Change search
Refine search result
12 1 - 50 of 68
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1. Adair, B
    et al.
    Ullenhag, A.
    Rosenbaum, P.
    Granlund, Mats
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Behavioural Science and Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Biomedical Platform.
    Keen, D.
    Imms, C.
    A systematic review of measures used to quantify participation in childhood disability and of their alignment with the family of Participation-Related ConstructsIn: Developmental Medicine & Child Neurology, ISSN 0012-1622, E-ISSN 1469-8749Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 2.
    Adair, Brooke
    et al.
    School of Allied Health, Australian Catholic University, Fitzroy, Vic., Australia.
    Ullenhag, Anna
    Department of Women's and Children's Health, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Keen, Deb
    Autism Centre of Excellence, Griffith University, Mt Gravatt, Qld, Australia.
    Granlund, Mats
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Behavioural Science and Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Imms, Christine
    School of Allied Health, Australian Catholic University, Fitzroy, Vic., Australia.
    The effect of interventions aimed at improving participation outcomes for children with disabilities: a systematic review2015In: Developmental Medicine & Child Neurology, ISSN 0012-1622, E-ISSN 1469-8749, Vol. 57, no 12, p. 1093-1104Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim

    Enhancement of participation has been described as the ultimate outcome for health and educational interventions. The goal of this systematic review was to identify and critically appraise studies that aimed to improve the participation outcomes of children with disabilities.

    Method

    Nine databases that index literature from the fields of health, psychology, and education were searched to retrieve information on research conducted with children with disabilities aged between 5 years and 18 years. Articles were included if the author(s) reported that participation was an intended outcome of the intervention. The articles included were limited to those reporting high-level primary research, as defined by Australia's National Health and Medical Research Council evidence hierarchy guidelines. No restrictions were placed on the type of intervention being investigated.

    Results

    Seven randomized controlled or pseudo-randomized studies were included. Only three of these studies identified participation as a primary outcome. Both individualized and group-based approaches to enhancing participation outcomes appeared to be effective. Studies of interventions with a primary focus on body function or activity level outcomes did not demonstrate an effect on participation outcomes.

    Intepretation

    Few intervention studies have focused on participation as a primary outcome measure. Approaches using individually tailored education and mentoring programmes were found to enhance participation outcomes, while exercise programmes, where participation was a secondary outcome, generally demonstrated little effect.

  • 3.
    Almberg, Maria
    et al.
    Mobility Centre Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Selander, Helena
    Mobility Centre Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Falkmer, Marita
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD. School of Occupational Therapy and Social Work, Faculty of Health Sciences, Curtin University, Perth, Australia.
    Vaz, Sharmila
    School of Occupational Therapy and Social Work, Faculty of Health Sciences, Curtin University, Perth, Australia.
    Ciccarelli, Marina
    School of Occupational Therapy and Social Work, Faculty of Health Sciences, Curtin University, Perth, Australia.
    Falkmer, Torbjörn
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. School of Occupational Therapy and Social Work, Faculty of Health Sciences, Curtin University, Perth, Australia.
    Experiences of facilitators or barriers in driving education from learner and novice drivers with ADHD or ASD and their driving instructors2017In: Developmental Neurorehabilitation, ISSN 1751-8423, E-ISSN 1751-8431, Vol. 20, no 2, p. 59-67Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Little is known about whether individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) or attention deficit hyperactive disorder (ADHD) experience any specific facilitators or barriers to driving education.

    Objective: To explore the facilitators or barriers to driving education experienced by individuals with ASD or ADHD who obtained a learner’s permit, from the perspective of the learner drivers and their driving instructors.

    Methods: Data were collected from 33 participants with ASD or ADHD, and nine of their driving instructors.

    Results: Participants with ASD required twice as many driving lessons and more on-road tests than those with ADHD. Participants with ADHD repeated the written tests more than those with ASD. Driving license theory was more challenging for individuals with ADHD, whilst individuals with ASD found translating theory into practice and adjusting to “unfamiliar” driving situations to be the greatest challenges.

    Conclusion: Obtaining a driving license was associated with stressful training experience.

  • 4.
    Almqvist, Lena
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD. Mälardalens högskola.
    Sjöman, Madeleine
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Golsäter, Marie
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare.
    Granlund, Mats
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Behavioural Science and Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Children’s behavior difficulties and staff-implemented special support in Swedish preschools: Emotional and behavioral difficultiesManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 5.
    Axelsson, Anna Karin
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    The role of the external personal assistants for children with profound intellectual and multiple disabilities working in the children's home2015In: JARID: Journal of applied research in intellectual disabilities, ISSN 1360-2322, E-ISSN 1468-3148, Vol. 28, no 3, p. 201-211Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Children with profound intellectual and multiple disabilities need support to function in an optimal way. However, there is a limited knowledge about the role of external personal assistants working in the children's home. Materials and Methods A mixed method study was performed including qualitative data from interviews with 11 Swedish parents and nine external personal assistants and quantitative data from questionnaires answered by 60 families. Results For the child, the assistant's role was one of reinforcing, meaning supportive and empowering, and the child needed a high level of assistance. For the family, the role was one of balancing and the external personal assistant was more often found to assist in activities away from home while parents tended to assist within home and in family unit activities. Conclusion In planning and implementation of external assistance, the child's needs as well as considerations of the whole family should be regarded.

  • 6.
    Bixo Ottosson, Anna
    et al.
    Department of Internal Medicine, Västmanland County Hospital, Västerås, Sweden.
    Åkesson, Karin
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, The Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare. Department of Paediatrics, Ryhov County Hospital, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Ilvered, Rosita
    Department of Paediatrics, Ryhov County Hospital, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Forsander, Gun
    Institute of Clinical Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Särnblad, Stefan
    Department of Paediatrics, University Hospital Örebro, Örebro, Sweden.
    Self-care management of type 1 diabetes has improved in Swedish schools according to children and adolescents2017In: Acta Paediatrica, ISSN 0803-5253, E-ISSN 1651-2227, Vol. 106, no 12, p. 1987-1993Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: Age-appropriate support for diabetes self-care is essential during school time, and we investigated the perceived quality of support children and adolescents received in 2015 and 2008.

    Methods: This national study was based on questionnaires answered by children and adolescents aged 6–15 years of age with type 1 diabetes attending schools or preschools in 2008 (n = 317) and 2015 (n = 570) and separate parental questionnaires. The subjects were recruited by Swedish paediatric diabetes units, with 41/44 taking part in 2008 and 41/42 in 2015.

    Results: Fewer participants said they were treated differently in school because of their diabetes in 2015 than 2008. The opportunity to perform insulin boluses and glucose monitoring in privacy increased (80% versus 88%; p < 0.05). Most (83%) adolescents aged 13–15 years were satisfied with the support they received, but levels were lower in girls (p < 0.05). More subjects had hypoglycaemia during school hours (84% versus 70%, p < 0.001), but hypoglycaemia support did not increase and was lower for adolescents than younger children (p < 0.001).

    Conclusion: Children and adolescents received more support for type 1 diabetes in Swedish schools in 2015 than 2008, but more support is needed by girls and during hypoglycaemia. 

  • 7.
    Björkman, Berit
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Enskär, Karin
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Nilsson, Stefan
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. The Sahlgrenska Academy, Institute of Health and Care Sciences, University of Gothenburg.
    Children's and parents' perceptions of care during the peri-radiographic process when the child is seen for a suspected fracture2016In: Radiography, ISSN 1078-8174, E-ISSN 1532-2831, Vol. 22, no 1, p. 71-76Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Visiting a Radiology department may elicit both positive and negative feelings for children and parents alike. This study investigated children's and parents' perceptions of care during the peri-radiographic process and whether these perceptions correlated with the child's perceptions of pain and distress.

    Methods

    This study utilized a quantitative descriptive design. Its data was collected in five Radiology departments, two where examinations are performed exclusively on children and three that treat both children and adults. Data collection contained questionnaires from children (n = 110) and their parent (n = 110) as well as children's self-reports of pain and distress.

    Results

    The findings illustrated that the children and their parent were satisfied with the care provided throughout the peri-radiographic process, unrelated to the child's self-reported levels of pain and distress or examination setting (i.e. children's department or general department). The highest scores of satisfaction were ascribed to “the radiographer's kindness and ability to help in a sufficient way,” whereas “available time to ask questions and to meet the child's emotional needs” received the lowest scores.

    Conclusions

    Parents and children alike perceived the radiographers as skilled and sensitive throughout the examination, while radiographers' time allocated to interacting with the child was not perceived be sufficiently covered.

  • 8.
    Björkman, Berit
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Fridell, Kent
    Karolinska Institutet, Clinical Science, Intervention and Technology, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Tavakol Olofsson, Parvin
    Vårdförbundet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Plausible scenarios for the radiography profession in Sweden in 20252017In: Radiography, ISSN 1078-8174, E-ISSN 1532-2831, Vol. 23, no 4, p. 314-320Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: Radiography is a healthcare speciality with many technical challenges. Advances in engineering and information technology applications may continue to drive and be driven by radiographers. The world of diagnostic imaging is changing rapidly and radiographers must be proactive in order to survive. To ensure sustainable development, organisations have to identify future opportunities and threats in a timely manner and incorporate them into their strategic planning. Hence, the aim of this study was to analyse and describe plausible scenarios for the radiography profession in 2025.

    Method: The study has a qualitative design with an inductive approach based on focus group interviews. The interviews were inspired by the Scenario-Planning method.

