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  • 1. Agahi, Neda
    et al.
    Shaw, Ben
    Kåreholt, Ingemar
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology.
    Lennartsson, Carin
    Trajectories of social activities and mobility problems from middle to old age2012In: The 21st Nordic Congress of Gerontology, Dilemmas in Ageing Societies, Abstracts and Program, Copenhagen, Denmark, June 10th - 13th, 2012, 2012, p. 207-Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: To investigate how trajectories of social activities, suchas spending time with family and friends, observed during a34-year period (from middle age to old age) were associated withtrajectories of mobility problems during the same time periodamong men and women.Methods: Nationally representative data from the Swedish Levelof Living Survey (LNU) and the Swedish Panel Study of the OldestOld (SWEOLD) were used. LNU data from 1968, 1981, 1991 and2000 were merged with SWEOLD data from 1992 and 2002 tocreate a longitudinal dataset with four observation periodscovering the period 1968-2002. The sample consisted of thoseaged 40-60 years at baseline who survived through the period,and participated in at least three observation periods (n=698).Trajectories of social activity were identified through clusteranalysis, and then used as predictors of mobility trajectories inmultilevel regression models.Results: Most people had a socially active life as they moved frommiddle age into old age. Five trajectories of social activity wereidentified: continuously very active, continuously active,increasing social activity, decreasing social activity, and continuouslyinactive. Upholding a very active social life was morecommon among women than men.Mobility problems increased significantly over time for bothwomen and men. Among men, decreasing activity levels overtime were associated with a faster increase in mobility problems.Among women, those who were continuously inactive or whodecreased their activity levels had higher levels of mobilityproblems, but the increase in mobility problems with age wassimilar across trajectories of social activity.Conclusions: Most men and women had high levels of socialactivity in midlife, and continued their high activity levels into latelife. Decreasing social activity was related to worse mobility inboth men and women. The nature and direction of theseassociations need to be explored further.

  • 2. Ahacic, Kozma
    et al.
    Kennison, Robert F.
    Kåreholt, Ingemar
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology.
    Changes in sobriety in the Swedish population over three decades: age, period or cohort effects?2012In: Addiction, ISSN 0965-2140, E-ISSN 1360-0443, Vol. 107, no 4, p. 748-755Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims: This study aimed to examine age, cohort and period trends in alcohol abstinence.

    Design: Two surveys, the Level of Living Survey collected in 1968, 1974, 1981, 1990 and 2000, and the Swedish Panel Study of the Oldest Old (SWEOLD) collected in 1992 and 2002, were studied with graphical depictions of cross-sectional and longitudinal data presented over time and over age. Cross-sectional 10-year age group differences, time-lag differences between waves and within-cohort differences between waves for 10-year birth cohorts were examined. Logistic regression models were applied to confirm the observed patterns.

    Setting: The samples were representative of the Swedish population.

    Participants: Participants ranged in age from 18 to 75 (n = 5000 per wave), and 77+ at later waves (n = 500).

    Measurements: Alcohol abstinence was determined by asking 'Do you ever drink wine, beer, or spirits?', where a 'no' response indicated abstinence.

    Findings: Decreases in abstinence rates were observed from 1968 to 2000/02. While cross-sectional analysis indicated increased abstinence with advancing age, the longitudinal analysis suggested otherwise. Inspection of cohort differences revealed little change within cohorts and large differences between cohorts; abstinence rates declined in later-born cohorts up to the 1940s birth cohorts; stability was observed in cohorts born since the 1940s. Logistic regression models indicated that neither age nor period were significant (P > 0.05) predictors of abstinence when cohort (P < 0.001) was included.

    Conclusion: Decreasing proportions of total alcohol abstainers in Sweden from 1968 to 2000 appear to be attributable primarily to decreases in successive cohorts rather than drinkers becoming abstainers.

  • 3. Ahacic, Kozma
    et al.
    Trygged, Sven
    Kåreholt, Ingemar
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology.
    Income and education as predictors of stroke mortality after the survival of a first stroke2012In: Stroke Research and Treatment, ISSN 2090-8105, E-ISSN 2042-0056Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: It is well known that socioeconomic indicators, such as income and education, predict both stroke incidence and stroke mortality. This means that persons in lower socioeconomic positions are less likely to survive their stroke, and there will be a selective survival in the group discharged from hospital after their first stroke.

    Question: Does socioeconomic position continue to predict mortality, stroke specific, or from other causes, among patients surviving their first stroke in spite of this selective survival?

    Methods: All persons in Sweden aged 40–59 years who were discharged after a first hospitalization for stroke in 1996–2000 were included (n = 10,487), then followed up until the end of the fourth calendar year after discharge. Data were analysed with Cox regressions controlling for age, sex, and stroke type.

    Results: Persons with high socioeconomic position, measured by education and income, have lower mortality than those of low position. Education was not significant when adjusted for income, however. The risk of dying was similar for stroke-specific mortality and all-cause mortality, for those with cerebral infarction as well as for all patients.

    Conclusions: Socioeconomic position predicted stroke-specific mortality also in the selective group of persons who survived their first stroke.

  • 4.
    Ahlgren, Thorbjörn
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. SALVE (Social challenges, Actors, Living conditions, reseach VEnue).
    Kalin, Torbjörn
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. SALVE (Social challenges, Actors, Living conditions, reseach VEnue).
    Gerdner, Arne
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. SALVE (Social challenges, Actors, Living conditions, reseach VEnue).
    Self-rated child maltreatment, behavioural problems, and contacts with welfare and police authorities–longitudinal community data [Barns självrapporterade övergrepp, försummelse och beteendeproblem samt kontakter med anmälningsskyldiga verksamheter – baserat på en longitudinell befolkningsstudie]2021In: European Journal of Social Work, ISSN 1369-1457, E-ISSN 1468-2664, Vol. 24, no 4, p. 642-656Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study examines how children report abuse, neglect and behavioural problems and what authorities they claim to have had contact with that are legally mandated to report to the Child Welfare Services, e.g. health services and police. It draws data from a longitudinal research programme, LoRDIA, in which four data collections followed adolescents’ development from 12 to 15 years (n = 1884). A total of 61 indicators of self-reported child abuse, neglect and behavioural problems were constructed to identify children with severe exposure so that each indicator would have prompted referral. The main finding is that 445 (25.3%) of the study population reported severe exposure of this magnitude. Among these self-reported severely exposed children (SSE), boys reported higher rates of child neglect and of overall behavioural problems, specifically criminal and other socially destructive behaviour. Poverty and living in single-parent households significantly increase the risk of abuse, neglect, and behavioural problems. Increased risk of neglect and criminal behaviour were found for children studying Swedish as second language. The SSE children more than other children report contact with all authorities with mandatory reporting. Odds ratios of contact were higher in the case of behavioural problems compared to the odds ratios for abuse and neglect.

  • 5.
    Ahlstrand, Inger
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dept. of Rehabilitation. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT.
    Larsson, Ingrid
    School of Health and Welfare, Halmstad University, Halmstad, Sweden.
    Larsson, Margaretha
    School of Health and Education, University of Skövde, Skövde, Sweden.
    Ekman, Aimée
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dept. of Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. SALVE (Social challenges, Actors, Living conditions, reseach VEnue). Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT.
    Hedén, Lena
    Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare, University of Borås, Borås, Sweden.
    Laakso, Katja
    Institute of Health and Care Sciences, The Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Lindmark, Ulrika
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dept. of Natural Science and Biomedicine. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Centre for Oral Health. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ARN-J (Aging Research Network - Jönköping). Department of Health Sciences, Karlstad University, Karlstad, Sweden.
    Nunstedt, Håkan
    Department of Health Sciences, University West, Trollhättan, Sweden.
    Oxelmark, Lena
    Institute of Health and Care Sciences, The Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Pennbrant, Sandra
    Department of Health Sciences, University West, Trollhättan, Sweden.
    Sundler, Annelie J.
    Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare, University of Borås, Borås, Sweden.
    Hallgren, Jenny
    School of Health and Education, University of Skövde, Skövde, Sweden.
    Health-promoting factors among students in higher education within health care and social work: a cross-sectional analysis of baseline data in a multicentre longitudinal study2022In: BMC Public Health, E-ISSN 1471-2458, Vol. 22, no 1, article id 1314Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Educational environments are considered important in strengthening students’ health status and knowledge, which are associated with good educational outcomes. It has been suggested to establish healthy universities based on a salutogenic approach – namely, health promotion. The aim of this study was to describe health-promoting resources and factors among first-semester students in higher education in healthcare and social work.

    Methods: This cross-sectional study is based on a survey distributed among all students in seven healthcare and social work programmes at six universities in southern Sweden. The survey was carried out in 2018 using a self-reported, web-based questionnaire focussing on general health and well-being, lifestyle factors together with three validated instruments measuring health-promoting factors and processes: the Sense of Coherence (SOC) scale, Salutogenic Health Indicator Scale (SHIS) and Occupational Balance Questionnaire (OBQ).

    Results: Of 2283 students, 851 (37.3%) completed the survey, of whom 742 (87.1%) were women; 722 (84.8%) were enrolled on healthcare programmes, and 129 (15.2%) were enrolled on social work programmes. Most reported good general health and well-being (88.1% and 83.7%, respectively). The total mean scores for the SOC scale, SHIS and OBQ were, respectively, 59.09 (SD = 11.78), 44.04 (SD = 9.38) and 26.40 (SD = 7.07). Well-being and several healthy lifestyles were related to better general health and higher SOC, SHIS and OBQ scores. Multiple linear and logistic regressions showed that perceived well-being and no sleeping problems significantly predicted higher general health and higher SOC, SHIS and OBQ scores. Being less sedentary and non-smoking habits were significant predictors of higher SOC.

    Conclusions: Swedish students in higher education within the healthcare and social work sector report good general health and well-being in the first semester, as well as health-promoting resources (i.e. SOC, SHIS and OBQ), and in some aspects, a healthy lifestyle. High-intensity exercise, no sleeping problems and non-smoking seem to be of importance to both general health and health-promotive resources. This study contributes to knowledge about the health promotive characteristics of students in the healthcare and social work fields, which is of importance for planning universities with a salutogenic approach.

  • 6.
    Ahlström, Gerd
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science.
    Research Outcomes about Coping in Swedish populations: the Ways of Coping Questionnaire (WCQ)2009In: / [ed] Mehdi Ghazinour, Department of social work, Umeå University, Umeå University, 2009, p. 1-Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The lecture will present an overview of the development and results from the Swedish version of the WCQ. The process of translation of the original questionnaire into Swedish is described as well as the results of the first Swedish study about coping with illness-related problems in persons with chronic diseases compared with a group healthy subjects. The first findings indicated the importance of further testing of the psychometric properties of the WCQ. Further psychometric evaluation of the WCQ included 510 subjects (patients, their next of kin and students). The result indicated modest support for the 8-factor model and deviation from equality of factor structures among the sub-samples. The 8-factor model was more adequate in describing clinical than non-clinical samples. A modification of the WCQ with a version of 45 items was made based on the results, which is now current in several studies.

