCC laws in European states vary in terms of legal rights, formal orders of decision and criteria for involuntary admission, and assesses whether three legal frameworks (criminal, mental and social law) equally well ensure human and civil rights.

    Methods

    Thirty-nine laws, from 38 countries, were analysed. Respondents replied in web-based questionnaires concerning a) legal rights afforded the persons with substance use problems during commitment proceedings, b) sources of formal application, c) instances for decision on admission, and d) whether or not 36 different criteria could function as grounds for decisions on CCC according to the law in question. Analysis of a-c were conducted in bivariate cross-tabulations. The 36 criteria for admission were sorted in criteria groups based on principal component analysis (PCA). To investigate whether legal rights, decision-making authorities or legal criteria may discriminate between types of law on CCC, discriminant analyses (DA) were conducted.

    Results

    There are few differences between the three types of law on CCC concerning legal rights afforded the individual. However, proper safeguards of the rights against unlawful detention seem still to be lacking in some CCC laws, regardless type of law. Courts are the decision-making body in 80 % of the laws, but this varies clearly between law types. Criteria for CCC also differ between types of law, i.e. concerning who should be treated: dependent offenders, persons with substance use problems with acting out or aggressive behaviors, or other vulnerable persons with alcohol or drug problems.

    Conclusion

    The study raises questions concerning whether various European CCC laws in relation to substance use disorder or misuse problems comply with international ratified conventions concerning human and civil rights. This, however, applies to all three types of law, i.e. social, mental health and criminal legislation. The main differences between law types concern legal criteria, reflecting different national priorities on implicit ambitions of CCC – for correction, for prevention, or for support to those in greatest need of care.

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  • 5.
    Jonasson, Lise-Lotte
    et al.
    Borås University, Sweden.
    Sandman, Lars
    Linköpings universitet, Avdelningen för hälso- och sjukvårdsanalys.
    Bremer, Anders
    Borås University, Sweden; Linnaeus University, Sweden.
    Managers experiences of ethical problems in municipal elderly care: a qualitative study of written reflections as part of leadership training2019In: Journal of Healthcare Leadership, E-ISSN 1179-3201, Vol. 11, p. 63-74Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Managers in elderly care have a complex ethical responsibility to address the needs and preferences of older persons while balancing the conflicting interests and requirements of relatives demands and nursing staffs work environment. In addition, managers must consider laws, guidelines, and organizational conditions that can cause ethical problems and dilemmas that need to be resolved. However, few studies have focused on the role of health care managers in the context of how they relate to and deal with ethical conflicts. Therefore, the aim of this study was to describe ethical problems experienced by managers in elderly care.

    Methods: We used a descriptive, interpretative design to analyze textual data from two examinations in leadership courses for managers in elderly care. A simple random selection of 100 out of 345 written exams was made to obtain a manageable amount of data. The data consisted of approximately 300 pages of single-spaced written text. Thematic analysis was used to evaluate the data.

    Results: The results show that managers perceive the central ethical conflicts relate to the older persons autonomy and values versus their needs and the values of the staff. Additionally, ethical dilemmas arise in relation to the relatives perspective of their loved ones needs and preferences. Legislations, guidelines, and a lack of resources create difficulties when managers perceive these factors as conflicting with the care needs of older persons.

    Conclusion: Managers in elderly care experience ethical conflicts that arise as unavoidable and perennial values conflicts, poorly substantiated values, and problematic organizational conditions. Structured approaches for identifying, reflecting on, and assessing ethical problems in the organization should therefore be implemented.

  • 6.
    Karlsson, Josefine
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Disciplinary Research.
    Experimentet med människor som spelpjäser: En etisk analys av Vipeholmexperimentet utifrån Beauchamp och Childress fyra etiska principer2021Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this essay is to investigate the ethical issues that permeated the carbohydrate experiment that was going on at Vipeholm's hospital for "uneducable insane" in Sweden. The material about the experiment is taken from Elin Bommenel's dissertation The Sugar Experiment: The Caries Experiments 1943–1960 at Vipeholm Hospital for the Insane. To create understanding, Beauchamp and Childress´s four ethical principles, which are used as ethical guidelines in health care, were used in the analysis of the experiment. The four principles are the principle of nonmaleficence, the principle of respect for autonomy, the principle of beneficence and the principle of justice.

    The analysis based on the four principles showed that the Vipeholme experiment is complex to understand as Beauchamp and Childress's principles provided a picture of the research which from many aspects cannot be seen as ethically correct. From other aspects, however, some elements can be supported by Beauchamp and Childress. The researchers had the task of investigating caries that would successfully help many people. Based on the principle of beneficence, one could imagine that the researchers acted correctly, but had no respect for the patients' autonomous decisions. The two principles are then in conflict with each other, something that critics of Beauchamp and Childress point out as a shortcoming.

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    fulltext
  • 7.
    Wadensten, Barbro
    et al.
    Uppsala University.
    Ahlström, Gerd
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Quality improvements, innovations and leadership in health care and social work.
    Ethical values in personal assistance: narratives of people with disabilities2009In: Nursing Ethics, ISSN 0969-7330, E-ISSN 1477-0989, Vol. 16, no 6, p. 759-774Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to investigate the experiences of persons with severe functional disabilities who receive personal assistance in their homes, the focus being on their daily life in relation to the ethical principles represented in the Swedish Disability Act: autonomy, integrity, influence and participation. Qualitative interviews were performed with 26 persons and thereafter subjected to qualitative latent content analysis. The experiences of personal assistance were very much in accordance with the said principles, the most important factor being that one is met with understanding. The participants described situations in which their integrity was violated in that they were not treated as competent adults. This indicates the importance of future efforts in nursing to support personal assistants with ethical knowledge and supervision so that they can empower people with disabilities and thereby enable them to maintain their self-esteem and dignity.

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