    Results: Of the seven trends identified in a previous study, the radiographers considered two as the most uncertain scenarios that would have the greatest impact on the profession should they occur. These trends, labelled "Access to career advancement" and "A sufficient number of radiographers", were inserted into the scenario cross. The resulting four plausible future scenarios were: The happy radiographer, the specialist radiographer, the dying profession and the assembly line.

    Conclusion: It is suggested that "The dying profession" scenario could probably be turned in the opposite direction by facilitating career development opportunities for radiographers within the profession. Changing the direction would probably lead to a profession composed of "happy radiographers" who are specialists, proud of their profession and competent to carry out advanced tasks, in contrast to being solely occupied by "the assembly line".

  • 9.
    Carlberg, Louise
    et al.
    Hälsa och Habilitering, Region Uppsala, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Granlund, Mats
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Achievement and participation in schools for young adolescents with self-reported neuropsychiatric disabilities: A cross-sectional study from the Southern part of Sweden2018In: Scandinavian Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1403-4948, E-ISSN 1651-1905Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Schools are expected to be an environment where children can reach their fullest potential and develop their talents, personality, as well as their mental and physical abilities. Children with disabilities often have restricted participation and lower achievement in school. The aim is to investigate if there are any differences in participation and achievement in school between adolescents, with and without self-reported neuropsychiatric disabilities, and to explore the relations between achievement and participation. 

    Methods: A cross-sectional study was carried out based on data collected from 1520 adolescents in the sixth and seventh grade, from the south of Sweden. Multiple logistic regression was conducted to explore the relationship between having a neuropsychiatric disability, with participation and achievement, and how different factors affected this relationship. 

    Results: Having a self-reported neuropsychiatric disability increases the likelihood of having restricted participation (adjusted odds ratio (AOR): 2.89; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.99–4.23) and lower achievement in school (AOR: 2.94; 95% CI: 2.06–4.24). These adolescents were also more likely to have negative relationships to their teachers, be bullied, have poorer connectedness to their parents, come from families with less money, be trying drugs and be male, in comparison to the adolescents without a neuropsychiatric disability. The odds of having lower achievement increased with lower engagement and absenteeism from class. 

    Conclusions: Adolescents with self-reported neuropsychiatric disabilities have a disadvantaged situation in school, and are exposed to factors that could have long-term negative effects. More longitudinal research is required to conclude what factors are causing restricted participation and low achievement.

  • 10.
    Carlsson, Noomi
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Paediatrics, Faculty of Health Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Johansson, AnnaKarin
    Department of Medicine and Health, Division of Nursing Science, Faculty of Health Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Abrahamsson, Agneta
    Department of Health and Society, University College of Kristianstad, Kristianstad, Sweden.
    Andersson-Gäre, Boel
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Quality Improvement and Leadership in Health and Welfare. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, The Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare.
    How to minimize children's environmental tobacco smoke exposure: an intervention in a clinical setting in high risk areas2013In: BMC Pediatrics, ISSN 1471-2431, E-ISSN 1471-2431, Vol. 13, no 76Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Despite the low prevalence of daily smokers in Sweden, children are still being exposed to environmental tobacco smoke (ETS), primarily by their smoking parents. A prospective intervention study using methods from Quality Improvement was performed in Child Health Care (CHC). The aim was to provide nurses with new methods for motivating and supporting parents in their efforts to protect children from ETS exposure. METHOD: Collaborative learning was used to implement and test an intervention bundle. Twenty-two CHC nurses recruited 86 families with small children which had at least one smoking parent. Using a bundle of interventions, nurses met and had dialogues with the parents over a one-year period. A detailed questionnaire on cigarette consumption and smoking policies in the home was answered by the parents at the beginning and at the end of the intervention, when children also took urine tests to determine cotinine levels. RESULTS: Seventy-two families completed the study. Ten parents (11%) quit smoking. Thirty-two families (44%) decreased their cigarette consumption. Forty-five families (63%) were outdoor smokers at follow up. The proportion of children with urinary cotinine values of >6 ng/ml had decreased. CONCLUSION: The intensified tobacco prevention in CHC improved smoking parents' ability to protect their children from ETS exposure.

  • 11.
    Cohen-Holzer, Marilyn
    et al.
    Pediatric and Adolescent Rehabilitation Center, Alyn Hospital, Jerusalem, Israel.
    Katz-Leurer, Michal
    Pediatric and Adolescent Rehabilitation Center, Alyn Hospital, Jerusalem, Israel.
    Meyer, Shirley
    Pediatric and Adolescent Rehabilitation Center, Alyn Hospital, Jerusalem, Israel.
    Green, Dido
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Center for Rehabilitation, Oxford Brookes University, Oxford, United Kingdom.
    Parush, Shula
    School of Occupational Therapy, Faculty of Medicine of Hadassah and the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Jerusalem, Israel.
    The effect of bimanual training with or without constraint on hand functions in children with unilateral cerebral palsy: A non-randomized clinical trial2017In: Physical & Occupational Therapy in Pediatrics, ISSN 0194-2638, E-ISSN 1541-3144, Vol. 37, no 5, p. 516-527Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim:

    To compare the effect of bimanual training with or without constraint on manual functions in children with unilateral cerebral palsy (UCP).

    Methods:

    Seventeen children aged 6–11 years with UCP participated in one of two intensive therapeutic camps: bimanual (n = 9) incorporating one hour of constraint (“Hybrid”) or Bimanual (n = 8). Each camp met for 2 weeks, 5 days per week for 6 hours each day. The Assisting Hand Assessment (AHA) and the Jebsen Taylor Test of Hand Function (JTTHF) examined bimanual and unimanual functions pre, post- and 3-months post-intervention.

    Results:

    A significant improvement was noted in AHA scores for both groups between the pre-, post- and three months post-intervention [Hybrid (F2; 16 = 85.5, p < 0.01); Bimanual (F2; 16 = 15.4, p < 0.01)] with no significant differences between groups over time (F2; 30 = 0.74, p = 0.48). For the JTTHF, a significant improvement was noted in the affected hand following the Hybrid program (F2; 30 = 7.45, p = 0.01), while following the Bimanual program a significant difference was noted only in the less-affected hand (F2; 16 = 6.02, p < 0.01].

    Conclusion:

    Both interventions Hybrid and Bimanual were similarly effective for improving use of the affected hand in bimanual tasks. The unique contribution of each intervention, the Hybrid program on the affected and the Bimanual on the less-affected side, warrants further examination.

  • 12.
    Day, Annika L.
    et al.
    Department of Physiotherapy, Ryhov County Hospital, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Währborg, Peter
    Andersson-Gäre, Boel
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, The Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. IMPROVE (Improvement, innovation, and leadership in health and welfare).
    Golsäter, Marie
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Futurum Akademi for Health and Care Region Jönköping County.
    Rydå, Ulla
    Jansson, Marian
    An evaluation of daily relaxation training and psychosomatic symptoms in young children2016In: Health Behavior and Policy Review, ISSN 2326-4403, Vol. 3, no 3, p. 198-208Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: We evaluated the efficacy of daily relaxation training on psychosomatic symptoms during one school year among 8-year-old children. Methods: Cortisol in saliva, abdominal circumference including body mass index (BMI), heart rate, rate pressure product (RPP), and stress in children (SIC) were measured. Teachers in the intervention classes were interviewed. The intervention consisted of a daily relaxation therapy (RT). Results: The intervention group showed reduced heart rate. Individuals of the intervention group showed an improvement regarding headaches and the ability to fall asleep. The qualitative results showed that the RT had a calming effect on both the children and the teachers. Conclusions: RT among children may be of use to cope with stress as interpreted by some improved parameters in the intervention group.

  • 13.
    de Schipper, Elles
    et al.
    Center of Neurodevelopmental Disorders (KIND), Stockholm, Sweden.
    Lundequist, Aiko
    Center of Neurodevelopmental Disorders (KIND), Stockholm, Sweden.
    Wilteus, Anna Löfgren
    Center of Neurodevelopmental Disorders (KIND), Stockholm, Sweden.
    Coghill, David
    University of Dundee, UK.
    de Vries, Petrus J.
    University of Cape Town, South Africa .
    Granlund, Mats
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Holtmann, Martin
    Ruhr University Bochum, Hamm, Germany.
    Jonsson, Ulf
    Center of Neurodevelopmental Disorders (KIND), Stockholm, Sweden.
    Karande, Sunil
    Seth G.S. Medical College and K.E.M. Hospital, Mumbai, India.
    Levy, Florence
    Prince of Wales Hospital and University of New South Wales, Sydney, Australia.
    Al-Modayfer, Omar
    College of Medicine, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia.
    Rohde, Luis
    Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, Brazil.
    Tannock, Rosemary
    University of Toronto, Canada.
    Tonge, Bruce
    Monash University, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia.
    Bölte, Sven
    Center of Neurodevelopmental Disorders (KIND), Stockholm, Sweden.
    A comprehensive scoping review of ability and disability in ADHD using the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health-Children and Youth Version (ICF-CY)2015In: European Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, ISSN 1018-8827, E-ISSN 1435-165X, Vol. 24, no 8, p. 859-872Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This is the first in a series of four empirical investigations to develop International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) Core Sets for Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD). The objective here was to use a comprehensive scoping review approach to identify the concepts of functional ability and disability used in the scientific ADHD literature and link these to the nomenclature of the ICF-CY. Systematic searches were conducted using Medline/PubMed, PsycINFO, ERIC and Cinahl, to extract the relevant concepts of functional ability and disability from the identified outcome studies of ADHD. These concepts were then linked to ICF-CY by two independent researchers using a standardized linking procedure. Data from identified studies were analysed until saturation of ICF-CY categories was reached. Eighty studies were included in the final analysis. Concepts contained in these studies were linked to 128 ICF-CY categories. Of these categories, 68 were considered to be particularly relevant to ADHD (i.e., identified in at least 5 % of the studies). Of these, 32 were related to Activities and participation, 31 were related to Body functions, and five were related to environmental factors. The five most frequently identified categories were school education (53 %), energy and drive functions (50 %), psychomotor functions (50 %), attention functions (49 %), and emotional functions (45 %). The broad variety of ICF-CY categories identified in this study underlines the necessity to consider ability and disability in ADHD across all dimensions of life, for which the ICF-CY provides a valuable and universally applicable framework. These results, in combination with three additional preparatory studies (expert survey, focus groups, clinical study), will provide a scientific basis to define the ICF Core Sets for ADHD for multi-purpose use in basic and applied research, and every day clinical practice.