  • 7.
    Ahonen, Hanna
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT.
    Kvarnvik, Christine
    Folktandvården Region Jönköpings län.
    Broström, Anders
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Department of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT. Avdelningen för Klinisk Neurofysiologi, Linköpings Universitetssjukhus, Linköping.
    Fransson, Eleonor I.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Department of Clinical Diagnostics. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ARN-J (Aging Research Network - Jönköping). Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Inspektionen för Socialförsäkringen, Göteborg.
    Nygårdh, Annette
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Department of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, The Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. IMPROVE (Improvement, innovation, and leadership in health and welfare).
    Stensson, Malin
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Department of Clinical Diagnostics. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Centre for Oral Health. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Biomedical Platform.
    Lindmark, Ulrika
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Department of Clinical Diagnostics. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Centre for Oral Health. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ARN-J (Aging Research Network - Jönköping).
    Oral hälsa och obstruktiv sömnapné- protokoll för en longitudinell studie2019Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 8.
    Ahorsu, Daniel K.
    et al.
    Department of Rehabilitation Sciences, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hung Hom, Hong Kong.
    Lin, Chung-Ying
    Institute of Allied Health Sciences, College of Medicine, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan, Taiwan.
    Chen, I-Hua
    Chinese Academy of Education Big Data, Qufu Normal University, Qufu City, Shandong, China.
    Ullah, Irfan
    Kabir Medical College, Gandhara University, Peshawar, Pakistan.
    Shoib, Sheikh
    Sheikh Shoib Department of Psychiatry, Jawahar Lal Nehru Memorial Hospital, Srinagar, India.
    Zahid, Shafi U.
    Department of Neurosurgery, Jamhuriat hospital, Kabul, Afghanistan.
    Adjaottor, Emma S.
    Department of Behavioural Sciences, Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology, Ghana.
    Addo, Frimpong-Manso
    Department of Behavioural Sciences, Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology, Ghana.
    Pakpour, Amir H.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dept. of Nursing Science.
    The psychometric properties of motors of COVID-19 vaccination acceptance scale (MoVac-COVID19S): A dataset across five regions2022In: Data in Brief, E-ISSN 2352-3409, Vol. 42, article id 108103Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The novel coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) continues to plague the world. Hence, there is been an effort to mitigate this virus and its effects with several means including vaccination which is one of the most effective ways of controlling the virus. However, efforts at getting people to vaccinate have met several challenges. To help with understanding the reasons underlying an individual's willingness to take COVID-19 vaccine or not, a scale called Motors of COVID-19 Vaccination Acceptance Scale (MoVac-COVID19S) was developed. To expand its usability worldwide (as it has currently been limited to only China and Taiwan), data were collected in other countries (regions) too. Therefore, this MoVac-COVID19S data is from five countries (that is, India, Ghana, Afghanistan, Taiwan, and mainland China) which cut across five regions. A total of 6053 participants across the stated countries completed the survey between January and March 2021 using a cross-sectional survey design. The different sections of the survey solicited sociodemographic information (e.g., country, age, gender, educational level, and profession) and the MoVac-COVID19S data from the participants. The data collected from this survey were analyzed using descriptive statistics, which were carried out using the IBM SPSS version 22.0.

  • 9.
    Ahorsu, Daniel Kwasi
    et al.
    Hong Kong Polytech Univ, Dept Rehabil Sci, Hung Hom, Hong Kong 999077, Peoples R China..
    Lin, Chung-Ying
    Natl Cheng Kung Univ, Coll Med, Inst Allied Hlth Sci, Tainan 701, Taiwan..
    Alimoradi, Zainab
    Qazvin Univ Med Sci, Res Inst Prevent Noncommunicable Dis, Social Determinants Hlth Res Ctr, Qazvin 3419759811, Iran..
    Griffiths, Mark D.
    Nottingham Trent Univ, Psychol Dept, Nottingham NG1 4FQ, England..
    Chen, Hsin-Pao
    E DA Hosp, Dept Surg, Div Colon & Rectal Surg, Kaohsiung 824, Taiwan.;I Shou Univ, Coll Med, Sch Med, Kaohsiung 824, Taiwan..
    Broström, Anders
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT. Jonkoping Univ, Sch Hlth & Welf, Dept Nursing, S-55333 Jonkoping, Sweden..
    Timpka, Toomas
    Linkoping Univ, Dept Hlth Med & Caring Sci, S-58183 Linkoping, Sweden..
    Pakpour, Amir H.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Qazvin Univ Med Sci, Res Inst Prevent Noncommunicable Dis, Social Determinants Hlth Res Ctr, Qazvin 3419759811, Iran.;Jonkoping Univ, Sch Hlth & Welf, Dept Nursing, S-55333 Jonkoping, Sweden..
    Cyberchondria, Fear of COVID-19, and Risk Perception Mediate the Association between Problematic Social Media Use and Intention to Get a COVID-19 Vaccine2022In: Vaccines, E-ISSN 2076-393X, Vol. 10, no 1, article id 122Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Vaccination is the most effective way to control the COVID-19 pandemic, but vaccination hesitancy threatens this effort worldwide. Consequently, there is a need to understand what influences individuals' intention to get a COVID-19 vaccine. Restriction of information gathering on societal developments to social media may influence attitudes towards COVID-19 vaccination through exposure to disinformation and imbalanced arguments. The present study examined the association between problematic social media use and intention to get the COVID-19 vaccine, taking into account the mediating roles of cyberchondria, fear of COVID-19, and COVID-19 risk perception. In a cross-sectional survey study, a total of 10,843 residents of Qazvin City, Iran completed measures on problematic social media use, fear of COVID-19, cyberchondria, COVID-19 risk perception, and intention to get a COVID-19 vaccine. The data were analyzed using structural equation modeling (SEM). The results showed that there was no direct association between problematic social media use and intention to get a COVID-19 vaccine. Nonetheless, cyberchondria, fear of COVID-19, and COVID-19 risk perception (each or serially) mediated associations between problematic social media use and intention to get a COVID-19 vaccine. These results add to the understanding of the role of problematic social media use in COVID-19 vaccine hesitancy, i.e., it is not the quantity of social media use per se that matters. This knowledge of the mediating roles of cyberchondria, fear of COVID-19, and COVID-19 risk perception can be used by public health experts and policymakers when planning educational interventions and other initiatives in COVID-19 vaccination programs.

  • 10.
    Ahorsu, Daniel Kwasi
    et al.
    Hong Kong Polytech Univ, Kowloon, Fac Hlth & Social Sci, Dept Rehabil Sci, Hong Kong, Peoples R China..
    Lin, Chung-Ying
    Natl Cheng Kung Univ, Coll Med, Inst Allied Hlth Sci, Tainan, Taiwan..
    Marznaki, Zohreh Hosseini
    Mazandaran Univ Med Sci, Amol Fac Nursing & Midwifery, Dept Nursing, Sari, Iran..
    Pakpour, Amir H.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dept. of Nursing Science. Qazvin Univ Med Sci, Res Inst Prevent Noncommunicable Dis, Social Determinants Hlth Res Ctr, Qazvin, Iran.;Jonkoping Univ, Sch Hlth & Welf, Dept Nursing, Jonkoping, Sweden..
    The association between fear of COVID-19 and mental health: The mediating roles of burnout and job stress among emergency nursing staff2022In: Nursing Open, E-ISSN 2054-1058, Vol. 9, no 2, p. 1147-1154Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: This current study examined the mediation roles of burnout and job stress in the association between fear of COVID-19 and mental health among emergency nurses.

    Design: Cross-sectional survey. Design: Cross-sectional survey.

    Methods: A total of 516 emergency nurses with a mean age of 41.18 (SD = 8.24), mostly females (76.16%) and married (78.9%) responded to measures on fear of COVID-19, burnout, job stress and mental health between 15 September and 7 November 2020.

    Results: There was a significantly direct effect between (a) fear of COVID-19 and mental health, (b) fear of COVID-19 and mediators (burnout and job stress) and (c) mediators (burnout and job stress) and mental health. Also, there was a significantly indirect effect between fear of COVID-19 and mental health through job stress, burnout or both.

    Conclusions: Fear of COVID-19 directly and indirectly influenced the mental health of emergency nurses. Therefore, hospital authorities should provide sufficient resources to allay the fears of nurses during this COVID-19 pandemic period.

  • 11.
    Ahorsu, Daniel Kwasi
    et al.
    Hong Kong Polytech Univ, Fac Hlth & Social Sci, Dept Rehabil Sci, Hung Hom, Hong Kong, Peoples R China..
    Lin, Chung-Ying
    Natl Cheng Kung Univ, Coll Med, Inst Allied Hlth Sci, Tainan, Taiwan..
    Yahaghai, Rafat
    Qazvin Univ Med Sci, Social Determinants Hlth Res Ctr, Res Inst Prevent Noncommunicable Dis, Qazvin, Iran.
    Alimoradi, Zainab
    Qazvin Univ Med Sci, Social Determinants Hlth Res Ctr, Res Inst Prevent Noncommunicable Dis, Qazvin, Iran.
    Broström, Anders
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dept. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT.
    Griffiths, Mark D.
    Nottingham Trent Univ, Psychol Dept, Nottingham, England.
    Pakpour, Amir H.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dept. of Nursing Science. Qazvin Univ Med Sci, Social Determinants Hlth Res Ctr, Res Inst Prevent Noncommunicable Dis, Qazvin, Iran.
    The mediational role of trust in the healthcare system in the association between generalized trust and willingness to get COVID-19 vaccination in Iran2022In: Human Vaccines & Immunotherapeutics, ISSN 2164-5515, E-ISSN 2164-554X, Vol. 18, no 1, p. 1-8Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    For some individuals, there appears to be some level of unwillingness in getting a COVID-19 vaccine which may be due to trust issues. The present study used a mediation model to investigate how trust is associated with an individual's willingness to get COVID-19 vaccination among Iranians. A total of 10,843 Iranian adults were recruited in Qazvin province using a multistage stratified cluster sampling method. The survey was completed between February 19 and April 9, 2021. The findings showed that generalized trust was positively associated with trust in the healthcare system, trust in the healthcare system was positively associated with willingness to get COVID-19 vaccination, and generalized trust was positively associated with willingness to get COVID-19 vaccination. Also, trust in the healthcare system mediated the association between generalized trust and willingness to get COVID-19 vaccination. There were some significant demographic differences in COVID-19 vaccination willingness. The findings suggest that generalized trust plays a significant role in directly or indirectly influencing individuals' willingness to get COVID-19 vaccine. Therefore, government bodies and health officials may utilize these findings to appeal in a more transparent and professional manner in encouraging individuals to get a COVID-19 vaccine. However, for those with lower trust levels (in general and in the healthcare system), the focus may be to re-build and/or regain the individuals' trust through carefully planned transparent communication, information dissemination, and ethical education to help increase the uptake of COVID-19 vaccination.