  • 14.
    de Schipper, Elles
    et al.
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Mahdi, Soheil
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Coghill, David
    University of Dundee, Ninewells Hospital and Medical School, Dundee, United Kingdom.
    de Vries, Petrus J.
    University of Cape Town, South Africa.
    Gau, Susan Shur-Fen
    National Taiwan University Hospital and College of Medicine, Taipei, Taiwan.
    Granlund, Mats
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Behavioural Science and Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Holtmann, Martin
    Ruhr University Bochum, Hamm, Germany.
    Karande, Sunil
    Seth G.S. Medical College and K.E.M. Hospital, Mumbai, India.
    Levy, Florence
    School of Psychiatry, Prince of Wales Hospital and University of New South Wales, Sydney, Australia.
    Almodayfer, Omar
    Psychiatry Section, King Abdulaziz Medical City, College of Medicine, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia.
    Rohde, Luis
    Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, Brazil.
    Tannock, Rosemary
    The Hospital for Sick Children, University of Toronto, Canada.
    Bolte, Sven
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Towards an ICF core set for ADHD: a worldwide expert survey on ability and disability2015In: European Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, ISSN 1018-8827, E-ISSN 1435-165X, Vol. 24, no 12, p. 1509-1521Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This is the second in a series of four empirical studies designed to develop International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF and Children and Youth version, ICF-CY) core sets for attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). The objective of this stage was to gather the opinions from international experts on which ability and disability concepts were considered relevant to functioning in ADHD. An email-based survey was carried out amongst international experts in ADHD. Relevant functional ability and disability concepts were extracted from their responses and linked to the ICF/-CY categories by two independent researchers using a standardised linking procedure. 174 experts from 11 different disciplines and 45 different countries completed the survey. Meaningful concepts identified in their responses were linked to 185 ICF/-CY categories. Of these, 83 categories were identified by at least 5 % of the experts and considered the most relevant to ADHD: 30 of these were related to Body functions (most identified: attention functions, 85 %), 30 to Activities and Participation (most identified: school education, 52 %), 20 to Environmental factors (most identified: support from immediate family, 61 %), and 3 to Body structures (most identified: structure of brain, 83 %). Experts also provided their views on particular abilities related to ADHD, naming characteristics such as high-energy levels, flexibility and resiliency. Gender differences in the expression of ADHD identified by experts pertained mainly to females showing more internalising (e.g. anxiety, low self-esteem) and less externalising behaviours (e.g. hyperactivity), leading to a risk of late- and under-diagnosis in females. Results indicate that the impact of ADHD extends beyond the core symptom domains, into all areas of life and across the lifespan. The current study in combination with three additional preparatory studies (comprehensive scoping review, focus groups, clinical study) will provide the scientific basis to define the ADHD ICF/-CY core sets for multi-purpose use in basic and applied research and every day clinical practice.

  • 15.
    Donohue, Dana
    et al.
    Centre for Augmentative and Alternative Communication, University of Pretoria, South Africa.
    Bornman, Juan
    Centre for Augmentative and Alternative Communication, University of Pretoria, South Africa.
    Granlund, Mats
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Household size is associated with unintelligible speech in children who have intellectual disabilities: A South African study2015In: Developmental Neurorehabilitation, ISSN 1751-8423, E-ISSN 1751-8431, Vol. 18, no 6, p. 402-406Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to examine whether four socioeconomic factors, namely caregiver age, caregiver education, family income and/or household size were related to the presence of motor delays or unintelligible speech in South African children with intellectual disabilities. Methods: Caregivers of children with intellectual disabilities completed a biographical questionnaire regarding their home environments. Other items on the questionnaire queried whether their children experienced co-occurring developmental impairments of motor delays or unintelligible speech. Results: A total of 145 caregivers were included in the analyses. Two logistic regressions were run with the set of four socioeconomic factors as predictors, and motor delays and intelligible speech as the outcome variables. Household size was a statistically significant predictor of whether children evidenced intelligible speech. Conclusion: Children living in dwellings with more people were less likely to have intelligible speech. The processes through which large household size might influence children’s language are discussed.

  • 16.
    Enskär, Karin
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Ljusegren, Gunilla
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Gimbler Berglund, Ingalill
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science.
    Eaton, Nicola
    Harding, Rosemary
    Mokoena, Joyce
    Chauke, Motsedisi
    Moleki, Maria
    Attitudes to and knowledge about pain and pain management, of nurses working with children with cancer: A comparative study between UK, South Africa and Sweden2007In: Journal of Research in Nursing, ISSN 1744-9871, Vol. 12, no 5, p. 501-515Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Pain is among the most common effects of cancer and its treatment. Children and young people with cancer often consider pain from procedures and treatment to be the worst aspect of their illness. This study aimed to i) identify and describe knowledge and attitudes to pain and pain management amongst nurses working with children with cancer and ii) compare the perspectives on pain and pain management of nurses from UK, South Africa and Sweden. 106 nurses working with children with cancer in UK, South Africa and Sweden completed Salanterä’s (1999) questionnaire on nurses’ attitudes to pain in children. Nurses had good levels of knowledge and positive attitudes to pain management, with Swedish nurses’ having higher levels of knowledge and a more positive attitude to pain management than nurses from UK or South Africa. A high level of knowledge was correlated to a more positive attitude to pain management. Knowledge levels need to be improved to ensure more positive attitudes to pain management, especially for nurses in South Africa. Swedish nurses’ level of knowledge about non-pharmacological pain management strategies has scope for improvement. British nurses may need to focus more on the sociology and psychology of pain.

  • 17.
    Eriksson, Marit
    et al.
    Futurum, Region Jönköping County, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Lingfors, Hans
    Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Golsäter, Marie
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Trends in prevalence of thinness, overweight and obesity among Swedish children and adolescents between 2004 and 2015.2018In: Acta Paediatrica, ISSN 0803-5253, E-ISSN 1651-2227Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIM: This study explored weight trends among children aged 4, 7, 11, 14 and 17 years in Jönköping County Sweden, from 2004 to 2015.

    METHODS: The study had a repeated cross-sectional design, and body mass index (BMI) was calculated based on height and weight measurements collected from child health and school health records. The prevalence of thinness, overweight and obesity was estimated with international cut-offs, with linear trends calculated separately for boys and girls.

    RESULTS: There were 190 965 measurements of BMI and these covered 82-97% of the younger children and 55-69% of the older children during the study period. The prevalence of thinness varied between 0.2% and 2.2% across time and age groups and did not change over the study period. There was a small decrease in overweight among both girls and boys aged four years. There were increasing trends in overweight and obesity in both girls and boys aged 11 and 14 years of age and a sharp increase among 17-year-old boys, with 7.3% obese in 2014/2015 and 3.6% in 2004/2005.

    CONCLUSION: The prevalence of obesity decreased from 2004 to 2015 or was stable in younger Swedish children, but increased among older children, with a large increase in adolescent boys.

  • 18.
    Gimbler Berglund, Ingalill
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Huus, Karina
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Enskär, Karin
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Faresjö, Maria
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Biomedical Platform.
    Björkman, Berit
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Perioperative and anesthesia guidelines for children with autism: A nationwide survey from Sweden2016In: Journal of Developmental and Behavioral Pediatrics, ISSN 0196-206X, E-ISSN 1536-7312, Vol. 37, no 6, p. 457-464Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: The overall aim of this study was to describe the current set of guidelines for the preparation and care for children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) in the perioperative setting across Sweden and explore the content of these guidelines in detail.

    Method: An online questionnaire was distributed to the chairpersons of all anesthesia departments (n = 68) and pediatric departments (n = 38) throughout Sweden. Follow-up phone calls were made to those departments that did not return the questionnaire. The presence of guidelines was analyzed through descriptive statistics. These guidelines and comments on routines used in these departments were analyzed inspired by conventional content analysis.

    Results: Seven of the 68 anesthesia departments and none of the 38 pediatric departments across Sweden have guidelines for preparing and/or administering care to children with ASD within the perioperative setting. From the guidelines and routines used, 3 categories emerge: "lacking the necessary conditions," "no extra considerations needed," and "care with specific consideration for children with ASD." These 3 categories span a continuum in the care. In the first category, the anesthesia induction could result in the child with ASD being physically restrained. In the last category, the entire encounter with the health care service would be adapted to the specific needs of the child.

    Conclusion: There is a lack of evidence-based guidelines specifically designed to meet the needs of children with ASD in the preoperative period in Sweden. Further research is needed to understand if children with ASD would benefit from evidence-based guidelines.

  • 19.
    Gorjy, Rebecca Soraya
    et al.
    School of Occupational Therapy and Social Work Curtin University Perth, Western Australia Australia.
    Fielding, Angela
    School of Occupational Therapy and Social Work Curtin University Perth, Western Australia Australia.
    Falkmer, Marita
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD. School of Occupational Therapy and Social Work, Faculty of Health Sciences, Curtin University, Perth, Australia.
    "It's better than it used to be": Perspectives of adolescent siblings of children with an autism spectrum condition2017In: Child & Family Social Work, ISSN 1356-7500, E-ISSN 1365-2206, Vol. 22, no 4, p. 1488-1496Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article reports on the lived experiences of 11 adolescents who have a brother or a sister with a diagnosis of autism spectrum condition. Through semistructured, in-depth, in-person interviews, these adolescents shared their experiences and perceptions. These exploratory findings can be used to inform the practice of social workers and other health professionals, and future research. Implications for practice focus on the importance of exploring experiences and perceptions of siblings of children diagnosed with autism spectrum condition to enhance support services for these siblings.

  • 20.
    Granlund, Mats
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Behavioural Science and Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Lillvist, Anne
    School of Education, Culture and Communication, Mälardalen University.
    Factors influencing participation by preschool children with mild intellectual disabilities in Sweden: with or without diagnosis2015In: Research and Practice in Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities, ISSN 2329-7018 (Print), 2329-7026 (Online), Vol. 2, no 2, p. 126-135Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article analyses the conceptualisation of mild intellectual disability and developmental delay in young children in Sweden, particularly in regard to children's participation and possible stigmatisation in preschool. A diagnosis of intellectual disability is more likely to ensure that preschool staff received targeted external support. However, children with or without a diagnosis can exhibit the same functional problems. Current research in the area suggests that a diagnosis itself will not guarantee that external support is provided for the child. Nor does a diagnosis always lead to stigmatisation. Research indicates that the manner in which special support is delivered may contribute to stigmatisation. The current provision of special support can mean that a child does not participate in the same activities as other children, when ideally special support should facilitate participation in the same activities as others. Other means to identify children for targeted support may be necessary in order to provide targeted services earlier.

  • 21.
    Green, Dido
    Centre for Rehabilitation, Oxford Brookes University, Oxford, United Kingdom.
    Are proprioceptive functions affected in Duchenne muscular dystrophy?2014In: Developmental Medicine & Child Neurology, ISSN 0012-1622, E-ISSN 1469-8749, Vol. 56, no 9, p. 805-806Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 22.
    Green, Dido
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Centre for Rehabilitation, Oxford Brookes University, Oxford, United Kingdom.
    Challenges in combining upper limb and lower limb interventions in protocols for children with brain injury2017In: Developmental Medicine & Child Neurology, ISSN 0012-1622, E-ISSN 1469-8749, Vol. 59, no 3, p. 335-335Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 23.
    Green, Dido
    Guy's and St Thomas' NHS Foundation Trust, London, United Kingdom.
    Developmental coordination disorder in children with ADHD and physical therapy intervention2010In: Developmental Medicine & Child Neurology, ISSN 0012-1622, E-ISSN 1469-8749, Vol. 52, no 3, p. 308-308Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 24.
    Green, Dido
    NIHR GSTFT/KCL Biomedical Research Centre, Newcomen Centre, Guy's Hospital, London, United Kingdom.
    Hand function and fine motor activities2009In: Finnie's Handling the Young Child with Cerebral Palsy at Home / [ed] Eva Bower, Elsevier, 2009, 4, p. 243-268Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 25.
    Green, Dido
    Centre for Rehabilitation, Oxford Brookes University, Oxford, United Kingdom.
    Translating evidence into practice2014In: Developmental Medicine & Child Neurology, ISSN 0012-1622, E-ISSN 1469-8749, Vol. 56, no 12, p. 1132-1133Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 26.
    Green, Dido
    et al.
    Newcomen Centre, Guy's Hospital, London, United Kingdom.
    Baird, G.
    Sugden, D.
    A pilot study of psychopathology in Developmental Coordination Disorder2006In: Child Care Health and Development, ISSN 0305-1862, E-ISSN 1365-2214, Vol. 32, no 6, p. 741-750Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background:

    This paper explores the prevalence of emotional and behavioural disorders in children referred to a Community Paediatric Occupational Therapy service for assessment and treatment of problems with development of motor skills.

    Methods:

    Parents of 47 children from a clinical sample of children who had been identified with Developmental Coordination Disorder (DCD) returned the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire (SDQ) - a brief measure of the pro-social behaviour and psychopathology that can be completed by parents, teachers or youths.

    Results:

    Significant emotional and behavioural problems were reported by 29 parents (62%) with a further six (13%) reporting problems in the borderline range. Seven children (15%) were without significant problems in one or more area although only four of these (9%) were outside the borderline range for all of the sub-domains of the SDQ.

    Discussion:

    A significant proportion of children with DCD were reported by their parents to be at risk of psychopathology. Further research is needed to understand the relationship between motor difficulties and emotional and behavioural symptoms; however, it is recommended that interventions for children with DCD should support mental health and behavioural problems as well as motor development.

  • 27.
    Green, Dido
    et al.
    Guy's ad St Thomas' NHS Foundation Trust, London, United Kingdom.
    Charman, T.
    Pickles, A.
    Chandler, S.
    Loucas, T.
    Simonoff, E.
    Baird, G.
    Impairment in movement skills of children with autistic spectrum disorders2009In: Developmental Medicine & Child Neurology, ISSN 0012-1622, E-ISSN 1469-8749, Vol. 51, no 4, p. 311-316Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim:

    We undertook this study to explore the degree of impairment in movement skills in children with autistic spectrum disorders (ASD) and a wide IQ range.

    Methods:

    Movement skills were measured using the Movement Assessment Battery for Children (M-ABC) in a large, well defined, population-derived group of children (n = 101: 89 males, 12 females; mean age 11 y 4 mo, SD 10 mo; range 10 y-14 y 3 mo) with childhood autism and broader ASD and a wide range of IQ scores. Additionally, we tested whether a parent-completed questionnaire, the Developmental Coordination Disorder Questionnaire (DCDQ), was useful in identifying children who met criteria for movement impairments after assessment (n = 97 with complete M-ABCs and DCDQs).

    Results:

    Of the children with ASD, 79% had definite movement impairments on the M-ABC; a further 10% had borderline problems. Children with childhood autism were more impaired than children with broader ASD, and children with an IQ less than 70 were more impaired than those with IQ more than 70. This is consistent with the view that movement impairments may arise from a more severe neurological impairment that also contributes to intellectual disability and more severe autism. Movement impairment was not associated with everyday adaptive behaviour once the effect of IQ was controlled for. The DCDQ performed moderately well as a screen for possible motor difficulties.

    Interretation:

    Movement impairments are common in children with ASD. Systematic assessment of movement abilities should be considered a routine investigation.

  • 28.
    Green, Dido
    et al.
    Centre for Rehabilitation, Oxford Brookes University, Marston Road Campus, Jack Straw s Lane, Oxford, United Kingdom.
    Lim, M.
    Lang, B.
    Pohl, K.
    Turk, J.
    Sensory Processing Difficulties in Opsoclonus-Myoclonus Syndrome2016In: Journal of Child Neurology, ISSN 0883-0738, E-ISSN 1708-8283, Vol. 31, no 8, p. 965-970Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Opsoclonus-myoclonus syndrome is a rare but serious neurological condition resulting in loss of control of eye movements, often accompanied by difficulties in posture and movement control with reports of sensory sensitivities potentially impacting on behavior. This pilot study characterizes the presence of atypical sensory behaviors in opsoclonus-myoclonus syndrome through questionnaire survey of a cohort of families. The Short Sensory Profile, Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scale, and Developmental Behaviour Checklist were distributed to 30 families; 16 were returned anonymously. Atypical sensory behaviors were identified in a large proportion (62.5%). Children reported as being more anxious showed greater sensitivity to auditory stimuli, U(14) 11, P =.026. This is consistent with recent recognition of more extensive disease neurocognitive effects in Opsoclonus-myoclonus syndrome. Further research is needed to increase understanding of the complex pathology of this disease and to provide indicators for sensory and behavioral as well as pharmacological interventions.

  • 29.
    Green, Dido
    et al.
    Newcomen Centre, Guy's Hospital, London, United Kingdom.
    Lingam, R.
    Mattocks, C.
    Riddoch, C.
    Ness, A.
    Emond, A.
    The risk of reduced physical activity in children with probable Developmental Coordination Disorder: A prospective longitudinal study2011In: Research in Developmental Disabilities, ISSN 0891-4222, E-ISSN 1873-3379, Vol. 32, no 4, p. 1332-1342Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of the current study was to test the hypothesis that children with probable Developmental Coordination Disorder have an increased risk of reduced moderate to vigorous physical activity (MVPA), using data from a large population based study. Prospectively collected data from 4331 children (boys = 2065, girls = 2266) who had completed motor coordination testing at 7 years and accelerometry at 12 years were analysed from the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children (ALSPAC). Probable DCD (p-DCD) was defined, using criteria based on the DSM IV classification, as those children below the 15th centile of the ALSPAC Coordination Test at seven years who had a functional impairment in activities of daily living or handwriting, excluding children with a known neurological diagnosis or IQ < 70. Secondary exposure variables consisted of subtests from the ALSPAC Coordination test (manual dexterity, ball skills and balance). Objective measurement of the average daily minutes of MVPA was recorded as ≥3600 counts per minute (cpm) using actigraph accelerometry. Boys with p-DCD were less physically active than boys without DCD (mean difference in MVPA 4.36. cpm, t= 2.69; p= 0.007). For boys, targeting skill (bean bag toss) was related to increased MVPA, after adjustment for confounding factors including neonatal, family and environmental factors as well as Body Mass Index at age seven and 12 years (β= 0.76, t= 3.37, p< 0.001, CI 0.32-1.20). There was no difference in level of MVPA in girls with and without p-DCD (mean difference 1.35. min, t= 0.97, p= 0.31), which may reflect the low levels of MVPA of girls in this cohort. Our findings suggest that the presence of movement difficulties, particularly poor targeting (bean bag toss/ball skills), at a young age is a potential risk factor for reduced MVPA in boys.