  • 12.
    Aktaş, Vezir
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Lifelong learning/Encell.
    Nilsson, Marco
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Sustainable Societies (SUS).
    Kindap Tepe, Yeliz
    Ondokuz Mayıs Üniversitesi.
    Gendered aspects of policies to fight the COVID-19 outbreak2023In: Humanitas, ISSN 2147-088X, Vol. 11, no 22, p. 42-64Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Countries have taken different measures to limit the spread of COVID-19. However, it is unclear how such measures affect the daily lives of people in different cultural contexts. Using a qualitative research method and the framework of gender roles, this study analyzes the potential effects of the Turkish government’s policies to fight the COVID-19 pandemic on married men and women in Turkey. The respondents answered the open-ended questions developed by the researchers on the Google platform. 20 men (aged 27-54) and 20 women (aged 22-55) participated in the study. The respondents’ experiences were grouped into three themes: gender-related problems; adaptation and new habits/hobbies; and balancing between positive and negative effects. While men stressed the economic effects, women focused on social relations or deeper values of life. The findings were discussed within the framework of Gender Schema Theory and Social Role Theory.

  • 13.
    Alijanzadeh, M.
    et al.
    Social Determinants of Health Research Center, Research Institute for Prevention of Non-Communicable Diseases, Qazvin University of Medical Sciences, Qazvin, 3419759811, Iran.
    Ahorsu, D. K.
    Department of Rehabilitation Sciences, Faculty of Health & Social Sciences, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, 11 Yuk Choi Rd Hung Hom, Hong Kong.
    Alimoradi, Z.
    Social Determinants of Health Research Center, Research Institute for Prevention of Non-Communicable Diseases, Qazvin University of Medical Sciences, Qazvin, 3419759811, Iran.
    Mahmoudi, N.
    Social Determinants of Health Research Center, Research Institute for Prevention of Non-Communicable Diseases, Qazvin University of Medical Sciences, Qazvin, 3419759811, Iran.
    Griffiths, M. D.
    Psychology Department, Nottingham Trent University, Nottingham, NG3 5DS, United Kingdom.
    Lin, C. -Y
    Institute of Allied Health Sciences, College of Medicine, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan, 701401, Taiwan.
    Liu, H. -K
    Department of Pediatrics, E-DA Hospital, Kaohsiung, 82445, Taiwan.
    Pakpour, Amir H.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science.
    Fear of covid-19 and trust in the healthcare system mediates the association between individual’s risk perception and preventive covid-19 behaviours among iranians2021In: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, ISSN 1661-7827, E-ISSN 1660-4601, Vol. 18, no 22, article id 12146Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Problems caused by the novel coronavirus disease-2019 (COVID-19) and its mutations have brought challenges in pandemic control for all countries worldwide. The present study examines the mediating roles of fear of COVID-19 and trust in the healthcare system in the association between individual’s risk perception and performing preventive COVID-19 behaviours among Iranians. A cross-sectional study design was used to collect data from 3652 residents of Qazvin province in Iran from 3 February to 15 April 2021 using a multistage stratified cluster sampling method. Participants responded to an online questionnaire concerning their fear of COVID-19, risk perception, trust in the healthcare system, and preventive COVID-19 behaviours. Small to medium positive interrelationships were observed between the variables of the study. Fear of COVID-19, trust in the healthcare system or both (fear of COVID-19 and trust in the healthcare system) mediated the association between an individual’s risk perception and performing preventive COVID-19 behaviours. The study demonstrated there are at least four ways through which an individual’s risk perception can influence preventive COVID-19 behaviours. Therefore, clinicians, health communicators, and researchers may capitalize on these findings to enhance preventive COVID-19 behaviours to help mitigate the spread of COVID-19 infection.

  • 14.
    Alijanzadeh, Mehran
    et al.
    Qazvin Univ Med Sci, Social Determinants Hlth Res Ctr, Res Inst Prevent Noncommunicable Dis, Qazvin 3419759811, Iran..
    Lin, Chung-Ying
    Natl Cheng Kung Univ, Coll Med, Inst Allied Hlth Sci, Tainan 70101, Taiwan.;Natl Cheng Kung Univ, Natl Cheng Kung Univ Hosp, Coll Med, Biostat Consulting Ctr, Tainan 70101, Taiwan..
    Yahaghi, Rafat
    Qazvin Univ Med Sci, Social Determinants Hlth Res Ctr, Res Inst Prevent Noncommunicable Dis, Qazvin 3419759811, Iran..
    Rahmani, Jalal
    Qazvin Univ Med Sci, Social Determinants Hlth Res Ctr, Res Inst Prevent Noncommunicable Dis, Qazvin 3419759811, Iran..
    Yazdi, Nahid
    Qazvin Univ Med Sci, Social Determinants Hlth Res Ctr, Res Inst Prevent Noncommunicable Dis, Qazvin 3419759811, Iran..
    Jafari, Elahe
    Qazvin Univ Med Sci, Social Determinants Hlth Res Ctr, Res Inst Prevent Noncommunicable Dis, Qazvin 3419759811, Iran..
    Alijani, Hashem
    Qazvin Univ Med Sci, Social Determinants Hlth Res Ctr, Res Inst Prevent Noncommunicable Dis, Qazvin 3419759811, Iran..
    Zamani, Narges
    Qazvin Univ Med Sci, Social Determinants Hlth Res Ctr, Res Inst Prevent Noncommunicable Dis, Qazvin 3419759811, Iran..
    Fotuhi, Razie
    Qazvin Univ Med Sci, Social Determinants Hlth Res Ctr, Res Inst Prevent Noncommunicable Dis, Qazvin 3419759811, Iran..
    Taherkhani, Elham
    Qazvin Univ Med Sci, Social Determinants Hlth Res Ctr, Res Inst Prevent Noncommunicable Dis, Qazvin 3419759811, Iran..
    Buchali, Zeinab
    Qazvin Univ Med Sci, Social Determinants Hlth Res Ctr, Res Inst Prevent Noncommunicable Dis, Qazvin 3419759811, Iran..
    Jafari, Robabe
    Qazvin Univ Med Sci, Social Determinants Hlth Res Ctr, Res Inst Prevent Noncommunicable Dis, Qazvin 3419759811, Iran..
    Mahmoudi, Narges
    Qazvin Univ Med Sci, Social Determinants Hlth Res Ctr, Res Inst Prevent Noncommunicable Dis, Qazvin 3419759811, Iran..
    Poorzolfaghar, Leila
    Qazvin Univ Med Sci, Social Determinants Hlth Res Ctr, Res Inst Prevent Noncommunicable Dis, Qazvin 3419759811, Iran..
    Ahmadizade, Safie
    Qazvin Univ Med Sci, Social Determinants Hlth Res Ctr, Res Inst Prevent Noncommunicable Dis, Qazvin 3419759811, Iran..
    Shahbazkhania, Azam
    Qazvin Univ Med Sci, Social Determinants Hlth Res Ctr, Res Inst Prevent Noncommunicable Dis, Qazvin 3419759811, Iran..
    Alimoradi, Zainab
    Qazvin Univ Med Sci, Social Determinants Hlth Res Ctr, Res Inst Prevent Noncommunicable Dis, Qazvin 3419759811, Iran..
    Pakpour, Amir H.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dept. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, The Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare. Qazvin Univ Med Sci, Social Determinants Hlth Res Ctr, Res Inst Prevent Noncommunicable Dis, Qazvin 3419759811, Iran..
    Measurement Invariance and Differential Item Functioning of the Health Literacy Instrument for Adults (HELIA): A Large-Scale Cross-Sectional Study in Iran2022In: Healthcare, E-ISSN 2227-9032, Vol. 10, no 10, article id 2064Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Health literacy is important for health behavior engagement. Therefore, it is important to have a good instrument assessing health literacy with a theoretical framework. The present study aimed to examine the measurement invariance and differential item functioning (DIF) of a newly developed health literacy instrument; that is, the Health Literacy Instrument for Adults (HELIA). Confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) and Rasch models were used to examine the data collected from a large Iranian sample (N = 9678; 67.3% females; mean age = 36.44 years). All the participants completed the HELIA. CFA was used to examine if the HELIA had a five-factor structure (including reading, access to information, understanding, appraisal, and decision making/behavioral intention factors) and multigroup CFA to examine if the five-factor structure of HELIA was invariant across gender, educational level, accommodation, and age subgroups. Rasch models were used to examine whether each factor of HELIA was unidimensional and DIF contrast in Rasch to examine if the HELIA items were interpreted similarly across the aforementioned subgroups. The CFA results supported the five-factor structure of HELIA, and the Rasch models verified that each HELIA factor is unidimensional. Additionally, multigroup CFA supported the measurement invariance of HELIA across the following subgroups: male vs. female; highly educated vs. poorly educated; city residents vs. suburban residents; and younger age vs. older age. The DIF contrasts in the Rasch models additionally showed that there are no substantial DIF items in the HELIA across aforementioned subgroups. Therefore, the HELIA is a feasible and comprehensive instrument assessing health literacy across different populations in Iran.