  • 30.
    Green, Dido
    et al.
    Department of Occupational Therapy, School of Health Professions, Sackler School of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Ramat Aviv, Israel.
    Meroz, A.
    Margalit, A. E.
    Ratzon, N. Z.
    A validation study of the Keyboard Personal Computer Style instrument (K-PeCS) for use with children2012In: Applied Ergonomics, ISSN 0003-6870, E-ISSN 1872-9126, Vol. 43, no 6, p. 985-992Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study examines a potential instrument for measurement of typing postures of children. This paper describes inter-rater, test-retest reliability and concurrent validity of the Keyboard Personal Computer Style instrument (K-PeCS), an observational measurement of postures and movements during keyboarding, for use with children. Two trained raters independently rated videos of 24 children (aged 7-10 years). Six children returned one week later for identifying test-retest reliability. Concurrent validity was assessed by comparing ratings obtained using the K-PECS to scores from a 3D motion analysis system. Inter-rater reliability was moderate to high for 12 out of 16 items (Kappa: 0.46 to 1.00; correlation coefficients: 0.77-0.95) and test-retest reliability varied across items (Kappa: 0.25 to 0.67; correlation coefficients: r = 0.20 to r = 0.95). Concurrent validity compared favourably across arm pathlength, wrist extension and ulnar deviation. In light of the limitations of other tools the K-PeCS offers a fairly affordable, reliable and valid instrument to address the gap for measurement of typing styles of children, despite the shortcomings of some items. However further research is required to refine the instrument for use in evaluating typing among children.

  • 31.
    Green, Dido
    et al.
    Department of Occupational Therapy, Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv, Israel.
    Schertz, M.
    Gordon, A. M.
    Moore, A.
    Schejter Margalit, T.
    Farquharson, Y.
    Ben Bashat, D.
    Weinstein, M.
    Lin, J. -P
    Fattal-Valevski, A.
    A multi-site study of functional outcomes following a themed approach to hand-arm bimanual intensive therapy for children with hemiplegia2013In: Developmental Medicine & Child Neurology, ISSN 0012-1622, E-ISSN 1469-8749, Vol. 55, no 6, p. 527-533Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim:

    This study investigated the effects of a theme-based ('magic') variation of the hand-arm bimanual intensive therapy programme, in two different countries, in improving activity performance for children with hemiplegia, including those with severe movement restrictions.

    Method:

    Twenty-three children with spastic hemiplegia (13 males, 10 females; mean age 10y 7mo, range 7-15y; Manual Ability Classification System level I, two; level II, 13; level III, eight), participated in one of three, 2-week, summer camps. A within-participant experimental design was used with the Assisting Hand Assessment and Children's Hand Experience Questionnaire as primary outcome measures. Evaluations occurred immediately before the first day, on the last day, and 3 months after intervention. Two groups underwent additional assessments 2 weeks before the camp.

    Results:

    Significant intervention effects were seen on the Assisting Hand Assessment (p=0.002) and on the Children's Hand Experience Questionnaire (p<0.001), the latter maintained at follow-up. The affected hand was reported to be used in 25% of bimanual activities before the camp, progressing to 93% after camp, and decreasing to 86% at follow-up. Severity of impairment did not influence progress.

    Interpretation:

    This themed approach to intensive intervention showed positive results in bimanual use, with improvements in independence sustained at follow-up. Although children across camps and motor severity made progress, some questions remain about intensity and duration of intervention to optimize longer-term outcomes.

  • 32.
    Green, Dido
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Ziviani, Jenny
    The arts and children’s occupational opportunities2017In: Occupation-centred practice with children: a practical guide for occupational therapists / [ed] Sylvia Rodger, Ann Kennedy-Behr, Chichester: John Wiley & Sons, 2017, 2, p. 311-328Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 33. Gringras, P.
    et al.
    Green, Dido
    Centre for Rehabilitation, Oxford Brookes University, Oxford, United Kingdom.
    Wright, B.
    Rush, C.
    Sparrowhawk, M.
    Pratt, K.
    Allgar, V.
    Hooke, N.
    Moore, D.
    Zaiwalla, Z.
    Wiggs, L.
    Weighted blankets and sleep in autistic children - A randomized controlled trial2014In: Pediatrics, ISSN 0031-4005, E-ISSN 1098-4275, Vol. 134, no 2, p. 298-306Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE:

    To assess the effectiveness of a weighted-blanket intervention in treating severe sleep problems in children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD).

    METHODS:

    This phase III trial was a randomized, placebo-controlled crossover design. Participants were aged between 5 years and 16 years 10 months, with a confirmed ASD diagnosis and severe sleep problems, refractory to community-based interventions. The interventions were either a commercially available weighted blanket or otherwise identical usual weight blanket (control), introduced at bedtime; each was used for a 2-week period before crossover to the other blanket. Primary outcome was total sleep time (TST) recorded by actigraphy over each 2-week period. Secondary outcomes included actigraphically recorded sleeponset latency, sleep efficiency, assessments of child behavior, family functioning, and adverse events. Sleep was also measured by using parent-report diaries.

    RESULTS:

    Seventy-three children were randomized and analysis conducted on 67 children who completed the study. Using objective measures, the weighted blanket, compared with the control blanket, did not increase TST as measured by actigraphy and adjusted for baseline TST. There were no group differences in any other objective or subjective measure of sleep, including behavioral outcomes. On subjective preference measures, parents and children favored the weighted blanket.

    CONCLUSIONS:

    The use of a weighted blanket did not help children with ASD sleep for a longer period of time, fall asleep significantly faster, or wake less often. However, the weighted blanket was favored by children and parents, and blankets were well tolerated over this period.

  • 34. Hagelberg, Stefan
    et al.
    Andersson Gäre, BoelJönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, The Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare.Fasth, AndersMånsson, BengtEnman, Yvonne
    Barnreumatologi2008Collection (editor) (Other academic)
  • 35. Hammond, J.
    et al.
    Jones, V.
    Hill, E. L.
    Green, Dido
    Centre for Rehabilitation, Oxford Brookes University, Oxford, United Kingdom.
    Male, I.
    An investigation of the impact of regular use of the Wii Fit to improve motor and psychosocial outcomes in children with movement difficulties: A pilot study2014In: Child Care Health and Development, ISSN 0305-1862, E-ISSN 1365-2214, Vol. 40, no 2, p. 165-175Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background:

    Children with Developmental Co-ordination Disorder (DCD) experience poor motor and psychosocial outcomes. Interventions are often limited within the healthcare system, and little is known about how technology might be used within schools or homes to promote the motor skills and/or psychosocial development of these children. This study aimed to evaluate whether short, regular school-based sessions of movement experience using a commercially available home video game console (Nintendo's Wii Fit) would lead to benefits in both motor and psychosocial domains in children with DCD.

    Methods:

    A randomized crossover controlled trial of children with movement difficulties/DCD was conducted. Children were randomly assigned to an intervention (n = 10) or comparison (n = 8) group. The intervention group spent 10min thrice weekly for 1 month using Wii Fit during the lunch break, while the comparison group took part in their regular Jump Ahead programme. Pre- and post-intervention assessments considered motor proficiency, self-perceived ability and satisfaction and parental assessment of emotional and behavioural problems.

    Results:

    Significant gains were seen in motor proficiency, the child's perception of his/her motor ability and reported emotional well-being for many, but not all children.

    Conclusions:

    This study provides preliminary evidence to support the use of the Wii Fit within therapeutic programmes for children with movement difficulties. This simple, popular intervention represents a plausible method to support children's motor and psychosocial development. It is not possible from our data to say which children are most likely to benefit from such a programme and particularly what the dose and duration should be. Further research is required to inform across these and other questions regarding the implementation of virtual reality technologies in therapeutic services for children with movement difficulties.

  • 36.
    Hanberger, Lena
    et al.
    Division of Nursing Science, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Samuelsson, Ulf
    Division of Paediatrics, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Holl, Reinhard W
    Institute of Epidemiology and Medical Biometry, ZIBMT, University of Ulm, Ulm, Germany.
    Fröhlich-Reiterer, Elke
    Department of Pediatrics, Medical University of Graz, Graz, Austria.
    Åkesson, Karin
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, The Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare. Division of Paediatrics, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Hofer, Sabine
    Department of Pediatrics, Medical University of Innsbruck, Innsbruck, Austria.
    Type 1 diabetes during adolescence: International comparison between Germany, Austria, and Sweden.2018In: Pediatric Diabetes, ISSN 1399-543X, E-ISSN 1399-5448, Vol. 19, no 3, p. 506-511Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVES: By using pediatric diabetes quality registries in Austria, Germany, and Sweden treatment of type 1 diabetes and the outcome of care during the vulnerable adolescence period were compared.

    METHODS: Data in DPV, broadly used in Austria and Germany, and Swediabkids used in Sweden, from clinical visits in the year 2013 on 14 383 patients aged 11 to 16 years regarding hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c), insulin regimen, body mass index (BMI)-SD score (SDS), blood pressure, hypoglycemia, ketoacidosis, and smoking habits were analyzed.

    RESULTS: Patients in Sweden had fewer clinical visits per year (P < .05), lower insulin dose per kg (P < .001), and lower proportion of fast acting insulin compared with Germany and Austria (P < .001). The proportion of pump users was higher in Sweden (P < .001). Patients in Sweden had lower mean HbA1c levels (Austria: 64 mmol/mol, Germany: 63 mmol/mol, and Sweden: 61 mmol/mol [8.0%, 7.9%, and 7.7%, respectively]; P < .001). The frequency of severe hypoglycemia was higher in Sweden while it was lower for ketoacidosis (3.3% and 1.1%, respectively) than in Austria (1.1% and 5.3%) and Germany (2.0% and 4.4%) (P < .001). Girls in all 3 countries had higher HbA1c and BMI-SDS than boys.

    CONCLUSIONS: Sharing data between diabetes registries and nations enables us to better understand differences in diabetes outcome between countries. In this particular comparison, pediatric patients with diabetes in Sweden were more often treated with insulin pump, had lower HbA1c levels and a higher rate of severe hypoglycemia. Patients in Austria and Germany used rapid acting insulin analogs more often and had a lower rate of ketoacidosis.

  • 37.
    Huus, Karina
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Granlund, Mats
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Behavioural Science and Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Bornman, J.
    Centre for Augmentative and Alternative Communication, University of Pretoria, South Africa.
    Lygnegård, Frida
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Behavioural Science and Social Work.
    Human rights of children with intellectual disabilities: comparing self-ratings and proxy ratings2015In: Child Care Health and Development, ISSN 0305-1862, E-ISSN 1365-2214, Vol. 41, no 6, p. 1010-1017Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    A child rights-based approach to research articulates well with Article 12 of the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child (CRC) and highlights the importance and value of including children's own views about aspects that concern them. The aim of this study is to compare children with intellectual disability's own ratings (as self-raters) to those of their primary caregivers (as proxy raters) regarding human rights of children. The study also aims to establish whether there is an inter-rater agreement between the self-raters and proxy raters concerning Maslow's hierarchy of needs.

    Method

    This study is nested in a larger study examining the human rights of children with intellectual disability in South Africa. In total, 162 children with intellectual disability from 11 schools across three provinces and their primary caregivers participated by answering parts of a Children'sRightsQuestionnaire (CRQ) developed by the researchers based on the United Nation's CRC. We compared the answers for six questions in the questionnaire that were addressed to self-raters (children) and proxy raters (primary caregivers) in the same way.

    Results

    Questions regarding basic needs, such as access to clean water or whether the child had food to eat at home, were answered similarly by self-raters and proxy raters. Larger differences were found when self-raters and proxy raters were asked about whether the child had things or friends to play with at home. Socio-economic variables seemed to affect whether self-raters and proxy raters answered similarly.

    Conclusion

    The results underscore the importance of promoting children's rights to express themselves by considering the opinions of both the children as self-raters and their primary caregivers as proxy raters – not only the latter. The results indicate that it is especially important to include children's own voices when more complex needs are surveyed. Agreement between self- and proxy ratings could be affected by socio-economic circumstances.

  • 38.
    Huus, Karina
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Division of Pediatrics, Diabetes Research Centre, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden .
    Ludvigsson, Jonas F
    Department of Pediatrics, Clinical Research Centre, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden; Clinical Epidemiology Unit, Department of Medicine, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden .
    Enskär, Karin
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. CHILD.
    Ludvigsson, Johnny
    Division of Pediatrics, Diabetes Research Centre, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden .
    Exclusive breastfeeding of Swedish children and its possible influence on the development of obesity: a prospective cohort study2008In: BMC Pediatrics, ISSN 1471-2431, E-ISSN 1471-2431, Vol. 8, article id 42Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Overweight and obesity are increasing among children all over the world. Socio-economic factors may influence the development of overweight and obesity in childhood, and it has been proposed that breastfeeding may protect against obesity. The aim of our study was to examine the relationship between exclusive breastfeeding and obesity when potential confounders, such as socioeconomic factors, are considered. METHODS: The data analyzed was from ABIS (All Babies in Southeast Sweden), a prospective cohort study. All parents with children born between October 1, 1997 and October 1, 1999 in Southeast Sweden (n = 21,700) were asked to participate. Parents were asked to answer periodic questionnaires from the time of the child's birth (n = 16,058) until he/she was five years of age (n = 7,356). Cutoffs for overweight and obesity were defined according to Cole et al, age and gender adjusted. Short-term exclusive breastfeeding was defined as < 4 months of exclusive breastfeeding. Multiple logistic regressions were used to identify variables that predict the child's BMI (Body Mass Index) at five years of age. RESULTS: At five years of age, 12.9% of the children in the study were overweight and 4.3% were obese. At the age of three months, 78.4% of the children were being breastfed exclusively. The median exclusive breastfeeding duration was four months. High maternal BMI > 30 (AOR = 1.07; CI = 1.05-1.09; P < 0.001), maternal smoking (AOR = 1.43; CI = 1.05-1.95; P = 0.023) and being a single parent (AOR = 2.10; CI = 1.43-3.09; P < 0.001) were associated with short-term exclusive breastfeeding (less than 4 months). Short-term exclusive breastfeeding was less common if one of the parents had a university degree (Mother: AOR = 0.74; CI = 0.61-0.90; P = 0.003 Father: AOR = 0.73; CI = 0.58-0.92; P = 0.008) or if the father was more than 37 years old (AOR = 0.74; CI = 0.55-0.99; P = 0.045). Short-term exclusive breastfeeding was associated with obesity in five-year-old children (simple logistic regression: OR = 1.44; CI = 1.00-2.07; P = 0.050), but when including other independent factors in the analysis, short-term exclusive breastfeeding did not attain statistical significance. CONCLUSION: We cannot exclude the possibility that exclusive breastfeeding influences weight development, but it does not seem to protect against obesity at five years of age.

  • 39.
    Huus, Karina
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Åkerman, Linda
    Linköping University, Sweden.
    Raustorp, Anders
    Linnaeus University and University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Ludvigsson, Johnny
    Linköping University and Östergötland County Council, Sweden.
    Physical Activity, Blood Glucose and C-Peptide in Healthy School-Children, a Longitudinal Study2016In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 11, no 6, article id e0156401Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim

    To further elucidate the relationship between physical activity and several risk factors for development of diabetes (glucose, C-peptide and obesity) over time.

    Methods

    A prospective longitudinal study where physical activity was measured on 199 children from Kalmar and Linköping at age 8, and the same 107 children from Linköping again at age 12. Anthropometric data was collected and blood was analyzed for C-peptide and f-glucose. The children in the study were representative for the general Swedish child population, and on an average lean.

    Results

    High physical activity was related to lower C-peptide at age 8 and 12. This correlation was especially pronounced in boys, who also were more physically active than girls at both time points. The association seen at 8 years of age was similar at age 12 in most children. Children with higher BMI Z-Score had a higher fasting C-peptide (age 12) but linear regression showed that children with more steps per day were less likely to have a higher fasting C-peptide irrespective of BMI. Longitudinal follow-up showed that a decrease in physical activity increased insulin resistance and β-cell load.

    Conclusions

    Already in young children, physical activity improves insulin sensitivity and decreases the need of C-peptide over time. This seems to become even more pronounced with increasing age when children are followed longitudinally. Low physical activity increases the load on insulin producing β-cells, might increase the risk for both type 1- and 2 diabetes.

  • 40.
    Imms, Christine
    et al.
    School of Allied Health and Centre for Disability and Development Research, Faculty of Health Sciences, Australian Catholic University, Fitzroy, Vic., Australia.
    Adair, Brooke Adair
    School of Allied Health and Centre for Disability and Development Research, Faculty of Health Sciences, Australian Catholic University, Fitzroy, Vic., Australia.
    Keen, Deb
    Autism Centre of Excellence, Griffith University, Mt Gravatt, Qld, Australia.
    Ullenhag, Anna
    Department of Women's and Children's Health, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Rosenbaum, Peter
    School of Allied Health and Centre for Disability and Development Research, Faculty of Health Sciences, Australian Catholic University, Fitzroy, Vic., Australia.
    Granlund, Mats
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Behavioural Science and Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    ‘Participation’: a systematic review of language, definitions, and constructs used in intervention research with children with disabilities2016In: Developmental Medicine & Child Neurology, ISSN 0012-1622, E-ISSN 1469-8749, Vol. 58, no 1, p. 29-38Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim

    Improving participation of children with disabilities is a priority; however, the participation construct lacks clarity. This systematic review investigated how researchers defined ‘participation’ and the language used in participation intervention research.

    Method

    Nine health and education databases were searched for intervention studies of children with disabilities that included a participation outcome. Quantitative data were extracted using a customized form, and participation text data were extracted verbatim. Themes were derived using a thematic coding approach. These participation themes were applied to the outcome measures used in the included studies to compare participation language with the methods used to quantify participation changes.

    Results

    Of the 2257 articles retrieved, 25 were included in this review. Five participation themes and nine subthemes were developed. Two themes, attendance and involvement, were directly related to the participation construct. Three additional themes described related concepts: preferences, activity competence, and sense of self.

    Interpretation

    Attendance and involvement seem to describe the essence of the participation concept. The related themes may provide important avenues to enhance participation outcomes. This review highlighted the need for researchers to define the construct under investigation clearly and select measures carefully, as measurement choice is the mechanism through which the concept is operationalized in research.