  • 15.
    Alijanzadeh, Mehran
    et al.
    Social Determinants of Health Research Center, Research Institute for Prevention of Non-Communicable Diseases, Qazvin University of Medical Sciences, Qazvin, Iran.
    Yahaghi, Rafat
    Social Determinants of Health Research Center, Research Institute for Prevention of Non-Communicable Diseases, Qazvin University of Medical Sciences, Qazvin, Iran.
    Rahmani, Jalal
    Social Determinants of Health Research Center, Research Institute for Prevention of Non-Communicable Diseases, Qazvin University of Medical Sciences, Qazvin, Iran.
    Yazdi, Nahid
    Social Determinants of Health Research Center, Research Institute for Prevention of Non-Communicable Diseases, Qazvin University of Medical Sciences, Qazvin, Iran.
    Jafari, Elahe
    Social Determinants of Health Research Center, Research Institute for Prevention of Non-Communicable Diseases, Qazvin University of Medical Sciences, Qazvin, Iran.
    Alijani, Hashem
    Social Determinants of Health Research Center, Research Institute for Prevention of Non-Communicable Diseases, Qazvin University of Medical Sciences, Qazvin, Iran.
    Zamani, Narges
    Social Determinants of Health Research Center, Research Institute for Prevention of Non-Communicable Diseases, Qazvin University of Medical Sciences, Qazvin, Iran.
    Fotuhi, Razie
    Social Determinants of Health Research Center, Research Institute for Prevention of Non-Communicable Diseases, Qazvin University of Medical Sciences, Qazvin, Iran.
    Taherkhani, Elham
    Social Determinants of Health Research Center, Research Institute for Prevention of Non-Communicable Diseases, Qazvin University of Medical Sciences, Qazvin, Iran.
    Buchali, Zeinab
    Social Determinants of Health Research Center, Research Institute for Prevention of Non-Communicable Diseases, Qazvin University of Medical Sciences, Qazvin, Iran.
    Zarenejad, Masoume
    Social Determinants of Health Research Center, Research Institute for Prevention of Non-Communicable Diseases, Qazvin University of Medical Sciences, Qazvin, Iran.
    Mahmoudi, Narges
    Social Determinants of Health Research Center, Research Institute for Prevention of Non-Communicable Diseases, Qazvin University of Medical Sciences, Qazvin, Iran.
    Shahmahdi, Najmeh
    Social Determinants of Health Research Center, Research Institute for Prevention of Non-Communicable Diseases, Qazvin University of Medical Sciences, Qazvin, Iran.
    Poorzolfaghar, Leila
    Social Determinants of Health Research Center, Research Institute for Prevention of Non-Communicable Diseases, Qazvin University of Medical Sciences, Qazvin, Iran.
    Ahmadizade, Safie
    Social Determinants of Health Research Center, Research Institute for Prevention of Non-Communicable Diseases, Qazvin University of Medical Sciences, Qazvin, Iran.
    Shahbazkhania, Azam
    Social Determinants of Health Research Center, Research Institute for Prevention of Non-Communicable Diseases, Qazvin University of Medical Sciences, Qazvin, Iran.
    Gozal, David
    Department of Child Health, University of Missouri School of Medicine, Columbia, MO, United States.
    Lin, Chung-Ying
    Institute of Allied Health Sciences, College of Medicine, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan, Taiwan; Biostatistics Consulting Center, National Cheng Kung University Hospital, College of Medicine, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan, Taiwan; Department of Public Health, College of Medicine, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan, Taiwan; Department of Occupational Therapy, College of Medicine, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan, Taiwan.
    Pakpour, Amir H.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Department of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, The Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare. Social Determinants of Health Research Center, Research Institute for Prevention of Non-Communicable Diseases, Qazvin University of Medical Sciences, Qazvin, Iran.
    Sleep hygiene behaviours mediate the association between health/e-health literacy and mental wellbeing2023In: Health Expectations, ISSN 1369-6513, E-ISSN 1369-7625, Vol. 26, no 6, p. 2349-2360Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Health literacy and e-health literacy are important factors helping people shape awareness of health behaviours in different aspects, including sleep hygiene behaviours. Good sleep hygiene behaviours promote sleep quality and are beneficial to overall mental wellbeing.

    Objective

    We aimed to examine if sleep hygiene behaviours may mediate the association between health literacy/e-health literacy and mental wellbeing.

    Methods

    Adult Iranian subjects (n = 9775; mean [SD] age = 36.44 [11.97] years; 67.3% females) completed the Health Literacy Instrument for Adults, eHealth Literacy Scale, three items on sleep hygiene behaviour that have been used in prior research and the Short Warwick Edinburgh Mental Wellbeing Scale. Data were then subjected to structural equation modelling (SEM) including 500 bootstrapping resampling to examine whether sleep hygiene is a mediator in the relationship between health literacy/e-health literacy and mental wellbeing.

    Findings

    Both health literacy and e-health literacy were significantly associated with mental wellbeing (r = .63 for health literacy and .39 for e-health literacy; p < .001) and sleep hygiene behaviours (r = .58 for health literacy and .36 for e-health literacy; p < .001). Sleep hygiene behaviours were significantly associated with mental wellbeing (r = .42; p < .001). Moreover, SEM that incorporated bootstrapping approaches indicated that sleep hygiene behaviours were significant mediators in the association between health literacy/e-health literacy and mental wellbeing.

    Conclusions

    We conclude that health literacy and e-health literacy are associated with mental health wellbeing in the Iranian population. Additionally, the association could be mediated via sleep hygiene behaviours.

    Patient or Public Contribution

    The study was co-designed with healthcare providers from the vice-Chancellor's Office for Health Affairs of Qazvin University of Medical Sciences as equal partners. Moreover, the women's health volunteers were involved in the design of the study.

  • 16.
    Alimoradi, Z.
    et al.
    Social Determinants of Health Research Center, Research Institute for Prevention of Non-communicable Diseases, Qazvin University of Medical Sciences, Qazvin, Iran.
    Bahrami, N.
    Social Determinants of Health Research Center, Research Institute for Prevention of Non-communicable Diseases, Qazvin University of Medical Sciences, Qazvin, Iran.
    Khodaparast, S.
    Social Determinants of Health Research Center, Research Institute for Prevention of Non-communicable Diseases, Qazvin University of Medical Sciences, Qazvin, Iran.
    Griffiths, M. D.
    Psychology Department, Nottingham Trent University, Nottingham, United Kingdom.
    Pakpour, Amir H.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Department of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, The Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare.
    Mediating role of psychological distress and domestic violence in the association of fear of COVID-19 with marital satisfaction and sexual quality of life among women of reproductive age: An Iranian cross-sectional study2023In: BMJ Open, E-ISSN 2044-6055, Vol. 13, no 2Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVES: This study aimed to determine the mediating role of psychological distress and domestic violence in the association of fear of COVID-19 with marital satisfaction and sexual quality of life (QoL) among Iranian women of reproductive age. METHODS: A cross-sectional study comprising 324 married women was conducted. Online convenience sampling was used to collect data. SPSS PROCESS macro was used for the mediation analysis. The direct and indirect effects of the fear of COVID-19 on sexual QoL and marital satisfaction were estimated comprising a 95% CI using 5000 bootstrap samples. Pairwise comparisons between the mediators were calculated by Hayes' macros. RESULTS: A positive/negative or suspected history of COVID-19 infection had marginally significant relationship with marital satisfaction (p=0.049). The total effect of fear of COVID-19 on sexual QoL was significant (b=-1.31, SE=0.20, p<0.001). Fear of COVID-19 had no significant direct effect on sexual QoL (b=-0.22, SE=0.19, p=0.24) but it had an indirect effect on sexual QoL via mediation of psychological distress (b=-0.34, SE=0.09, 95% CI: -0.53 to -0.19) and domestic violence (b=-0.75, SE=0.18, 95% CI: -1.12 to -0.40). The total effect of fear of COVID-19 on marital satisfaction was significant (b=-1.91, SE=0.32, p<0.001). Fear of COVID-19 had no significant direct effect (b=0.20, SE=0.25, p=0.42) on marital satisfaction but it had an indirect effect on marital satisfaction via mediation of psychological distress (b=-0.59, SE=0.13, 95% CI: -0.86 to -0.36) and domestic violence (b=-1.51, SE=0.29, 95% CI: -2.08 to -0.92). CONCLUSION: The fear of COVID-19 during the pandemic indirectly decreased women's marital satisfaction and sexual QoL via increased psychological distress and domestic violence. Consequently, in critical situations such as the COVID-19 pandemic, improving couples' psychological health and reducing domestic violence are likely to improve women's sexual QoL and marital satisfaction.

  • 17.
    Alimoradi, Z.
    et al.
    Social Determinants of Health Research Center, Research Institute for Prevention of Non-Communicable Diseases, Qazvin University of Medical Sciences, Qazvin, Iran.
    Broström, Anders
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dept. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT.
    Ohayon, M. M.
    Stanford Sleep Epidemiology Research Center (SSERC), School of Medicine, Stanford University, CA, United States.
    Lin, C. -Y
    Institute of Allied Health Sciences, College of Medicine, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan, Taiwan.
    Griffiths, M. D.
    International Gaming Research Unit, Psychology Department, Nottingham Trent University, Nottingham, United Kingdom.
    Jernelöv, S.
    Centre for Psychiatry Research, Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Karolinska Institutet, & Stockholm Health Care Services, Huddinge Hospital, Region Stockholm, M58, Stockholm, SE-141 86, Sweden.
    Kaldo, V.
    Centre for Psychiatry Research, Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Karolinska Institutet, & Stockholm Health Care Services, Huddinge Hospital, Region Stockholm, M58, Stockholm, SE-141 86, Sweden.
    Pakpour, Amir H.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dept. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, The Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare.
    Reply to Liu et al.: “Effects of cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia (CBT-I) on quality of life: A systematic review and meta-analysis”2022In: Sleep Medicine Reviews, ISSN 1087-0792, E-ISSN 1532-2955, Vol. 66, article id 101699Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 18.
    Alimoradi, Z.
    et al.
    Social Determinants of Health Research Center, Q Research Institute for Prevention of Non-Communicable Diseases, Qazvin University of Medical Sciences, Qazvin, Iran.
    Ghorbani, S.
    Students’ Research Committee, Qazvin University of Medical Sciences, Qazvin, Iran.
    Bahrami, N.
    Social Determinants of Health Research Center, Q Research Institute for Prevention of Non-Communicable Diseases, Qazvin University of Medical Sciences, Qazvin, Iran.
    Griffiths, M. D.
    International Gaming Research Unit, Psychology Department, Nottingham Trent University, Nottingham, United Kingdom.
    Pakpour, Amir H.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dept. of Nursing Science.
    Socio-demographic predictors of dyadic sexual communication among Iranian married women2022In: Sexologies: revue europeenne de sante sexuelle - european journal of sexual health, ISSN 1158-1360, E-ISSN 1878-1829, Vol. 31, no 4, p. 311-317Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background and aim: Couples’ communication concerning sexual issues is influenced by various individual and social factors. The present study investigated the socio-demographic predictors of dyadic sexual communication among married women of reproductive age.

    Methods: A cross-sectional survey study was conducted from May to October 2019 in comprehensive health centers of Qazvin City, Iran. The participants comprised 400 married women with mean age of 35.66 years recruited via a two-stage sampling method. The Dyadic Sexual Communication Scale (DSCS) and a socio-demographic questionnaire were used for data collection. Univariable and multivariable linear regression models with a significance level of 0.05 were used for statistical analysis.

    Results: The mean score of sexual communication was 59.19 out of 78 (SD = 12.63). Based on multivariable linear regression model, life satisfaction (β = 0.34 high vs. moderate), frequency of sexual intercourse (β = 0.20), moderate vs. poor economic status (β = 0.12), and using contraception (β = −0.09) were predictors of good dyadic sexual communication. These variables explained 32% of the variance concerning dyadic sexual communication among married women of reproductive age.

    Conclusion: Life satisfaction, frequency of sexual intercourse, moderate economic status, and using contraception were predictors of good dyadic sexual communication.

  • 19.
    Alimoradi, Z.
    et al.
    Social Determinants of Health Research Center, Research Institute for Prevention of Non-Communicable Diseases, Qazvin University of Medical Sciences, Qazvin, Iran.
    Jafari, E.
    Social Determinants of Health Research Center, Research Institute for Prevention of Non-Communicable Diseases, Qazvin University of Medical Sciences, Qazvin, Iran.
    Broström, Anders
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dept. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT.
    Ohayon, M. M.
    Stanford Sleep Epidemiology Research Center (SSERC), School of Medicine, Stanford University, CA, United States.
    Lin, C. -Y
    Institute of Allied Health Sciences, College of Medicine, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan, Taiwan.
    Griffiths, M. D.
    International Gaming Research Unit, Psychology Department, Nottingham Trent University, Nottingham, United Kingdom.
    Blom, K.
    Centre for Psychiatry Research, Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Karolinska Institutet, & Stockholm.
    Jernelöv, S.
    Centre for Psychiatry Research, Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Karolinska Institutet, & Stockholm.
    Kaldo, V.
    Centre for Psychiatry Research, Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Karolinska Institutet, & Stockholm.
    Pakpour, Amir H.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dept. of Nursing Science.
    Effects of cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia (CBT-I) on quality of life: A systematic review and meta-analysis2022In: Sleep Medicine Reviews, ISSN 1087-0792, E-ISSN 1532-2955, Vol. 64, article id 101646Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The effects of cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia (CBT-I) have consistently been shown to improve insomnia symptoms and other health-related outcomes, but the effects on QoL have been inconsistent. Many factors including the type CBT-I delivery and type of instrument used to assess QoL make the topic complex. The present systematic review and meta-analysis synthesized the evidence of CBT-I efficacy on QoL outcomes across different populations, delivery modes, and methodological aspects. Following the guidelines on preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA), a literature search was conducted through PubMed, Web of Science, Scopus, and PsycINFO using keywords from relevant MeSH terms based on PICOS (Participants, Intervention, Comparison, Outcome and Study) criteria. Clinical trials investigating the effect of CBT-I as an intervention on QoL with any kind of control group were eligible if they reported mean scores and variation of QoL. Meta-analysis using a random-effect model was conducted to calculate the standardized mean differences (SMDs) in a set including all identified studies, as well as in three sub-sets: face-to-face CBT-I using randomized controlled trials (RCTs), online CBT-I using RCTs, and one-group pre- and post-treatment design. A total of 24 studies comprising 1977 participants (808 in an intervention group) from 12 countries were eligible for meta-analysis. The overall pooled estimate of SMD of QoL when all 24 studies were included was 0.47 (95% CI: 0.22; 0.72; I2 = 84.5%; tau2 = 0.31; p &lt; 0.001). The overall pooled estimate of SMD of QoL was 0.46 (95% CI: 0.01–0.90; I2 = 87.5%; tau2 = 0.48, p &lt; 0.001) for intervention groups with face-to-face CBT-I compared to controls; 0.47 (95% CI: 0.02–0.92; I2 = 88.3%; tau2 = 0.36; p = 0.04) for intervention groups with digital CBT-I compared to controls, and 0.46 (95% CI: 0.12–0.80; I2 = 52.9%; tau2 = 0.07; p = 0.08) for one-group pre- and post-comparison using CBT-I intervention compared to baseline. Moreover, effects of CBT-I on QoL were different across populations (pooled SMD = 0.59 for patients with insomnia; 0.29 for patients with insomnia comorbid with another major disorder; and 0.48 for other conditions) and types of QoL instruments (pooled SMD = 0.36 for disease-specific QoL instrument not on insomnia, 0.43 for generic QoL instrument, and 0.67 for a single-QoL-item instrument). The probability of publication bias was ruled out in overall and design specific sub-group analysis based on funnel plot and Egger's test. In conclusion, this meta-analysis confirmed a moderate, overall effect of CBT-I in improving QoL. However, due to small power and heterogeneity, future studies are needed to better explore the impact of moderating factors such as mode of delivery and type of QoL measure for assessment used.

  • 20.
    Alimoradi, Z.
    et al.
    Social Determinants of Health Research Center, Qazvin University of Medical Sciences, Qazvin, Iran.
    Lin, C. -Y
    Institute of Allied Health Sciences, College of Medicine, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan, Taiwan.
    Pakpour, Amir H.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dept. of Nursing Science.
    Coronavirus disease-19 vaccine inequity and gross domestic product2021In: Asian Journal of Social Health and Behavior, ISSN 2772-4204, Vol. 4, no 4, p. 129-130Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 21.
    Alimoradi, Z.
    et al.
    Social Determinants of Health Research Center, Qazvin University of Medical Sciences, Qazvin, Iran.
    Lin, C. -Y
    Institute of Allied Health Sciences, College of Medicine, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan, Taiwan.
    Pakpour, Amir H.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dept. of Nursing Science.
    Domestic violence during COVID-19 pandemic: An issue that needs comprehensive attention and intervention2022In: Asian Journal of Social Health and Behavior, ISSN 2772-4204, Vol. 5, no 1, p. 1-2Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 22.
    Alimoradi, Z.
    et al.
    Social Determinants of Health Research Center, Research Institute for Prevention of Non-Communicable Diseases, Qazvin University of Medical Sciences, Qazvin, 3415613911, Iran.
    Lin, C. -Y
    Institute of Allied Health Sciences, College of Medicine, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan, 701401, Taiwan.
    Pakpour, Amir H.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Department of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, The Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare.
    Worldwide Estimation of Parental Acceptance of COVID-19 Vaccine for Their Children: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis2023In: Vaccines, E-ISSN 2076-393X, Vol. 11, no 3, article id 533Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Currently, the best method to well control the spread of COVID-19 without severe mental health problems is to reach herd immunity. Therefore, the vaccination rate of the COVID-19 vaccine is critical. Among the populations, children are the vulnerable ones to get vaccinated; therefore, it is important to assess parents’ and guardians’ willingness to have their children vaccinated. The present systematic review and meta-analysis synthesized evidence to estimate the parents’ acceptance rate of COVID-19 vaccination toward their children. Additionally, factors explaining the acceptance rate were investigated. Four academic databases (PubMed, Scopus, Web of Science, and ProQuest) together with Google Scholar were searched, and the references of the included publications were searched as well. Using the PECO-S framework (population, exposure, comparison, outcome, and study design), observational studies of cross-sectional, cohort, or case-control studies were included. The outcome was parents’ or guardians’ willingness to let their children be vaccinated. The studies included in the present review were restricted to English and peer-reviewed papers published between December 2019 and July 2022. A total of 98 papers across 69 different countries with 413,590 participants were included. The mean age of the parents was 39.10 (range: 18–70) years and that of their children was 8.45 (range: 0–18) years. The pooled estimated prevalence of parental acceptance to vaccinate their children with the COVID-19 vaccine was 57% (98 studies, 95% CI: 52–62%, I2: 99.92%, τ2: 0.06). Moreover, data collection time was a significant factor explaining parental willingness in the multivariable meta-regression, with a 13% decrease in parental willingness by each month increase in time, explaining 11.44% of variance. Qualitative synthesis results showed that parents’ COVID-19 vaccine knowledge, trust in theCOVID-19 vaccine, and facilitators in vaccination (e.g., low cost, good vaccine accessibility, and government incentive) were significant factors for higher willingness, while mental health problems (e.g., having worries and psychological distress) were significant factors for lower willingness. Given that the acceptance rate was relatively low (57%) and does not achieve the requirement of herd immunity (i.e., 70%), governments and healthcare authorities should try to elevate parents’ knowledge and trust in the COVID-19 vaccine, facilitate in vaccination, and reduce their mental difficulties to improve the overall vaccination rate among children.

  • 23.
    Alimoradi, Z.
    et al.
    Social Determinants of Health Research Center, Research Institute for Prevention of Non-Communicable Diseases, Qazvin University of Medical Sciences, Qazvin, 3419759811, Iran.
    Majd, N. R.
    Social Determinants of Health Research Center, Research Institute for Prevention of Non-Communicable Diseases, Qazvin University of Medical Sciences, Qazvin, 3419759811, Iran.
    Broström, Anders
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dept. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT.
    Tsang, H. W. H.
    Department of Rehabilitation Sciences, Faculty of Health and Social Sciences, Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hung Hom, Hong Kong.
    Singh, P.
    P. G. Department of Agriculture, Khalsa College Amritsar, Punjab, India.
    Ohayon, M. M.
    Stanford Sleep Epidemiology Research Center (SSERC), School of Medicine, Stanford University, CA, United State.
    Lin, C. -Y
    Institute of Allied Health Sciences, College of Medicine, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan, Taiwan.
    Pakpour, Amir H.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dept. of Nursing Science.
    Is alexithymia associated with sleep problems?: A systematic review and meta-analysis2022In: Neuroscience and Biobehavioral Reviews, ISSN 0149-7634, E-ISSN 1873-7528, Vol. 133, article id 104513Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Alexithymia, a difficulty identifying and expressing emotions experienced by oneself or others, measurably harms quality of sleep. Research has observed the association between alexithymia and sleep problems; however, the cumulative effect of this association is still unknown. Therefore, this systematic review and meta-analysis was conducted to present scientific evidence regarding the relationship between alexithymia and sleep quality. Adhering to the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) guideline, and using relevant keywords, we searched six databases: Scopus, PubMed Central, ProQuest, ISI Web of Knowledge, EMBASE, and Science Direct. We selected observational studies on the association between alexithymia and sleep. We conducted meta-analysis using a random-effect model to calculate the effect size (ES) with Fisher's z transformation. Eligible studies (N = 26) in 24 papers included 7546 participants from 12 countries. The entire ES for the association between alexithymia and sleep was 0.44 (95 % CI: 0.31, 0.56). Additionally, patient populations had a larger ES (ES = 0.55; 95 % CI: 0.30, 0.79) than healthy populations (ES = 0.30; 95 % CI: 0.20, 0.41). The results of the present systematic review and meta-analysis revealed a significant association between alexithymia and sleep problems, especially among people with any medical condition.

  • 24.
    Alimoradi, Z.
    et al.
    Social Determinants of Health Research Center, Research Institute for Prevention of Non-Communicable Diseases, Qazvin University of Medical Sciences, Qazvin, Iran.
    Majd, N. R.
    Social Determinants of Health Research Center, Research Institute for Prevention of Non-Communicable Diseases, Qazvin University of Medical Sciences, Qazvin, Iran.
    RezaeiNiaraki, M.
    Social Determinants of Health Research Center, Research Institute for Prevention of Non-Communicable Diseases, Qazvin University of Medical Sciences, Qazvin, Iran.
    Bajalan, Z.
    Social Determinants of Health Research Center, Research Institute for Prevention of Non-Communicable Diseases, Qazvin University of Medical Sciences, Qazvin, Iran.
    Griffiths, M. D.
    International Gaming Research Unit, Psychology Department, Nottingham Trent University, Nottingham, United Kingdom.
    Pakpour, Amir H.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dept. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, The Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare.
    Prevalence of household food insecurity and its predictive role on the health of mothers with children aged under 60 months2022In: Clinical Nutrition ESPEN, E-ISSN 2405-4577, Vol. 51, p. 246-252Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Food insecurity can have poor physical and mental health consequences for all family members. The present study investigated the prevalence of household food insecurity and its predictive role on the health of mothers of children aged under 60 months in Qazvin (Iran). Methods: A cross-sectional study was carried out between January 2019 and December 2020. Participants included all mothers with children aged under 60 months who referred themselves to comprehensive health centers in Qazvin (N = 1750; mean age 30.61 years). Convenience sampling was performed. Data were collected using a demographic information checklist, the General Health Questionnaire (GHQ) and the Household Food Insecurity Access Scale (HFIAS). Data analysis was performed using independent t-tests, one-way analyses of variance, uni-variable and multivariable linear regression with a significance level of p < 0.05. Results: Two-thirds of the participants had a secure food status (68.4%). Household food security status showed a significant, and inverse relationship with general health subscales. General health subscales of depression (standardized mean difference or SMD: −1.24 [95% CI: −1.36; −1.13]), somatic symptoms (SMD: −0.92 [95% CI: −1.03; −0.81]) and anxiety and insomnia (SMD: −0.72 [95% CI: −0.83; −0.61]) were significantly lower among food secure participants vs. food insecure participants. Social dysfunction was not significantly associated with household food security. The regression models demonstrated that household food security was a significant predictor for the health of mothers with children aged under 60 months: uni-variable (β = −0.38) and multivariable (β = −0.41). Conclusion: Household food security is associated with various aspects of mothers’ health. Since the growth and development of a healthy child depends on having a healthy mother, the food security situation of the family and the general health of mother can be assessed as part of providing health service regarding monitoring growth and development of children. This will help in targeting appropriate interventions if needed.

  • 25.
    Alimoradi, Zainab
    et al.
    Social Determinants of Health Research Center, Research Institute for Prevention of Non-Communicable Diseases, Qazvin University of Medical Sciences, Qazvin, Iran.
    Abdi, Fatemeh
    School of Nursing and Midwifery, Alborz University of Medical Sciences, Karaj, Iran.
    Gozal, David
    Department of Child Health and Child Health Research Institute, University of Missouri, Columbia, Missouri, USA.
    Pakpour, Amir H.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dept. of Nursing Science.
    Estimation of sleep problems among pregnant women during COVID-19 pandemic: a systematic review and meta-analysis2022In: BMJ Open, E-ISSN 2044-6055, Vol. 12, no 4, article id e056044Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: To estimate the sleep problems among pregnant women during the COVID-19 pandemic.

    ELIGIBILITY CRITERIA: English, peer-reviewed, observational studies published between December 2019 and July 2021 which assessed and reported sleep problem prevalence using a valid and reliable measure were included.

    INFORMATION SOURCES: Scopus, Medline/PubMed Central, ProQuest, ISI Web of Knowledge and Embase.

    RISK OF BIAS ASSESSMENT TOOL: The Newcastle-Ottawa Scale checklist.

    SYNTHESIS OF RESULTS: Prevalence of sleep problems was synthesised using STATA software V.14 using a random effects model. To assess moderator analysis, meta-regression was carried out. Funnel plot and Egger's test were used to assess publication bias. Meta-trim was used to correct probable publication bias. The jackknife method was used for sensitivity analysis.

    INCLUDED STUDIES: A total of seven cross-sectional studies with 2808 participants from four countries were included.

    SYNTHESIS OF RESULTS: The pooled estimated prevalence of sleep problems was 56% (95% CI 23% to 88%, I2=99.81%, Tau2=0.19). Due to the probability of publication bias, the fill-and-trim method was used to correct the estimated pooled measure, which imputed four studies. The corrected results based on this method showed that pooled prevalence of sleep problems was 13% (95% CI 0% to 45%; p<0.001). Based on meta-regression, age was the only significant predictor of prevalence of sleep problems among pregnant women.

    LIMITATIONS OF EVIDENCE: All studies were cross-sectional absence of assessment of sleep problems prior to COVID-19, and the outcomes of the pregnancies among those with and without sleep problems in a consistent manner are among the limitation of the current review.

    INTERPRETATION: Pregnant women have experienced significant declines in sleep quality when faced with the COVID-19 pandemic. The short-term and long-term implications of such alterations in sleep on gestational and offspring outcomes are unclear and warrant further studies.

    PROSPERO REGISTRATION NUMBER: CRD42020181644.

  • 26.
    Alimoradi, Zainab
    et al.
    Social Determinants of Health Research Center, Research Institute for Prevention of Non-Communicable Diseases, Qazvin University of Medical Sciences, Qazvin, Iran.
    Broström, Anders
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Department of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT. Department of Clinical Neurophysiology, Linköping University Hospital, Linköping, Sweden.
    Tsang, Hector W. H.
    Department of Rehabilitation Sciences, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hung Hom, Hong Kong.
    Griffiths, Mark D.
    International Gaming Research Unit, Psychology Department, Nottingham Trent University, Nottingham, UK.
    Haghayegh, Shahab
    Department of Biostatistics, Harvard T. H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts, USA.
    Ohayon, Maurice M.
    Stanford Sleep Epidemiology Research Center (SSERC), School of Medicine, Stanford University, CA, USA.
    Lin, Chung-Ying
    Institute of Allied Health Sciences, College of Medicine, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan, Taiwan.
    Pakpour, Amir H.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Department of Nursing Science. Social Determinants of Health Research Center, Research Institute for Prevention of Non-Communicable Diseases, Qazvin University of Medical Sciences, Qazvin, Iran.
    Sleep problems during COVID-19 pandemic and its’ association to psychological distress: A systematic review and meta-analysis2021In: eClinicalMedicine, E-ISSN 2589-5370, Vol. 36, article id 100916Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The emerging novel coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has become one of the leading cause of deaths worldwide in 2020. The present systematic review and meta-analysis estimated the magnitude of sleep problems during the COVID-19 pandemic and its relationship with psychological distress.

    Methods: Five academic databases (Scopus, PubMed Central, ProQuest, ISI Web of Knowledge, and Embase) were searched. Observational studies including case-control studies and cross-sectional studies were included if relevant data relationships were reported (i.e., sleep assessed utilizing the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index or Insomnia Severity Index). All the studies were English, peer-reviewed papers published between December 2019 and February 2021. PROSPERO registration number: CRD42020181644.

    Findings: 168 cross-sectional, four case-control, and five longitudinal design papers comprising 345,270 participants from 39 countries were identified. The corrected pooled estimated prevalence of sleep problems were 31% among healthcare professionals, 18% among the general population, and 57% among COVID-19 patients (all p-values < 0.05). Sleep problems were associated with depression among healthcare professionals, the general population, and COVID-19 patients, with Fisher's Z scores of -0.28, -0.30, and -0.36, respectively. Sleep problems were positively (and moderately) associated with anxiety among healthcare professionals, the general population, and COVID-19 patients, with Fisher's z scores of 0.55, 0.48, and 0.49, respectively.

    Interpretation: Sleep problems appear to have been common during the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic. Moreover, sleep problems were found to be associated with higher levels of psychological distress. With the use of effective programs treating sleep problems, psychological distress may be reduced. Vice versa, the use of effective programs treating psychological distress, sleep problems may be reduced.

  • 27.
    Alimoradi, Zainab
    et al.
    Qazvin Univ Med Sci, Res Inst Prevent Noncommunicable Dis, Social Determinants Hlth Res Ctr, Qazvin, Iran..
    Lin, Chung-Ying
    Natl Cheng Kung Univ, Inst Allied Hlth Sci, Coll Med, Tainan, Taiwan.;Natl Cheng Kung Univ, Natl Cheng Kung Univ Hosp, Coll Med, Biostat Consulting Ctr, Tainan, Taiwan.;Natl Cheng Kung Univ, Dept Publ Hlth, Coll Med, Tainan, Taiwan.;Natl Cheng Kung Univ, Dept Occupat Therapy, Coll Med, Tainan, Taiwan..
    Ullah, Irfan
    Gandhara Univ, Kabir Med Coll, Peshawar, Pakistan..
    Griffiths, Mark
    Nottingham Trent Univ, Dept Psychol, Int Gaming Res Unit, Nottingham, England..
    Pakpour, Amir H.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Department of Nursing Science.
    Item Response Theory Analysis of the Fear of COVID-19 Scale (FCV-19S): A Systematic Review2022In: Psychology Research and Behavior Management, E-ISSN 1179-1578, Vol. 15, p. 581-596Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The COVID-19 pandemic is still ongoing and is not yet under control. Evidence regarding the impacts of COVID-19 on psychological distress has been widely reported worldwide, and one of the primary concerns regarding psychological distress is fear (ie, fear of COVID-19). Therefore, having a robust instrument for assessing fear of COVID-19 is important. The present systematic review aimed to synthesize the psychometric evidence evaluated using item response theory (IRT) on the Fear of COVID-19 Scale (FCV-19S). Methods: Utilizing the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) guidelines, four academic databases (Scopus, PubMed Central, ProQuest, and ISI Web of Knowledge) were used to search target papers. Keywords used for search were "Fear of COVID-19 Scale" and its abbreviation (ie, "FCV-19S") and IRT-related terms. The COnsensus-based Standards for the selection of health status Measurement INstruments (COSMIN) checklist was then applied to evaluate the methodological quality of the reviewed papers. Moreover, psychometric properties using IRT methods were synthesized using a qualitative method. Results: The initial search resulted in 552 papers (73 duplicates) and 479 were screened based on their titles and abstracts. Finally, 16 papers were included for review regarding their methodological quality (via COSMIN) to synthesize the psychometric evidence for FCV-19S. The 16 papers included 21 countries with 16 language versions of FCV-19S. Conclusion: All the psychometric evidence indicated that the seven items in the FCV-19S fit with the concept of fear. The FCV-19S is a strong and valid instrument for assessing fear across different languages. The seven items in the FCV-19S appear to be unidimensional in assessing fear, which indicates that all items are necessary in the FCV-19S.

  • 28.
    Alimoradi, Zainab
    et al.
    Qazvin Univ Med Sci, Social Determinants Hlth Res Ctr, Res Inst Prevent Noncommunicable Dis, Qazvin, Iran..
    Ohayon, Maurice M.
    Stanford Univ, Stanford Sleep Epidemiol Res Ctr SSERC, Sch Med, Stanford, CA 94305 USA..
    Griffiths, Mark D.
    Nottingham Trent Univ, Dept Psychol, Int Gaming Res Unit, Nottingham, England..
    Lin, Chung-Ying
    Natl Cheng Kung Univ, Coll Med, Inst Allied Hlth Sci, Tainan, Taiwan.;Natl Cheng Kung Univ, Coll Med, Natl Cheng Kung Univ Hosp, Biostat Consulting Ctr, Tainan, Taiwan.;Natl Cheng Kung Univ, Coll Med, Dept Publ Hlth, Tainan, Taiwan.;Natl Cheng Kung Univ, Coll Med, Dept Occupat Therapy, Tainan, Taiwan..
    Pakpour, Amir H.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dept. of Nursing Science. Qazvin Univ Med Sci, Social Determinants Hlth Res Ctr, Res Inst Prevent Noncommunicable Dis, Qazvin, Iran..
    Fear of COVID-19 and its association with mental health-related factors: systematic review and meta-analysis2022In: BJPsych Open, E-ISSN 2056-4724, Vol. 8, no 2, article id e73Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background The severity of COVID-19 remains high worldwide. Therefore, millions of individuals are likely to suffer from fear of COVID-19 and related mental health factors. Aims The present systematic review and meta-analysis aimed to synthesize empirical evidence to understand fear of COVID-19 and its associations with mental health-related problems during this pandemic period. Method Relevant studies were searched for on five databases (Scopus, ProQuest, EMBASE, PubMed Central, and ISI Web of Knowledge), using relevant terms (COVID-19-related fear, anxiety, depression, mental health-related factors, mental well-being and sleep problems). All studies were included for analyses irrespective of their methodological quality, and the impact of quality on pooled effect size was examined by subgroup analysis. Results The meta-analysis pooled data from 91 studies comprising 88 320 participants (mean age 38.88 years; 60.66% females) from 36 countries. The pooled estimated mean of fear of COVID-19 was 13.11 (out of 35), using the Fear of COVID-19 Scale. The associations between fear of COVID-19 and mental health-related factors were mostly moderate (Fisher's z = 0.56 for mental health-related factors; 0.54 for anxiety; 0.42 for stress; 0.40 for depression; 0.29 for sleep problems and -0.24 for mental well-being). Methodological quality did not affect these associations. Conclusions Fear of COVID-19 has associations with various mental health-related factors. Therefore, programmes for reducing fear of COVID-19 and improving mental health are needed.

  • 29.
    Alimoradi, Zainab
    et al.
    Social Determinants of Health Research Center, Research Institute for Prevention of Non-Communicable Diseases, Qazvin University of Medical Sciences, Qazvin, Iran.
    Sallam, Malik
    Department of Pathology, Microbiology and Forensic Medicine, School of Medicine, The University of Jordan, Amman, Jordan; Department of Clinical Laboratories and Forensic Medicine, Jordan University Hospital, Amman, Jordan; Department of Translational Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Lund University, Malmö, Sweden.
    Jafari, Elahe
    Social Determinants of Health Research Center, Research Institute for Prevention of Non-Communicable Diseases, Qazvin University of Medical Sciences, Qazvin, Iran.
    Potenza, Marc N.
    Departments of Psychiatry and Neuroscience and the Child Study Center and Wu Tsai Institute, Yale School of Medicine / Yale University, New Haven, CT, USA; Connecticut Mental Health Center, New Haven, CT, USA; Connecticut Council on Problem Gambling, Wethersfield, CT, USA.
    Pakpour, Amir H.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Department of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, The Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare. Social Determinants of Health Research Center, Research Institute for Prevention of Non-Communicable Diseases, Qazvin University of Medical Sciences, Qazvin, Iran.
    Prevalence of COVID-19 vaccine acceptance among migrant and refugee groups: A systematic review and meta-analysis2023In: Vaccine: X, ISSN 2590-1362, Vol. 14, article id 100308Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVES: Understanding COVID-19 vaccine hesitancy among migrant and refugee groups is critical for achieving vaccine equity. Therefore, we aimed to estimate the prevalence of COVID-19 vaccine acceptance among migrant and refugee populations.

    METHODS: A systematic review (PROSPERO: CRD42022333337) was conducted (December 2019-July 2022) using PubMed, Scopus, Web of Science, ProQuest and Google Scholar.

    RESULTS: Nineteen studies from 12 countries were included. The pooled estimated prevalence of COVID-19 vaccine willingness among migrant and refugee groups was 70% (19 studies, 95% CI: 62.3-77.4%, I2: 99.19%, τ2: 0.03). Female and male participants did not differ significantly with each other (p = 0.64). Although no individual variable contributed statistically significantly in multivariable meta-regression analysis, the multivariable model that considered methodological quality, mean age of participants, participant group and country of origin explained 67% of variance.

    DISCUSSION: Proportions of migrant/refugee groups receiving COVID-19 vaccinations approximated those observed among general populations. Additional studies are needed to examine factors relating to vaccine willingness to identify the most significant factors that may be targeted in interventions.

  • 30.
    Allgurin, Monika
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dept. of Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ARN-J (Aging Research Network - Jönköping). Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. SALVE (Social challenges, Actors, Living conditions, reseach VEnue).
    Enell, Sofia
    Faculty of Social Science, Department of Social Work, Linnaeus University, Växjö, Sweden.
    Battling parenting: The consequences of secure care interventions on parents2023In: Child & Family Social Work, ISSN 1356-7500, E-ISSN 1365-2206, Vol. 28, no 1, p. 108-116Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Secure care in Sweden is the most intrusive child welfare intervention, and children and their family members have restricted contact. For each child in secure care, there are at least twice as many affected family members and parents who must manage the consequences of this institutionalization. Clearly, it is just as important to understand how secure care affects parents as it is to understand how secure care affects children. To address this issue, we conducted in-depth interviews with 11 parents to eight children who had been placed in secure care during their childhood, focusing on the institutional and societal structures that affected these parents and their parenting. With a narrative approach, stories alluding to a metaphor of war are identified. These stories reveal how all parents (but especially single mothers) are affected by their diverse socio-economic positions and the rigid frames of family life presumed by child welfare interventions. In these narratives, parenting emerges as a social practice rather than a skill. Above all, the stories demonstrate a great deal of vulnerability and sensitivity of parenting. The findings raise critical questions about the meaning and overarching consequences of institutional interventions in a family life. 

  • 31.
    Al-Mamun, F.
    et al.
    CHINTA Research Bangladesh, Savar, Dhaka, Bangladesh.
    Hussain, N.
    CHINTA Research Bangladesh, Savar, Dhaka, Bangladesh.
    Sakib, N.
    Department of Microbiology, Jashore University of Science and Technology, Jashore, Bangladesh.
    Hosen, I.
    CHINTA Research Bangladesh, Savar, Dhaka, Bangladesh.
    Rayhan, I.
    Department of Economics, Jahangirnagar University, Savar, Dhaka, Bangladesh.
    Abdullah, A. H.
    CHINTA Research Bangladesh, Savar, Dhaka, Bangladesh.
    Bhuiyan, A. K. M. I.
    CHINTA Research Bangladesh, Savar, Dhaka, Bangladesh.
    Sarker, M. A.
    CHINTA Research Bangladesh, Savar, Dhaka, Bangladesh.
    Hossain, S.
    Department of Public Health and Informatics, Jahangirnagar University, Savar, Dhaka, Bangladesh.
    Zou, L.
    Body-Brain-Mind Laboratory, School of Psychology, Shenzhen University, Shenzhen, China.
    Manzar, M. D.
    Department of Nursing, College of Applied Medical Sciences, Majmaah University, Al Majma’ah, Saudi Arabia.
    Lin, C. -Y
    Institute of Allied Health Sciences, College of Medicine, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan, Taiwan.
    Sikder, M. T.
    Department of Public Health and Informatics, Jahangirnagar University, Savar, Dhaka, Bangladesh.
    Muhit, M.
    Department of Public Health, University of South Asia, Dhaka, Bangladesh.
    Pakpour, Amir H.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Department of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, The Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare.
    Gozal, D.
    Department of Child Health and The Child Health Research Institute, The University of Missouri School of Medicine, Columbia, MO, United States.
    Griffiths, M. D.
    International Gaming Research Unit, Psychology Department, Nottingham Trent University, Nottingham, United Kingdom.
    Mamun, M. A.
    CHINTA Research Bangladesh, Savar, Dhaka, Bangladesh.
    Sleep duration during the COVID-19 pandemic in Bangladesh: A GIS-based large sample survey study2023In: Scientific Reports, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 13, no 1, article id 3368Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Although several studies have been conducted in Bangladesh regarding sleep problems during the COVID-19 pandemic, none have utilized a large nationwide sample or presented their findings based on nationwide geographical distribution. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to explore the total sleep duration, night-time sleep, and daily naptime and their associated factors as well as geographic information system (GIS) distribution. A cross-sectional survey was carried out among 9730 people in April 2020, including questions relating to socio-demographic variables, behavioral and health factors, lockdown, depression, suicidal ideation, night sleep duration, and naptime duration. Descriptive and inferential statistics, both linear and multivariate regression, and spatial distribution were performed using Microsoft Excel, SPSS, Stata, and ArcGIS software. The results indicated that 64.7% reported sleeping 7–9 h a night, while 29.6% slept less than 7 h nightly, and 5.7% slept more than 9 h nightly. 43.7% reported 30–60 min of daily nap duration, whereas 20.9% napped for more than 1 h daily. Significant predictors of total daily sleep duration were being aged 18–25 years, being unemployed, being married, self-isolating 4 days or more, economic hardship, and depression. For nap duration, being aged 18–25 years, retired, a smoker, and a social media user were at relatively higher risk. The GIS distribution showed that regional division areas with high COVID-19 exposure had higher rates of non-normal sleep duration. Sleep duration showed a regional heterogeneity across the regional divisions of the country that exhibited significant associations with a multitude of socioeconomic and health factors.

  • 32.
    Alwehammar, Caroline
    et al.
    Jönköping University.
    Eriksson, Monica
    Jönköping University.
    Gymnasieungdomars kunskap om tobaks påverkan på oral hälsa: En enkätstudie2021Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Studies have shown negative effects on general and oral health in tobacco use. Adolescents tobacco onset usually occurs between the ages of 14 and 16. Differences in knowledge among adolescents geographically have been conducted in Sweden. Advice from dental staff regarding how tobacco affects oral health increases the number of the people quitting smoking and snuff. Aim: To investigate whether there were differences in knowledge among Swedish High School students in year two regarding how tobacco affects oral health depending on whether they go to school in urban or rural areas. Method: A quantitative approach was conducted through a web-based survey with closed questions. Two different Senior High Schools with 110 adolescents studying year two participated. Results: High School students have good knowledge of how tobacco affects oral health. Individual questions showed low knowledge regarding the effects of the hookah on oral health in both Senior High Schools. Conclusion: Education from dentistry about the effects of the hookah on oral health should be implemented in school education. More studies in this subject should be conducted to map differences in knowledge.

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  • 33.
    An, Jing
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication.
    Participation in Outside Home Activities in China: A comparison of Typically Developing Children and Children with Developmental Disabilities2021Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Background: There are personal factors and environmental factors playing impacts on the participation of children with developmental disabilities in China. Aim: The aim of this study is to investigate the participation of children with developmental disabilities in outside home activities compared to typically developing children. Method: A quantitative cross-sectional method was used in this study. Participants were children with developmental disabilities (autism spectrum disorder and intellectual disabilities) and typically developing children between the age of 5 to 13. An instrument called ‘Picture My Participation’ (Simplified Chinese version) was used for data collection. Results: In general, typically developing children attended more frequently and felt more involved than children with developmental disabilities in outside home activities. There were many similarities in attendance between the two groups of children. They both attended more frequently in formal learning at school, shopping and playing with others, and less frequently in spiritual activities, social activities, and trips. Some differences were found in the activities with lower levels of involvement. Apart from the spiritual activity with the lowest mean score of involvement in both groups, typically developing children felt less involved in organized leisure and trips. However, children with developmental disabilities had lower levels of involvement in health center visits and social activities. There was no significant association between age, gender, place of residence, and participation in neither the attendance nor involvement aspect. Conclusion: Both intrinsic and extrinsic factors play essential parts in the participation of children with developmental disabilities. More support should be provided to children with DD.

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    fulltext
  • 34. Andel, Ross
    et al.
    Silverstein, Merril
    Kåreholt, Ingemar
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology.
    Occupational and Leisure Time Engagement at Midlife and Cognitive Functioning in Advanced Old Age2012In: The 21st Nordic Congress of Gerontology, Dilemmas in Ageing Societies, Abstracts and Program, Copenhagen, Denmark, June 10th - 13th, 2012, 2012Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 35. Anderzén Carlsson, Agneta
    et al.
    Wahlqvist, Moa
    Björk, Maria
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Huus, Karina
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Health and family climate in families where one parent has deafblindness2019Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 36. Anderzén Carlsson, Agneta
    et al.
    Wahlqvist, Moa
    Huus, Karina
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Björk, Maria
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    The experience of family life when one parent has deafblindness - From the perspective of the partner2019Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 37. Anderzén Carlsson, Agneta
    et al.
    Wahlqvist, Moa
    Huus, Karina
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Björk, Maria
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    The lived experience of family life when one parent has deafblindness - from the perspective of the partner2019Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 38.
    Annear, Michael
    et al.
    Waseda University, Tokyo, Japan.
    Fristedt, Sofi
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Department for Quality Improvement and Leadership. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, The Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ARN-J (Aging Research Network - Jönköping).
    Fischl, Caroline
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Department of Rehabilitation. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ARN-J (Aging Research Network - Jönköping).
    Fischl, Géza
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Construction Engineering and Lighting Science.
    Laddawong, T.
    Chiba, M.
    Healthy and active ageing in place in urban Japan and Sweden – A MIRAI seed funding project2022Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 39.
    Arcuri, R.
    et al.
    Oswaldo Cruz Foundation – FIOCRUZ. Av. Brasil, 4036/10° Andar, Prédio da Expansão, Manguinhos, Rio de Janeiro, 21040-361, Brazil.
    Bellas, H. C.
    Oswaldo Cruz Foundation – FIOCRUZ. Av. Brasil, 4036/10° Andar, Prédio da Expansão, Manguinhos, Rio de Janeiro, 21040-361, Brazil.
    Ferreira, D. D. S.
    Production Engineering Program, Federal University of Rio de Janeiro – COPPE/UFRJ. Av. Horácio Macedo, 2030 - Bloco G - Sala 207 - Centro de Tecnologia, Cidade Universitária - Ilha do Fundão, Rio de Janeiro, 21941-914, Brazil.
    Bulhões, B.
    Oswaldo Cruz Foundation – FIOCRUZ. Av. Brasil, 4036/10° Andar, Prédio da Expansão, Manguinhos, Rio de Janeiro, 21040-361, Brazil.
    Vidal, M. C. R.
    Production Engineering Program, Federal University of Rio de Janeiro – COPPE/UFRJ. Av. Horácio Macedo, 2030 - Bloco G - Sala 207 - Centro de Tecnologia, Cidade Universitária - Ilha do Fundão, Rio de Janeiro, 21941-914, Brazil.
    Carvalho, P. V. R. D.
    Nuclear Engineering Institute – IEN/CNEN. R. Hélio de Almeida, 75, Cidade Universitária - Ilha do Fundão, Rio de Janeiro, 21941-614, Brazil.
    Jatobá, A.
    Oswaldo Cruz Foundation – FIOCRUZ. Av. Brasil, 4036/10° Andar, Prédio da Expansão, Manguinhos, Rio de Janeiro, 21040-361, Brazil.
    Hollnagel, Erik
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, The Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare.
    On the brink of disruption: Applying Resilience Engineering to anticipate system performance under crisis2022In: Applied Ergonomics, ISSN 0003-6870, E-ISSN 1872-9126, Vol. 99, article id 103632Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    As COVID-19 spread across Brazil, it quickly reached remote regions including Amazon's ultra-peripheral locations where patient transportation through rivers is added to the list of obstacles to overcome. This article analyses the pandemic's effects in the access of riverine communities to the prehospital emergency healthcare system in the Brazilian Upper Amazon River region. To do so, we present two studies that by using a Resilience Engineering approach aimed to predict the functioning of the Brazilian Mobile Emergency Medical Service (SAMU) for riverside and coastal areas during the COVID-19 pandemic, based on the normal system functioning. Study I, carried out before the pandemic, applied ethnographic methods for data collection and the Functional Resonance Analysis Method - FRAM for data analysis in order to develop a model of the mobile emergency care in the region during typical conditions of operation. Study II then estimated how changes in variability dynamics would alter system functioning during the pandemic, arriving at three trends that could lead the service to collapse. Finally, the accuracy of predictions is discussed after the pandemic first peaked in the region. Findings reveal that relatively small changes in variability dynamics can deliver strong implications to operating care and safety of expeditions aboard water ambulances. Also, important elements that add to the resilient capabilities of the system are extra-organizational, and thus during the pandemic safety became jeopardized as informal support networks grew fragile. Using FRAM for modelling regular operation enabled prospective scenario analysis that accurately predicted disruptions in providing emergency care to riverine population.

  • 40.
    Areskoug Josefsson, Kristina
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, The Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. IMPROVE (Improvement, innovation, and leadership in health and welfare).
    Digitala vårdmöten möter användarnas behov [bloggpost]2019Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 41.
    Areskoug Josefsson, Kristina
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, The Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. IMPROVE (Improvement, innovation, and leadership in health and welfare).
    Konsten att veta om frågan ger svaret på frågan [bloggpost]2019Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 42.
    Areskoug Josefsson, Kristina
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, The Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. IMPROVE (Improvement, innovation, and leadership in health and welfare).
    Samskapande av sexuell hälsa vid kronisk sjukdom [bloggpost]2020Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 43.
    Areskoug Josefsson, Kristina
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, The Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. IMPROVE (Improvement, innovation, and leadership in health and welfare).
    Sex och samlevnad vid reumatisk sjukdom2019Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 44.
    Areskoug Josefsson, Kristina
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, The Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. IMPROVE (Improvement, innovation, and leadership in health and welfare).
    Sexuell hälsa2018In: Hälsa för barn och unga med flerfunktionsnedsättning / [ed] Birgitta Nordström, Kalmar: Nationellt kompetenscentrum anhöriga , 2018, p. 53-64Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    För personer med svår funktionsnedsättning kan det finnas både fysiska och kognitiva hinder som försvårar möjligheten att uppnå eller säkerställa god sexuell hälsa. Kristina Areskoug-Josefsson är fysioterapeut och forskar kring sexuell hälsa hos personer med kronisk sjukdom. Här svarar hon på frågor om vad god sexuell hälsa kan innebära för unga med flerfunktionsnedsättning.

  • 45.
    Areskoug Josefsson, Kristina
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, The Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. IMPROVE (Improvement, innovation, and leadership in health and welfare).
    Sexuell hälsa för alla – fysioterapeutens roll2019In: Fysioterapi, ISSN 1653-5804, no 1, p. 36-41Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Fysioterapeuter har en viktig roll i att främja sexuell hälsa genom helhetssyn på hälsa och livskvalitet. Befintlig forskning visar på fysioterapeuters betydelsefulla roll, samtidigt som det finns brister i kompetens och utbildning.

  • 46.
    Areskoug Josefsson, Kristina
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, The Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. IMPROVE (Improvement, innovation, and leadership in health and welfare).
    Utbildning i förbättringsarbete och förbättringsledarskap förbättrar hälsa och välfärd! [bloggpost]2020Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 47.
    Areskoug Josefsson, Kristina
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, The Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. IMPROVE (Improvement, innovation, and leadership in health and welfare).
    Where to begin: Reflections on co-production from a service-user and a researcher’s perspective [blog post]2020Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 48.
    Areskoug Josefsson, Kristina
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, The Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. IMPROVE (Improvement, innovation, and leadership in health and welfare).
    Äntligen sex i fokus! [bloggpost]2019Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 49.
    Areskoug Josefsson, Kristina
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, The Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. IMPROVE (Improvement, innovation, and leadership in health and welfare).
    Balogh, Stefan
    Jutterdal, Stefan
    Kåhlin, Ida
    Rasmusson, Else-Marie
    Danemalm Jägervall, Carina
    Hälso- och sjukvården måste sätta sexuell rehabilitering på kartan2019In: Dagens MedicinArticle in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 50.
    Areskoug Josefsson, Kristina
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, The Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. IMPROVE (Improvement, innovation, and leadership in health and welfare).
    Gerbild, Helle
    University College Lillabaelt, Odense, Danmark & Aalborgs Universitet, Aalborg, Danmark.
    Prata om sexuell hälsa som fysioterapeut - Varför och hur?2019Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [sv]

    Under workshopen får deltagarna träna i att kommunicera om sexuell hälsa, reflektera över etiska och praktiska perspektiv på samtalet, samt få kunskap om behovet av att kunna prata om sexuell hälsa som fysioterapeut, liksom förståelse av vikten av att inkludera sexuell hälsa i rehabilitering.

1234567 1 - 50 of 459
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