  • 41.
    Juul, Jolanta
    et al.
    Univ Gothenburg, Dept Otorhinolaryngol, Sect Audiol,Sahlgrenska Acad, Inst Neurosci & Physiol,Sahlgrenska Univ Hosp, SE-41345 Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Barrenas, Marie-Louise
    Univ Gothenburg, Dept Paediat, Gothenburg Paediat Growth Res Ctr, Inst Clin Sci,Sahlgrenska Acad,Queen Silvia Child, SE-41345 Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Holgers, Kajsa-Mia
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, The Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare.
    Tinnitus and hearing in 7-year-old children2012In: Archives of Disease in Childhood, ISSN 0003-9888, E-ISSN 1468-2044, Vol. 97, no 1, p. 28-30Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Tinnitus occurs with or without prior noise exposure (noise-induced tinnitus (NIT) and spontaneous tinnitus (ST)), and is considered a symptom related to permanent hearing impairment (HI) or temporary hearing threshold shift (TTS). Objective To carry out a cross-sectional interview study on TTS, ST and NIT during a standard audiometric screening of 756 7-year-old children in Gothenburg. Results 41% out of 756 children reported either NIT or ST on several occasions, 17% reported recurrent TTS and 7% failed the audiometry screening. The probability of ST was 27% for children with no HI or TTS (OR=1.23 (95% CI 1.12 to 1.34)) but 63% (OR=1.16 (95% CI 1.02 to 1.33)) if exhibiting both HI and TTS. Conclusion This study confirms an increased occurrence of spontaneous tinnitus in children with TTS or HI and in children with both TTS and HI, in particular, but also in children with normal hearing. Possibly, tinnitus in young children correlates with stress as in adolescents and adults.

  • 42.
    Karlsson, Katarina
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science.
    ”Jag är rädd, jag vill till mamma”: Yngre barns, föräldrars och sjuksköterskors levda erfarenheter av nålprocedurer i vården2015Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: The overall aim of the thesis is to create knowledge about what it means for younger children to undergo needle-related medical procedures (NRMPs), and what caring support in relation to this means based on nurses’, parents’, and younger children's perspectives.

    Methods: The first and second papers used descriptive phenomenological analysis to describe the meanings of supporting younger children during NRMPs from the perspective of nurses (Ι) and parents(ΙΙ). The third and fourth papers used lifeworld hermeneutic analysis to explain and understand the consequences related to NRMPs (ΙΙΙ) and support (ΙV) during these procedures from younger children’s perspectives. Data has been collected by participant observations and lifeworld interviews documented by video-recorded observations, field notes, and audio-recorded interviews. In total 60 people participated, fourteen nurses, twenty-five parents, and twenty-one children.

    Main results: The results show that an important consequence for children of procedures with needles is experiences of fear. The child's fear affects how the child is able to manage the procedure and the support the child gets from adults is crucial to whether the child's fear increases or decreases.

    The support consists of giving support or receiving support. Parents support the child by safeguarding and protecting the child during the needle-related procedure; they “keep the child under the protection of their wings,” sometimes very close and sometimes a little further out under the wingtips. Nurses support the child by starting from individual child’s experiences and needs; they "balance on a tightrope" in an unpredictable situation. In the meeting between the child, the parents, and the nurses, the adults are guided by the child in what forms of support are provided. This continues until the needle-related medical procedure is completed and the child can walk proud and strong from the procedure with a feeling that "I can handle this.”

    Conclusions: Children’s need for support during needle-related medical procedures is primarily tied to children’s experiences of fear. For the child to experience a caring support, adults need to understand children’s experiences of fear as well as children’s need for support and what form the support should take. A caring support develops dialectically between children and adults in a circular movement. In such a dialectic, the child guides the adult and vice versa. That children have the capability of guiding adults during needle-related medical procedures shows that they are active and participating. Here it becomes clear that there is no objective location of the phenomenon of support. Support can therefore only be studied as a lived experience of those who need it.

  • 43.
    Karlsson, Katarina
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Rydström, Ingela
    University of Borås, Sweden.
    Nyström, Maria
    University of Borås, Sweden.
    Enskär, Karin
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Dalheim Englund, Ann-Charlotte
    University of Borås, Sweden.
    Consequences of needle-related medical procedures: A hermeneutic study with young children (3–7 years)2016In: Journal of Pediatric Nursing: Nursing Care of Children and Families, ISSN 0882-5963, E-ISSN 1532-8449, Vol. 31, no 2, p. e109-e118Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Needle-related medical procedures (NRMPs) are often frightening and cause children anxiety and pain. Only a few studies have examined the perspectives of younger children. More knowledge is needed about younger children's experiences in caring situations such as NRMPs.

    Aim

    The aim of this study was to explain and understand the consequences related to NRMPs from younger children's perspectives.

    Methods

    Participant observations and interviews with younger children who had experienced NRMPs were analysed using a lifeworld hermeneutic approach.

    Results

    Experiencing fear is central for younger children during an NRMP and interpretation of its consequences formed the basis for the following themes: seeking security, realizing the adult's power, struggling for control, feeling ashamed, and surrendering. A comprehensive understanding is presented wherein younger children's experiences of NRMPs vary across time and space related to weakening and strengthening their feelings of fear.

    Conclusions

    Awareness is needed that adults' power becomes more obvious for children during an NRMP. Children's surrender does not necessarily imply acceptance of the procedure. Providing children with opportunities to control elements of the procedure creates a foundation for active participation, and vice versa.

  • 44.
    Lygnegård, Frida
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Behavioural Science and Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Almqvist, Lena
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD. Mälardalen University.
    Granlund, Mats
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Behavioural Science and Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Huus, Karina
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Participation profiles in domestic life and peer relations as experienced by adolescents with and without impairments and long-term health conditions2018In: Developmental Neurorehabilitation, ISSN 1751-8423, E-ISSN 1751-8431Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PURPOSE: To investigate how individual and environmental factors relate to self-reported participation profiles in adolescents with and without impairments or long-term health conditions.

    METHODS: A person-oriented approach (hierarchical cluster analysis) was used to identify cluster groups of individuals sharing participation patterns in the outcome variables frequency perceived importance in domestic life and peer relations. Cluster groups were compared using one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA).

    RESULTS: A nine-cluster solution was chosen. All clusters included adolescents with impairment and long-term health conditions. Perceived importance of peer relations was more important than frequent attendance in domestic-life activities. Frequency of participation in dialogues and family interaction patterns seemed to affect the participation profiles more than factors related to body functions.

    CONCLUSION: Type of impairment or long-term health condition is a weaker determinant of membership in clusters depicting frequency and perceived importance in domestic life or peer relations than dialogue and family environment.

  • 45.
    Mahdi, Soheil
    et al.
    Division of Neuropsychiatry, Department of Women’s and Children’s Health, Center of Neurodevelopmental Disorders (KIND), CAP Research Center, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Ronzano, Nadia
    Child and Adolescent Neuropsychiatric Unit, Department of Biomedical Science, University of Cagliari, Italy.
    Knüppel, Ane
    Research Unit for Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Aalborg University Hospital, Aalborg, Denmark.
    Dias, José Carlos
    Childhood and Adolescence Psychiatry Department, Oporto Hospital Centre, Porto, Portugal.
    Albdah, Ayman
    Child Psychiatry Division, King Abdullah Specialist Children Hospital, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia.
    Chien-Ho, Lin
    Department of Psychiatry, Chimei Medical Center, Tainan, Taiwan.
    Almodayfer, Omar
    Mental Health Department, KAMC-R, MNGHA, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia.
    Bluschke, Annet
    Cognitive Neurophysiology, Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Faculty of Medicine, Technical University, Dresden, Germany.
    Karande, Sunil
    Learning Disability Clinic, Department of Paediatrics, Seth GS Medical College and KEM Hospital, Parel, India.
    Huang, Huei-Lin
    Institute of Behavioral Medicine, Institute of Clinical Medicine, Department of Psychiatry, National Chen Kung University Hospital, College of Medicine, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan, Taiwan.
    Christiansen, Hanna
    Department of Clinical Child and Adolescent Psychology, Philipps University Marburg, Marburg, Germany.
    Granlund, Mats
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Behavioural Science and Social Work.
    de Vries, Petrus J.
    Division of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, University of Cape Town, Cape Town, South Africa.
    Coghill, David
    Departments of Paediatrics and Psychiatry, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Australia.
    Tannock, Rosemary
    Research Institute of the Hospital for Sick Children, University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada.
    Rohde, Luis
    ADHD Outpatient Program, Hospital de Clínicas de Porto Alegre, Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, Brazil.
    Bölte, Sven
    Division of Neuropsychiatry, Department of Women’s and Children’s Health, Center of Neurodevelopmental Disorders (KIND), CAP Research Center, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    An international clinical study of ability and disability in ADHD using the WHO-ICF framework2018In: European Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, ISSN 1018-8827, E-ISSN 1435-165X, p. 1-15Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This is the fourth and final study designed to develop International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF, and children and youth version, ICF-CY) core sets for attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). To investigate aspects of functioning and environment of individuals with ADHD as documented by the ICF-CY in clinical practice settings. An international cross-sectional multi-centre study was applied, involving nine units from eight countries: Denmark, Germany, India, Italy, Portugal, Saudi Arabia, Sweden and Taiwan. Clinicians and clinical researchers rated the functioning level of 112 children, adolescents and adults with ADHD using the extended ICF-CY checklist version 2.1a. The ratings were based on a variety of information sources, such as medical records, medical history, clinical observations, clinical questionnaires, psychometric tests and structured interviews with participants and family members. In total, 113 ICF-CY categories were identified, of which 50 were related to the activities and participation, 33 to environmental factors and 30 to body functions. The clinical study also yielded strengths related to ADHD, which included temperament and personality functions and recreation and leisure. The study findings endorse the complex nature of ADHD, as evidenced by the many functional and contextual domains impacted in ADHD. ICF-CY based tools can serve as foundation for capturing various functional profiles and environmental facilitators and barriers. The international nature of the ICF-CY makes it possible to develop user-friendly tools that can be applied globally and in multiple settings, ranging from clinical services and policy-making to education and research. 

  • 46.
    Nilsson, John
    et al.
    Department of Paediatrics, Ryhov County Hospital, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Åkesson, Karin
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, The Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare. Futurum—Academy for Health and Care, Jönköping County Council .
    Hanberger, Lena
    Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Samuelsson, Ulf
    Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Paediatrics and Diabetes Research Centre, Linköping University Hospital, Linköping, Sweden.
    High HbA1c at onset cannot be used as a predictor for future metabolic control for the individual child with type 1 diabetes mellitus.2017In: Pediatric Diabetes, ISSN 1399-543X, E-ISSN 1399-5448, Vol. 18, no 8, p. 848-852Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: To study how metabolic control at onset of type 1 diabetes correlates to metabolic control and clinical parameters during childhood until transition from pediatric care to adult diabetes care.

    MATERIALS AND METHODS: Data at onset, three months, one, three, and five years after diagnosis and at transition, on HbA1c and clinical parameters, on 8084 patients in the Swedish pediatric quality registry, SWEDIABKIDS, were used. Of these patients, 26% had been referred to adult diabetes care by 2014.

    RESULTS: Children with HbA1c < 72 mmol/mol (8.7%) (20% of patients, low group) at diagnosis continued to have good metabolic control during childhood, in contrast to children with HbA1c > 114 mmol/mol (12.6%) (20% of patients, high group) at diagnosis, who continued to have high HbA1c at follow-up. For the individual, there was no significant correlation between high HbA1c at onset and during follow-up. During follow-up, children in the high group were more often smokers, less physically active, and more often had retinopathy than children in the low group (P < .01, .01, .03 respectively).

    CONCLUSION: High HbA1c at onset was associated with high HbA1c during follow-up on a group level, but it cannot be used as a predictor of future metabolic control on an individual level. These results emphasize the important work done by the diabetes team in the first years after diagnosis. It is important to continuously set high goals for the achievement of tight metabolic control, in order to decrease the risk of microvascular complications.

  • 47.
    Norderyd, Johanna
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    A biopsychosocial approach to functioning, oral health and specialist dental health care in children with disabilities – Swedish and international perspectives2017Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: Maintaining good oral health may be more important for children with disabilities than others, since problems with oral health may increase the impact of a disability, or the medical condition may increase the risk for poor oral health. In addition, the risk for oral health problems may be influenced by the functioning of the child. Functioning can also affect the child’s ability to cooperate in the dental setting, and how dental treatment is performed. A medical diagnosis alone does not provide enough information about a child’s functioning, nor oral health. Thus, there is a need for a holistic perspective of oral health and dental health care in children with disabilities. The International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health - Children and Youth (ICF-CY) enables a structured assessment of the biopsychosocial consequences of a health condition.

    Aim: The overall aim of this thesis was to investigate how biopsychosocial factors relate to oral health and specialist dental health care in children with disabilities in a Swedish, and an international context, with special focus on the experience of dental treatment under general anaesthesia (DGA).

    Material and methods: The research was conducted using a quantitative, cross-sectional, comparative and descriptive design. An ICF-CY Checklist for Oral Health was completed with data from a structured interview with children 0-16 years old, referred for specialist dental health care, and their parents/carers. Additional information was retrieved from dental and medical records. Three groups were included in data analyses: one large international group of 218 children from Argentina, France, Ireland and Sweden; one large Swedish group with 99 children with complex disabilities; and one international group of children with disabilities and manifest dental caries from Argentina, France and Sweden.

    Results: The ICF-CY Checklist for Oral Health identified both common and varying functional, social and environmental aspects relevant for oral health and oral health care in children who had been referred to specialist dental clinics in four countries. Swedish children with caries experience had been referred to a paediatric dental specialist clinic at a significantly older age than caries-free children. The medical diagnoses were not significantly related to dental caries or child functioning in the large Swedish group with complex disabilities and low caries prevalence, nor was there a significant relationship between dental caries and child functioning. Collinearity between dental caries and problems in the functioning factor ’Interpersonal interactions andrelationships’ was observed in the international group of children with disabilities and manifest dental caries. DGA sessions with combined medical and dental treatment were common in the large Swedish study group. Children with experience of DGA had more severe problems in intellectual functions than those without experience of DGA. Problems in interpersonal interactions and relationships increased, while problems with mobility decreased, the likelihood for children having had experience of DGA. On international group level, dmft/DMFT was significantly higher in children with the experience of DGA than in those without DGA experience, but looking at Argentina, France and Sweden separately, this was not true for the Swedish children. There were significant, international differences between the prevalence of dmft/DMFT, DGA and environmental barriers.

    Conclusion: The biopsychosocial perspective, operationalised by the ICF-CY, contributes a holistic view on oral health and specialist dental health care in children with disabilities. In addition to certain differences, children with different health status from different countries share many functional and environmental aspects, important for oral health and dental health care. Early referral to a paediatric specialist dental clinic seemed favourable for oral health. The medical diagnosis was not related to child functioning or dental caries. Child functioning had a significant impact on DGA, and in children with disabilities and manifest dental caries, child functioning also had a correlation with caries. The dental caries burden was a stronger factor than functioning for the experience of DGA, however, dental health organisation and country context seemed to matter the most. Combining dental and medical procedures during the same GA session is good use of resources for both the individual and the society. To ensure children with complex disabilities to have the possibility of achieving equivalent good oral health as other children, DGA is one important factor.

  • 48.
    Norderyd, Johanna
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Faulks, D.
    Molina, G.
    Granlund, Mats
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Behavioural Science and Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Klingberg, G.
    What determines dental caries treatment under general anaesthesia in children with disabilities: number of cavities, child functioning or dental organisation?Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 49.
    Norderyd, Johanna
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. National Oral Disability Centre for Rare Disorders, The Institute for Postgraduate Dental Education, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Faulks, Denise
    CHU Clermont-Ferrand, Service d'Odontologie, Clermont-Ferrand, France.
    Molina, Gustavo
    Facultad de Odontología, Universidad Nacional de Córdoba, Cordoba, Argentina.
    Granlund, Mats
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Behavioural Science and Social Work.
    Klingberg, Gunilla
    Departement of Pediatric Dentistry, Faculty of Odontology, Malmö University, Malmö, Sweden.
    Which factors most influence referral for restorative dental treatment under sedation and general anaesthesia in children with complex disabilities: Caries severity, child functioning or dental service organisation?2018In: International Journal of Paediatric Dentistry, ISSN 0960-7439, E-ISSN 1365-263X, Vol. 28, no 1, p. 71-82Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    The UN Convention on the Rights of the Child gives all children right to the highest standard of services for treatment and rehabilitation. For children with disabilities, sedation and general anaesthesia (GA) are often indicated for dental treatment; however, accessibility to this varies. The International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health – Child and Youth version (ICF-CY) enables a biopsychosocial description of children undergoing dental treatment.

    Aim

    To investigate conscious sedation and GA in children with complex disabilities and manifest caries and analyse how caries, child functioning, and dental service organisation relate to dental GA (DGA), comparing Argentina, France, and Sweden using the ICF-CY.

    Design

    Quantitative, cross-sectional; data collected through structured interviews, observation, and dental records.

    Results

    Sedation and DGA were common. Children with limitations in interpersonal interactions and relationships were more likely to have had DGA (OR: 5.3, P = 0.015). Level of caries experience was strongly correlated with experience of DGA. There were significant differences between countries regarding caries prevalence, sedation, DGA, and functional and environmental factors.

    Conclusions

    Although caries experience and child functioning are important, dental health service organisation had the most impact on the incidence of DGA, and for the use of conscious sedation, for children with complex disabilities.

  • 50.
    Olsson, Cecilia
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Department of Health Sciences, Karlstad, Sweden.
    Björk, Maria
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science.
    Ringnér, Anders
    Umeå University, Department of Nursing, Umeå, Sweden.
    The Pediatric Inventory for Parents - Swedish Translation and Psychometric Testing.2018In: Journal of Pediatric Nursing: Nursing Care of Children and Families, ISSN 0882-5963, E-ISSN 1532-8449, article id S0882-5963(17)30305-6Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Pediatric Inventory for Parents (PIP) measures parental stress related to caring for a child with an illness. However, no Swedish translation is available.

    PURPOSE: This study reports a Swedish translation of the PIP and psychometric properties of the instrument.

    DESIGN AND METHODS: This is a descriptive/methodological paper. The PIP was translated and culturally adapted to Swedish, and comprehensibility was tested. Data were collected twice from 48 parents of children with different illnesses, and initial psychometric properties of the instrument were examined. The IES-R (Impact of Event Scale-Revised) was used for concurrent validity.

    RESULTS: The Swedish version of the PIP demonstrated good correlations with the IES-R, and temporal changes were similar. Endorsement frequencies and test-retest were also satisfactory. When comparing groups of parents, the parents of children with cancer were statistically significantly more distressed, both on total score and for emotional distress and role function. Discriminative validity was demonstrated by comparing parents of children with cancer with parents of children with other diseases.

    CONCLUSIONS: The Swedish version of the PIP seems to be a valid and reliable instrument. However, as we used relatively small sample, for the future, we suggest further testing with larger samples.

    PRACTICE IMPLICATIONS: Clinicians and researchers seeking to measure parental distress in chronic illness could use the Swedish version of the PIP.

12 1 - 50 of 68
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf