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  • 1. Abrahamsson, K. H.
    et al.
    Koch, G.
    Norderyd, Ola
    Institute for Postgraduate Dental Education, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Romao, C.
    Wennström, J. L.
    Periodontal conditions in a Swedish city population of adolescents: A cross-sectional study2006In: Swedish Dental Journal, ISSN 0347-9994, Vol. 30, no 1, p. 25-34Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this epidemiological survey was to analyze the periodontal conditions of 19-year old individuals in an urban area of Sweden, with special reference to gender and socioeconomic factors. A randomized sample of 272 individuals living in Göteborg, Sweden, was clinically examined with regard to oral hygiene, gingivitis, periodontal pockets, probing attachment loss (PAL) and gingival recession. Bitewing radiographs were used for assessments of alveolar bone level (ABL) and dental calculus. A questionnaire-based interview regarding oral hygiene habits was included. Data were analyzed with regard to differences between gender and socioeconomic grouping. The subjects showed a mean plaque score of 59% and a gingivitis score of 44%. 70% of the adolescents had a plaque score of ≥50%, whereas corresponding figure for gingivitis was 37%. 27% of the subjects had at least one tooth with gingival recession. The mean prevalence of sites with probing depth of ≥6 mm was 0.5, and the prevalence of PAL ≥2 mm was 0.7. A radiographic bone level of ≥2 mm was observed at on average 0.8 teeth per subject. Females had significantly less plaque and gingivitis than males and significantly higher number of teeth with gingival recession. There were no clinically significant differences in periodontal conditions between socioeconomic groups. In conclusion, the survey revealed higher prevalence of plaque and gingivitis among male than female adolescents but no differences between socioeconomic groups.

  • 2.
    Ahl, Magnus
    et al.
    Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, The Institute for Postgraduate Dental Education, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Marcusson, Agneta
    Maxillofacial Unit, and Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Ulander, Martin
    Department of Clinical Neurophysiology, Linköping University Hospital, Linköping, Sweden.
    Magnusson, Anders
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Centre for Oral Health. Department of Orthodontics, The Institute for Postgraduate Dental Education, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Cardemil, Carina
    Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Larsson, Pernilla
    Department of Prosthodontics, Faculty of Odontology, Malmö University, Malmö, Sweden.
    Translation and validation of the English-language instrument Orthognathic Quality of Life Questionair into Swedish2021In: Acta Odontologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-6357, E-ISSN 1502-3850, Vol. 79, no 1, p. 19-24Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: In orthognathic surgery, understanding the patient’s motives for treatment is a key factor for postoperative patient satisfaction and treatment success. In countries/systems where orthognathic surgery is funded by public means, patients are referred mainly due to functional problems, although studies of quality of life related changes after treatment indicate that psychosocial and aesthetic reasons might be equal or more important for the patient. There is no available validated condition specific instruments in the Swedish language for quality of life evaluation of patients with dentofacial deformities.

    Aims/objectives: Cross cultural translation and adaptation of the English-language instrument ‘Orthognathic Quality of Life Questionnaire’ (OQLQ) into Swedish.

    Methods: OQLQ was translated into Swedish. A total of 121 patients in four groups were recruited and the Swedish version of the OQLQ (OQLQ-S) was tested by psychometric methods. Reliability was assessed by internal consistency and test–retest reliability. Validity was evaluated by face, convergent and discriminant validity.

    Results/findings and conclusions: OQLQ-S is reliable and showed good construct validity and internal consistency and can be used in a Swedish speaking population as a complement to clinical variables to evaluate patients with dentofacial deformity. 

  • 3.
    Ahonen, Hanna
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dept. of Odontology and Oral Health Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Centre for Oral Health.
    The multifaceted concept of oral health: Studies on a Swedish general population and perspectives of persons with experience of long-term CPAP-treated obstructive sleep apnea2022Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Oral health is a multifaceted and changeable part of our overall health and well-being as it contributes to important everyday functions such as eating, talking, and conveying feelings. Our oral health can be affected by a range of determinants, one of which is obstructive sleep apnea [OSA] treated with continuous positive airway pressure [CPAP]. Even though xerostomia has been frequently reported upon, the possible relationship between oral health and CPAP-treated OSA is not clearly understood. The World Dental Federation [FDI] recently proposed a definition and theoretical framework of oral health, intended to be globally applicable and to move dentistry toward a more promotive approach. By using the FDI’s framework as a basis for exploration, studies in a general population can increase the understanding of different aspects of oral health and set the frame of reference for whether and how CPAP-treated OSA can be experienced to affect a person’s oral health.

    The overall aim of this thesis was to gain a deeper understanding of how the FDI’s theoretical framework of oral health can be applied in a general population and how oral health is experienced in a specific population of persons with increased risk for adverse oral health.

    The FDI’s framework was explored with empirical data from a general population (N=630) and a population of persons with experience of CPAP-treated OSA (N=18). In papers I and II, the FDI framework was tested and evaluated with quantitative methods (principal component analysis and structural equation modeling), using cross-sectional data from the Jönköping studies. In papers III and IV, qualitative methods (directed content analysis and critical incident technique) were used where personal views and experiences were explored using individual semi-structured interviews.

    The findings in paper I showed that factors such as dental caries, periodontal disease, experience of xerostomia, and aesthetic satisfaction can be included in the FDI’s component the core elements of oral health. In paper II, driving determinants and moderating factors were found to have direct effects on all core elements of oral health except aesthetic satisfaction. Three of the core elements of oral health (oral health-related quality of life, aesthetic satisfaction, and xerostomia) had direct effects on the latent variable overall health and well-being. Driving determinants and moderating factors had no direct effect on overall health and well-being, and no indirect effects were found. In paper III, the study participants’ views on oral health determinants were described and could be categorized into all the FDI framework dimensions. The component driving determinants could include a range of determinants affecting a person’s oral health such as CPAP treatment, age, the influence of family and social surroundings, interdental cleaning, willingness to change when needed, and relationship with oral healthcare professionals. In paper IV, the study participants described both negative and positive experiences occurring with or without their CPAP. The negative experiences included increased xerostomia, pain or discomfort, tooth wear, and negative feelings. The positive experiences included decreased xerostomia and improved oral health habits due to improved sleep. Many of the difficulties could be managed by easily accessible facilitators. The experiences the study participants described could be included in all the FDI framework components.

    In conclusion, the FDI’s framework can be applied in a general population to describe different components of oral health, and is also useful to describe a person’s views and experiences of oral health in a specific population. CPAP treatment could be considered an oral health determinant as it can affect a person’s oral health. Both positive and negative experiences can contribute to CPAP adherence as negative experiences often can be successfully managed.

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  • 4.
    Ahonen, Hanna
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dept. of Odontology and Oral Health Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Centre for Oral Health.
    Broström, Anders
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dept. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT. Univ Hosp Linkoping, Dept Clin Neurophysiol, Linkoping, Sweden..
    Fransson, Eleonor I.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dept. of Natural Science and Biomedicine. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ARN-J (Aging Research Network - Jönköping). Jonkoping Univ, Sch Hlth & Welf, ADULT, Jonkoping, Sweden..
    Neher, Margit
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dept. of Rehabilitation. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, The Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare.
    Lindmark, Ulrika
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dept. of Natural Science and Biomedicine. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Centre for Oral Health. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ARN-J (Aging Research Network - Jönköping). Karlstad Univ, Dept Hlth Sci, Karlstad, Sweden..
    Oral health-related situations among patients with experience of continuous positive airway pressure treatment: a critical incident analysis of experiences and actions2022In: Journal of Sleep Research, ISSN 0962-1105, E-ISSN 1365-2869, Vol. 31, no Suppl 1, article id P085Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 5.
    Ahonen, Hanna
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT.
    Kvarnvik, Christine
    Folktandvården Region Jönköpings län.
    Broström, Anders
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Department of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT. Avdelningen för Klinisk Neurofysiologi, Linköpings Universitetssjukhus, Linköping.
    Fransson, Eleonor I.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Department of Clinical Diagnostics. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ARN-J (Aging Research Network - Jönköping). Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Inspektionen för Socialförsäkringen, Göteborg.
    Nygårdh, Annette
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Department of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, The Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. IMPROVE (Improvement, innovation, and leadership in health and welfare).
    Stensson, Malin
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Department of Clinical Diagnostics. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Centre for Oral Health. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Biomedical Platform.
    Lindmark, Ulrika
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Department of Clinical Diagnostics. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Centre for Oral Health. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ARN-J (Aging Research Network - Jönköping).
    Oral hälsa och obstruktiv sömnapné- protokoll för en longitudinell studie2019Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 6.
    Ahonen, Hanna
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT.
    Kvarnvik, Christine
    Broström, Anders
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Department of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT.
    Fransson, Eleonor I.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Department of Clinical Diagnostics. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ARN-J (Aging Research Network - Jönköping). Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology.
    Nygårdh, Annette
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Department of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, The Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. IMPROVE (Improvement, innovation, and leadership in health and welfare).
    Stensson, Malin
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Department of Clinical Diagnostics. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Centre for Oral Health. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Biomedical Platform.
    Norderyd, Ola
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Department of Clinical Diagnostics.
    Ulander, Martin
    Sunnergren, Ola
    Jansson, Henrik
    Sayardoust, Shariel
    Lindmark, Ulrika
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Department of Clinical Diagnostics. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Centre for Oral Health. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ARN-J (Aging Research Network - Jönköping).
    “No one seems to know”: Studieprotokoll för utvärdering av ett teoretiskt ramverk för oral hälsa avseende reliabilitet och validitet i en obstruktiv sömnapné population2019Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 7.
    Ahonen, Hanna
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Centre for Oral Health.
    Kvarnvik, Christine
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Centre for Oral Health. The Institute for Postgraduate Dental Education, Region Jönköping County, Jönköping, Sweden; Department of Endodontics, Periodontology and Prosthetics, Public Dental Health, Jönköping County Council, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Norderyd, Ola
    The Institute for Postgraduate Dental Education, Region Jönköping County, Jönköping, Sweden; Department of Endodontics, Periodontology and Prosthetics, Public Dental Health, Jönköping County Council, Jönköping, Sweden; Faculty of Odontology, Malmö University, Malmö, Sweden.
    Broström, Anders
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Department of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT. Department of Clinical Neurophysiology, University Hospital Linköping, Linköping, Sweden.
    Fransson, Eleonor I.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Department of Clinical Diagnostics. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Centre for Oral Health. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT.
    Lindmark, Ulrika
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Department of Clinical Diagnostics. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Centre for Oral Health. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ARN-J (Aging Research Network - Jönköping).
    Clinical and self-reported measurements to be included in the core elements of the World Dental Federation's theoretical framework of oral health2021In: International Dental Journal, ISSN 0020-6539, E-ISSN 1875-595X, Vol. 71, no 1, p. 53-62Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction

    Oral health is part of general health, and oral diseases share risk factors with several non-communicable diseases. The World Dental Federation (FDI) has published a theoretical framework illustrating the complex interactions between the core elements of oral health (CEOHs): driving determinants, moderating factors, and general health and well-being. However, the framework does not specify which self-reported or clinical measurements to be included in the CEOHs.

    Objectives

    To explore oral health measurements relevant for a general adult population to be included in the CEOHs in the FDI's theoretical framework of oral health.

    Materials and methods

    A psychometric study was performed, using cross-sectional data from Sweden (= 630, 54% women, mean age 49.7 years). The data set initially consisted of 186 self-reported and clinical measurements. To identify suitable measurements, the selection was discussed in different settings, including both experts and patients. Principal component analyses (PCAs) were performed to explore, reduce and evaluate measurements to be included in the three CEOHs. Internal consistency was estimated by Cronbach's Alpha.

    Results

    The validation process yielded 13 measurements (four clinical, nine self-reported) in concordance with the CEOHs. PCAs confirmed robust validity regarding the construction, predicting 60.85% of variance, representing psychosocial function (number of measurements = 5), disease and condition status (number of measurements = 4), and physiological function (number of measurements = 4). Cronbach's Alpha indicated good to sufficient internal consistency for each component in the constructs (a = 0.88, 0.68, 0.61, respectively).

    Conclusion

    In a Swedish general adult population, 13 self-reported and clinical measurements can be relevant to include to operationalise CEOHs in the FDI's theoretical framework.

  • 8.
    Ahonen, Hanna
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dept. of Odontology and Oral Health Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Centre for Oral Health.
    Neher, Margit
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dept. of Rehabilitation. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT.
    Fransson, Eleonor I.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dept. of Natural Science and Biomedicine. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ARN-J (Aging Research Network - Jönköping).
    Broström, Anders
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dept. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT. Department of Clinical Neurophysiology, University Hospital Linköping, Linköping, Sweden.
    Lindmark, Ulrika
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dept. of Natural Science and Biomedicine. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Centre for Oral Health. Department of Health Sciences, Karlstad University, Karlstad, Sweden.
    Views about oral health determinants as described by persons with continuous positive airway pressure-treated obstructive sleep apnea: A qualitative studyManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 9.
    Ahonen, Hanna
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Department of Odontology and Oral Health Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Centre for Oral Health.
    Neher, Margit
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Department of Rehabilitation. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, The Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare.
    Fransson, Eleonor I.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Department of Natural Science and Biomedicine. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ARN-J (Aging Research Network - Jönköping).
    Broström, Anders
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Department of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT. Department of Clinical Neurophysiology, University Hospital Linköping, Linköping, Sweden.
    Lindmark, Ulrika
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Department of Natural Science and Biomedicine. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Centre for Oral Health. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ARN-J (Aging Research Network - Jönköping). Department of Health Sciences, Karlstad University, Karlstad, Sweden.
    Views on oral health determinants as described by persons with continuous positive airway pressure-treated obstructive sleep apnoea: a qualitative study2023In: BMC Oral Health, ISSN 1472-6831, E-ISSN 1472-6831, Vol. 23, no 1, article id 407Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Oral diseases have been associated with cardiovascular diseases, and persons with continuous positive airway pressure [CPAP]-treated obstructive sleep apnoea [OSA] have an increased risk for negative consequences for both oral and general health. CPAP treatment is often life-long and adherence to treatment is essential. Xerostomia is a common side-effect which can lead to treatment abandonment. Oral health is a changeable part of our general health and well-being and exploring the views of oral health determinants from persons with experience of CPAP-treatment is important to prevent adverse oral health outcomes. The purpose of this study was to explore what persons with experience of CPAP-treated OSA view as determinants for their oral health.

    METHODS: Eighteen persons with long-term experience of CPAP-treated OSA were purposively selected. Data were collected by semi-structured individual interviews. A code book based on the World Dental Federation's [FDI] theoretical framework for oral health was developed and used to analyse the data using directed content analysis. The domains in the framework's component driving determinants were used as pre-determined categories. Using the description of driving determinants as a guide, meaning units were extracted from the interview transcripts through an inductive approach. Then, by employing a deductive approach the code book was used to categorise the meaning units into the pre-determined categories.

    FINDINGS: The views on oral health determinants described by the informants were compatible with the five domains in the component driving determinants in the FDI's theoretical framework. Ageing, heredity, and salivation (biological and genetic factors), influences from family and the wider society (social environment), location and re-localisation (physical environment), oral hygiene habits, motivation, willingness to change, professional support (health behaviours), and availability, control, finances, and trust (access to care) were viewed as important oral health determinants by the informants.

    CONCLUSION: The study points to a variety of individual oral health-related experiences that oral healthcare professionals could consider when designing interventions to reduce xerostomia and prevent adverse oral health outcomes for persons undergoing long-term CPAP-treatment.

  • 10.
    Ahonen, Hanna
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Centre for Oral Health.
    Pakpour, Amir H.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dept. of Nursing Science.
    Norderyd, Ola
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dept. of Natural Science and Biomedicine.
    Broström, Anders
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dept. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT.
    Fransson, Eleonor I.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dept. of Natural Science and Biomedicine. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ARN-J (Aging Research Network - Jönköping).
    Lindmark, Ulrika
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dept. of Natural Science and Biomedicine. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Centre for Oral Health. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ARN-J (Aging Research Network - Jönköping).
    Applying World Dental Federation Theoretical Framework for Oral Health in a General Population2022In: International Dental Journal, ISSN 0020-6539, E-ISSN 1875-595X, Vol. 72, no 4, p. 536-544Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: The World Dental Federation (FDI) has recently proposed a new definition and theoretical framework of oral health. The theoretical framework includes 4 main components and describes the relationships amongst them. In 2020, an international work group proposed the minimum Adult Oral Health Standard Set (AOHSS) of variables to measure oral health, which was mapped onto the FDI's theoretical framework. By using an empirical data set, the proposed variables in the AOHSS and the potential interactions amongst the components of the FDI's theoretical framework can be tested. The purpose of this research was to investigate structural relations of the components of the FDI's theoretical framework of oral health based on data from a general adult population.

    Methods: Data from a previously conducted Swedish cross-sectional study focusing on oral health were utilised (N = 630; women, 55.2%; mean age, 49.7 years [SD, 19.2]). Variable selection was guided by the AOHSS. Structural equation modeling was used to analyse relationships amongst the components of the FDI's theoretical model (core elements of oral health, driving determinants, moderating factors, and overall health and well-being).

    Results: The Oral Health Impact Profile (OHIP)-14, xerostomia, and aesthetic satisfaction had statistically significant direct effects on overall health and well-being (p < .05). Driving determinants and moderating factors had statistically significant direct effects on all core elements of oral health (p < .05) except aesthetic satisfaction (p = .616). The predictors explained 24.1% of the variance of the latent variable overall health and well-being. Based on several indices, the proposed model showed acceptable model fit.

    Conclusions: The FDI's theoretical framework can be used to describe different components of oral health and the relationship amongst them in an adult general population. Further research based on the FDI's theoretical framework in other populations and settings is needed to explore complex interactions and possible relationships that form oral health and to investigate other or additional important social determinants.

  • 11.
    Alabdalla, Ghazal
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare.
    Amairi, Rania
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare.
    Förekomst av parodontit bland vuxna med kranskärlssjukdom: Allmän litteraturstudie Examensarbete2022Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: The aim of this literary study is to investigate the incidence and causal factors of periodontitis among individuals ≥50 years of age with coronary heart disease. Method: The method used for this literary study was to search for original scientific articles in the databases CINAHL, DOSS and MEDLINE. Relevant keywords were used for the search in the databases with restriction for the selection with inclusion and exclusion criteria. Original scientific articles were quality reviewed, medium and high quality of the articles were included. Results: The study shows a link between periodontitis and coronary heart disease. The severity of periodontitis affects the onset and progression of coronary heart disease. Factors that affect disease development are the inflammatory process and its biomarkers (interleukins and adiponectin) as well as age and specific periodontal bacteria. Conclusion: The result of this literary study shows a connection between the occurrence of periodontitis and coronary heart disease. Common risk factors for the diseases that has been identified are the inflammatory process, inflammatory biomarkers, age and oral bacteria.

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  • 12. Aldasoki, Hanin
    et al.
    Jasseh, Awa
    Nyutexaminerade tandhygienisters upplevelse av introduktionsprogram2017Independent thesis Basic level (university diploma), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
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  • 13.
    Alm, A.
    et al.
    Kärnsjukhuset, Specialistklinken Pedodonti, Dept Paediat Dent, SE-54185 Skövde, Sweden.
    Wendt, Lill-Kari
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Oral health.
    Koch, G.
    Inst Postgrad Dent Educ, Dept Paediat Dent, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Birkhed, D.
    Gothenburg Univ, Dept Cardiol, Sahlgrenska Acad, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Nilsson, M.
    Cty Hosp, Futurum Acad Healthcare, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Caries in adolescence - influence from early childhood2012In: Community Dentistry and Oral Epidemiology, ISSN 0301-5661, E-ISSN 1600-0528, Vol. 40, no 2, p. 125-133Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To analyse the relationship between caries determinants in early childhood and caries prevalence in proximal surfaces in adolescents at the age of 15 years. Methods: The present longitudinal study is part of a series of surveys of oral health in 671 children followed from 1 to 15 years of age. Data were selected from examinations, interviews and questionnaires at 1, 3 and 6 years and bitewing radiographs at 15 years of age. Uni- and multivariable logistic regression analyses were performed to identify caries-related determinants. The outcome variable was carious lesions and fillings (DFa) in approximal tooth surfaces at 15 years of age. Statistical comparisons were made between caries-free teenagers, DFa = 0 and teenagers with DFa > 0, DFa 4 and DFa 8, respectively. Results: In the final logistic regression analyses, caries experience at 6 years and mother's self-estimation of her oral health care as being less good to poor remained statistically significant and were related to caries in all three caries groups (i.e. DF > 0, 4 and 8) at 15 years of age. The consumption of sweets at 1 year remained statistically significant, with a caries experience of DF 4 and 8. The variables 'parents born abroad' and female gender were statistically significantly associated with DFa 4 and DFa 8, respectively. Furthermore, infrequent toothbrushing habits at 3 years of age and failure to attend the examination at 1 year were statistically significantly associated with caries at 15 years in the univariable analyses. Conclusion: Early caries experience, consumption of sweets at an early age and mother's self-estimation of her oral health care as being less good to poor are associated with approximal caries in adolescents. The study indicates that caries determinants identified during early childhood have a strong impact on approximal caries in adolescence.

  • 14. Alm, Anita
    et al.
    Fåhraeus, Christina
    Wendt, Lill-Kari
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Oral health.
    Koch, Göran
    Andersson-Gäre, Boel
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Quality improvements, innovations and leadership in health care and social work.
    Birkhed, Dowen
    Body adiposity status in teenagers and snacking habits in early childhood in relation to approximal caries at 15 years of age2008In: International Journal of Paediatric Dentistry, ISSN 0960-7439, E-ISSN 1365-263X, Vol. 18, no 3, p. 189-196Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: The prevalence of overweight and obesity in children is steadily increasing in many countries. Dental caries and obesity are both multifactorial diseases and are associated with dietary habits.

    OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between body weight status in adolescents and snacking habits in early childhood to approximal caries prevalence at 15 years of age.

    METHODS: This study is part of a series of surveys of oral health in children followed from the ages of 1 year to 15 years. Body adiposity status was estimated at 13.5-16.4 years using the International Obesity Task Force cut-off values [age-specific body mass index (isoBMI)]. Information about snacking habits in early childhood was collected from interviews conducted at 1 year and 3 years. Approximal caries information was obtained from bitewing radiographs at 15 years. Data related to isoBMI and approximal caries were available in 402 teenagers.

    RESULT: Adolescents with isoBMI > or = 25 (n = 64) had an approximal caries prevalence that was a mean of 1.6 times higher than those with isoBMI < 25 (n = 338) (4.64 vs. 2.94; P = 0.014). Furthermore, children's snacking habits at an early age were associated with approximal caries at 15 years.

    CONCLUSION: Overweight and obese adolescents had more approximal caries than normal-weight individuals. Moreover, the frequent consumption of snacking products during early childhood appears to be a risk indicator for caries at 15 years. Future preventive programmes should therefore include, on a multidisciplinary level, strategies to prevent and reduce both obesity and dental caries at an early age.

  • 15. Alm, Anita
    et al.
    Isaksson, Helen
    Fåhraeus, Christina
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Centre for Oral Health.
    Koch, Göran
    Andersson-Gäre, Boel
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Quality improvements, innovations and leadership in health care and social work. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, The Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare.
    Nilsson, Mats
    Birkhed, Dowen
    Wendt, Lill-Kari
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Centre for Oral Health.
    BMI status in Swedish children and young adults in relation to caries prevalence: BMI and caries prevalence2011In: Swedish Dental Journal, ISSN 0347-9994, Vol. 35, no 1, p. 1-8Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Overweight and obesity are increasing as health problems at global level. Dental caries and obesity are both multifactorial diseases and are associated with dietary habits. The aim of the present study was to investigate the relationship between body weight status and caries prevalence in an unselected population followed from pre-school years to young adulthood. The present investigation was designed as a longitudinal analysis of the association between overweight/obesity and dental caries in one population at 3, 6, 15 and 20 years of age. The result shows that adolescents (15 years) and young adults (20 years) who are overweight/obese had a statistically significantly higher caries prevalence than normal-weight young people. At 6 years of age, the odds (OR) of having caries among obese children are 2.5 times higher than the odds for caries among six-year-old children of normal weight (p = 0.04). At 3 years of age, no association between overweight/obesity and caries was found. To conclude, overweight and obese adolescents and young adults had more caries than normal-weight individuals. The present study emphasises the need for multidisciplinary approaches to change the lifestyle factors causing both overweight/obesity and dental caries.

  • 16. Alm, Anita
    et al.
    Wendt, Lill-Kari
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Oral health.
    Koch, Göran
    Birkhed, Dowen
    Oral hygiene and parent-related factors during early childhood in relation to approximal caries at 15 years of age2008In: Caries Research, ISSN 0008-6568, E-ISSN 1421-976X, Vol. 42, no 1, p. 28-36Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 17.
    Anastassaki, Alkisti
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Behavioural Science and Social Work.
    Öster, Anders
    Helkimo, Martti
    Magnusson, Tomas
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Oral health.
    Globus pharyngeus: Litteraturöversikt och jämförande studie av två patientgrupper1996In: Tandläkartidningen, ISSN 0039-6982, Vol. 88, no 7, p. 404-409Article, review/survey (Other academic)
  • 18.
    Andersson, Bengt-Åke
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Biomedical Platform. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Centre for Oral Health. Department of Laboratory Medicine, Ryhov County Hospital, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Sayardoust, Shariel
    Department of Periodontology, Institute for Postgraduate Dental Education, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Löfgren, Sture
    Department of Laboratory Medicine, Ryhov County Hospital, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Rutqvist, Lars Erik
    Scientific Affairs Group, Swedish Match AB, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Laytragoon-Lewin, Nongnit
    Department of Laboratory Medicine, Ryhov County Hospital, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Cigarette smoking affects microRNAs and inflammatory biomarkers in healthy individuals and an association to single nucleotide polymorphisms is indicated2019In: Biomarkers, ISSN 1354-750X, E-ISSN 1366-5804, Vol. 24, no 2, p. 180-185Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Cigarette smoke induces inflammation and remodels immune response. Genetic and epigenetic alterations might be involved in the pathogenesis of smoking related diseases. In this study, we investigated the effect of smoking on systemic inflammation biomarkers and epigenetic changes at microRNA (miRNA) expression level. We also examined if the levels of inflammatory biomarkers were associated with selected single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs).

    METHOD: From 39 smokers and 101 non-smokers, levels of total white blood cells (WBCs) and its subpopulations, plasma cytokines/chemokines/proteins and miRNAs were analysed. For three biomarkers, C-reactive protein (CRP), MCP-1 and IFN-γ that were affected by smoking, the influence of SNPs was analyzed.

    RESULT: Elevated levels of total WBCs, neutrophils, monocytes, lymphocytes, CRP, MCP-1, IFN-γ and lower levels of miR-21 were detected in smokers. The elevated levels of IFN-γ in smokers was only statistically significantly associated with rs2069705 AG/GG SNP-genotype.

    CONCLUSIONS: A lower level of oncomir miRNA-21 and a higher level of immune modelling cytokine IFN-γ detected in smokers could be a protective immune response to cigarette smoke. The higher level of IFN-γ in smokers with a specific SNP genotype also suggests that a genetic interaction with smoking might predict the pathobiology of smoking related disease.

  • 19.
    Andersson, Ida
    et al.
    Jönköping University.
    Teow, Lilly
    Jönköping University.
    Oral hälsa hos barn med Downs syndrom: En litteraturöversikt2018Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
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  • 20.
    Angarita-Diaz, Maria P.
    et al.
    Univ Cooperat Colombia, Sch Dent, Dept Hlth Sci, Villavicencio Campus, Bogota, Colombia..
    Simon-Soro, Aurea
    Fdn Promot Hlth & Biomed Res, Dept Hlth & Genom, Valencia, Spain..
    Forero, Diana
    Univ Cooperat Colombia, Sch Dent, Dept Hlth Sci, Villavicencio Campus, Bogota, Colombia..
    Balcazar, Felipe
    Univ Cooperat Colombia, Sch Dent, Dept Hlth Sci, Villavicencio Campus, Bogota, Colombia..
    Sarmiento, Luisa
    Univ Cooperat Colombia, Sch Dent, Dept Hlth Sci, Villavicencio Campus, Bogota, Colombia..
    Romero, Erika
    Univ Cooperat Colombia, Sch Dent, Dept Hlth Sci, Villavicencio Campus, Bogota, Colombia..
    Mira, Alex
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Centre for Oral Health. Department of Health and Genomics, Foundation for the Promotion of Health and Biomedical Research, Valencia, Spain.
    Evaluation of possible biomarkers for caries risk in children 6 to 12 years of age2021In: Journal of Oral Microbiology, ISSN 2000-2297, E-ISSN 2000-2297, Vol. 13, no 1, article id 1956219Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Electrolytes, proteins, and other salivary molecules play an important role in tooth integrity and can serve as biomarkers associated with caries.

    Objective: To determine the concentration of potential biomarkers in children without caries (CF) and children with caries (CA).

    Methods: Unstimulated saliva was collected, and the biomarkers quantified in duplicate, using commercial Enzyme Linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA) kits to determine IgA, fibronectin, cathelicidin LL-37, and statherin levels, as well as colorimetric tests to detect formate and phosphate.

    Results: Significantly higher concentrations of statherin was detected in the CF group (Median: 94,734.6; IQR: 92,934.6-95,113.7) compared to the CA2 group (90,875.0; IQR: 83,580.2-94,633.4) (p = 0.03). Slightly higher median IgA (48,250.0; IQR: 31,461.9-67,418.8) and LL-37 levels (56.1; IQR 43.6-116.2) and a lower concentration of formate were detected in the CF group (0.02; IQR 0.0034-0.15) compared to the group with caries (IgA: 37,776.42; IQR: 33,383.9-44,128.5; LL-37: 46.3; IQR: 40.1011-67.7; formate: 0.10; IQR: 0.01-0.18), but these differences were not statistically significant.

    Conclusion: The fact that these compounds have been identified as good markers for caries among European adults highlights the difficulty of identifying universal biomarkers that are applicable to all ages or to different populations.

  • 21.
    Angelhoff, Charlotte
    et al.
    Crown Princess Victoria’s Child and Youth Hospital, and Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Faresjö, Tomas
    Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Community Medicine, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Sundell, Anna Lena
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Centre for Oral Health. Department of Pediatric Dentistry, Institute for Postgraduate Dental Education, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Measuring hair cortisol concentration, insomnia symptoms and quality of life in preschool children with severe early childhood caries–a case-control pilot study2023In: Acta Odontologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-6357, E-ISSN 1502-3850, Vol. 81, no 7, p. 508-516Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: This study aimed to 1) investigate the relationships between hair cortisol concentration (HCC), insomnia symptoms, Health-Related Quality of Life (HRQoL) and Oral Health-Related Quality of Life (OHRQoL) in preschool children with severe early childhood caries, 2) compare HCC, insomnia symptoms, HRQoL and OHRQoL in preschool children with severe early childhood caries with these factors in children without clinical signs of dental caries, and 3) explore correlations between caries scores and HCC, insomnia symptoms, HRQoL and OHRQoL.

    Material and Methods: A case-control pilot study, including 12 children with severe early childhood caries and 28 controls, aged 3-5 years. Dental examination was performed and hair samples for cortisol were taken. Parents filled out questionnaires about their child’s insomnia symptoms, HRQoL and OHRQoL. Interpreters were used in families with language difficulties.

    Results: The key findings in this pilot study were tendencies that children with severe early childhood caries had more insomnia symptoms, and poorer OHRQoL than the controls. Caries scores was correlated with insomnia symptoms and OHRQoL.

    Conclusions: Dentists should include questions about the child’s sleep when they see the child, as insomnia related to dental caries may lead to several physical, mental, and social problems.

  • 22.
    Backlund, Caroline
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Centre for Oral Health.
    Gunnarsson, Cajsa
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Centre for Oral Health.
    Knowlegde, attitude and behavior regarding oral health among children and adolescents, in Vietnam and Sweden: A literature review2020Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Vietnam, being a developing country does not have the same economic means to put into dental care as a country like Sweden. Knowledge, attitude and behavior are determining factors for oral health. The AIM of this literature study´s was therefore to evaluate knowledge, attitude and behavior regarding oral health among children and adolescents, in Vietnam and Sweden. METHOD:A literature review was made using the databases DOSS, MEDLINE and CINAHL. Twelve articles were included for the review. RESULTS: Bleeding gum was known, by one-third of the Vietnamese children and adolescents, to be a clinical sign of gingivitis. In Sweden the knowledge varied between 75-83%. In both Vietnam and Sweden, shiny and white teeth were mentioned to be important. The frequency of toothbrushing twice a day or more was reported from 40% to 68% among the participants in Vietnam. In Sweden, it varied from 73% to 82%. The highest percentage of children who consumed sweets daily or more frequent was 59,7% in Vietnam respectively 2-6% in Sweden. CONCLUSION: Knowledge about oral health was lacking and behavior could be seen to be inadequate. The attitude towards oral health is more focused on appearance than on the aspect of health.

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  • 23.
    Bafadhl, Abdurahman
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Centre for Oral Health.
    Gashi, Berat
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Centre for Oral Health.
    Oral hälsa hos prematurt födda barn2020Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: The aim of the literature study was to study the occurrence of dental hypomineralization (MIH), plaque and caries in prematurely born children in the primary and permanent dentition. Method: The study was a literature study. Four databases were used, MEDLINE, DOSS, CINAHL and PubMed, to find relevant articles for the study. A total of 14 articles were included according to the inclusion and exclusion criteria. Results: Two out of four studies showed that prematurely born children have an increased risk for MIH-affected teeth than full-term children. In common, the findings from the studies showed a higher amount of plaque was found in preterm children compared to control groups. The majority of the studies did not find a statistically significant difference between premature children and full-term children in dental caries prevalence. Conclusion: Premature birth can lead to higher incidence of plaque and dental hypomineralization. A higher incidence of caries in preterm children could not be established.  Increased knowledge of these complications is important for being able to treat prematurely born children in a professional manner. More research is needed on the relationship between prematurely born children and caries.

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  • 24.
    Bankvall, M.
    et al.
    Department of Dental Medicine, Karolinska Institute, Huddinge, Sweden.
    Carda-Diéguez, M.
    Department of Health and Genomics, Center for Advanced Research in Public Health, FISABIO Foundation, Valencia, Spain.
    Mira, Alex
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Centre for Oral Health. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dept. of Natural Science and Biomedicine.
    Karlsson, A.
    Nanoxis Consulting AB, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Hasséus, B.
    Department of Oral Medicine and Pathology, Institute of Odontology, The Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Karlsson, R.
    Clinical microbiology, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Robledo-Sierra, J.
    Faculty of Dentistry, CES University, Medellin, Colombia.
    Metataxonomic and metaproteomic profiling of the oral microbiome in oral lichen planus: a pilot study2023In: Journal of Oral Microbiology, ISSN 2000-2297, E-ISSN 2000-2297, Vol. 15, no 1, article id 2161726Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: A growing body of evidence demonstrates a different bacterial composition in the oral cavity of patients with oral lichen planus (OLP).

    Patients and methods: Buccal swab samples were collected from affected and non-affected sites of six patients with reticular OLP and the healthy oral mucosa of six control subjects. 16S rRNA gene MiSeq sequencing and mass spectrometry-based proteomics were utilised to identify the metataxonomic and metaproteomic profiles of the oral microbiome in both groups.

    Results: From the metataxonomic analysis, the most abundant species in the three subgroups were Streptococcus oralis and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, accounting for up to 70% of the total population. Principal Coordinates Analysis showed differential clustering of samples from the healthy and OLP groups. ANCOM-BC compositional analysis revealed multiple species (including P. aeruginosa and several species of Veillonella, Prevotella, Streptococcus and Neisseria) significantly over-represented in the control group and several (including Granulicatella elegans, Gemella haemolysans and G. parahaemolysans) in patients with OLP. The metaproteomic data were generally congruent and revealed that several Gemella haemolysans-belonging peptidases and other proteins with inflammatory and virulence potential were present in OLP lesions.

    Conclusion: Our data suggest that several bacterial species are associated with OLP. Future studies with larger cohorts should be conducted to determine their role in the aetiology of OLP and evaluate their potential as disease biomarkers.

  • 25.
    Beluli, Haxhere
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare.
    Mohammed, Umalkhayr
    Samband mellan oral hälsorelaterad livskvalitet och tandblekning.: En allmän litteraturstudie.2021Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Relationship between oral health-related quality of life and teeth whitening

    Summary

    Aim: The aim of the study was to study the relationship between oral health-related quality of life and teeth whitening.

    Method: Literature Study. Scientific articles were searched in databases DOSS, PubMed and Medline with keyword combinations "Oral health-related quality of life" AND "teeth whitening" and "quality of life" AND "teeth whitening". The literature study included 13 quality-reviewed articles.

    Results: The thematic analysis resulted in three main themes and under each central main theme has several sub-theme identifiers. Main themes showed that there was a connection between oral health-related quality of life and teeth whitening: Aesthetic impact, Psychological impact and Pain impact. Teeth whitening led to reduced aesthetic anxiety, improved aesthetic self-perception, color change, reduced discomfort, improved self-confidence that had a positive effect on the oral health-related quality of life. On the other hand, teeth whitening could cause tooth sensitivity and soft tissue irritation, which had a negative effect on the oral health-related quality of life.

    Keywords: Bleaching, discolored teeth, quality of life , whiter teeth.

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  • 26.
    Berbic, Jasmina
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Oral health.
    Omeirat, Sara
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Oral health.
    Tandhygienisters användning av bildstöd vid möte med barnpatienter2016Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: The aim of the study was to evaluate the use of pictorial support among dental hygienists when meeting children in a dental environment. Method and material: A digital questionnaire with 15 questions was send out to all (102) actively working dental hygienists in the county of Jönköping. There were a total of 57 participants, 54 women and 3 men who answered the questionnaire. Results were presented with absolute and relative frequencies, mean value and Chi-square test. Results: There was an interest in using pictorial support among dental hygienists. All dental hygienists in special dental care used pictorial support. Among dental hygienists in public dental care 23.5% used pictorial support. Results showed that the majority of dental hygienists preferred using pictorial support on all children. There was no statistically significant difference between using pictorial support and the length of dental hygienist education, but participants who finished a three-year education used pictorial support more often. Conclusion: Pictorial support has found to be a useful tool in dental care, still there are dental hygienists that don’t use it. More knowledge and research are needed about pictorial support so the effect of augmentative and alternative communication can be evaluated.

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  • 27.
    Berg, Stig
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health.
    Äldre och åldrande: Om befolkningsutveckling, hälsa och sociala förhållanden i ett framtidsperspektiv1991In: Tandhälsotillståndet hos olika befolkningsgrupper i Sverige: sammanställning av consensuskonferens i Hook 9-11 april, 1991 / [ed] Anders Hugoson, Göran Koch, Gunilla Svensson, Solna: LIC Förlag , 1991, p. 180-192Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 28.
    Bergendal, Birgitta
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare. National Oral Disability Centre for Rare Disorders, The Institute for Postgraduate Dental Education, Jönköping, Sweden.
    McAllister, Anita
    CLINTEC, Division of Speech and Language Pathology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Orofacial function and monitoring of oral care in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis2017In: Acta Odontologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-6357, E-ISSN 1502-3850, Vol. 75, no 3, p. 179-185Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: The aim was to assess orofacial function and monitor oral care in patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) to maintain oral comfort and oral health.

    MATERIALS AND METHODS: A case series of 14 patients newly diagnosed with ALS accepted to participate in a quality improvement project. After initial examinations, baseline oral conditions were obtained and the patients were seen every 3 months. Nordic Orofacial Test-Screening (NOT-S) was used for evaluation of orofacial function.

    RESULTS: Patients were grouped according to initial symptoms in a bulbar group and a spinal group with eight and six patients, respectively. The mean age at diagnosis was 62.8 years. All were dentate with a mean of 26.7 natural teeth. Most patients had very good oral and dental conditions. As expected, orofacial functions were differently affected in the two groups; at initial NOT-S registration, the mean total score was 5.6 (range 3-8 domains) in the bulbar group and 0.7 (0-2 domains) in the spinal group. At final registration, the corresponding figures were 6.1 and 3.2. Oral and dental aids were introduced according to need.

    CONCLUSIONS: In the bulbar group, several orofacial functions became impaired at an early stage of disease development, and at final registrations many vital orofacial functions were severely compromised. The spinal group was less severely affected orally. However, all individuals irrespective of type of initial symptoms needed assistance in performing oral hygiene measures in the latter part of the disease period. Good oral health and oral comfort could be maintained in all participants and no other dental treatment was needed.

  • 29.
    Bergendal, Birgitta
    et al.
    Odontologiska Institutionen i Jönköping.
    Norderyd, Johanna
    Odontologiska Institutionen i Jönköping.
    Bågesund, Mats
    Center for Orthodontics and Paediatric Dentistry, Linköping, Sweden.
    Holst, Annalena
    Department of Paediatric Dentistry, Kalmar, Sweden.
    Signs and symptoms from ectodermal organs in young Swedish individuals with oligodontia2006In: International Journal of Paediatric Dentistry, ISSN 0960-7439, E-ISSN 1365-263X, Vol. 16, no 5, p. 320-326Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives. The aim was to assess signs and symptoms from other ectodermal organs in addition to teeth in young individuals with oligodontia and to establish the prevalence of oligodontia.

    Sample and methods.  Children born 1981–94 reported by dental teams in the Public Dental Service to have oligodontia were asked to participate in a clinical study. The examinations comprised a structured interview on symptoms from ectodermal organs, and testing of salivary secretion.

    Results.  One hundred and sixty-two individuals met the inclusion criteria, and 123 individuals (75·9%) participated in the clinical study. Half of the individuals had one to four signs or symptoms from ectodermal organs beside oligodontia. The most common sign was low salivary secretion. Twelve individuals (9·6%) with isolated oligodontia reported impaired function of the sweat glands, hair, or nails. The prevalence of oligodontia was 0·090%.

    Conclusions.  An early identification of individuals with oligodontia can be made in a majority of cases by checking that all permanent incisors have erupted at the age of 8 years. The validity in asking individuals about normal and abnormal function of ectodermal organs was found to be low. This indicates that there is a strong need to establish routine clinical criteria for dysplasia of ectodermal organs.

  • 30.
    Bergendal, Birgitta
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. National Oral Disability Centre for Rare Disorders, The Institute for Postgraduate Dental Education, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Norderyd, Johanna
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. National Oral Disability Centre for Rare Disorders, The Institute for Postgraduate Dental Education, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Zhou, Xiaolei
    Uppsala University, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Klar, Joakim
    Uppsala University, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Dahl, Niklas
    Uppsala University, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Abnormal primary and permanent dentitions with ectodermal symptoms predict WNT10A deficiency2016In: BMC Medical Genetics, E-ISSN 1471-2350, Vol. 17, no 1, article id 88Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: The WNT10A protein is critical for the development of ectodermal appendages. Variants in the WNT10A gene may be associated with a spectrum of ectodermal abnormalities including extensive tooth agenesis.

    METHODS: In seven patients with severe tooth agenesis we identified anomalies in primary dentition and additional ectodermal symptoms, and assessed WNT10A mutations by genetic analysis.

    RESULTS: Investigation of primary dentition revealed peg-shaped crowns of primary mandibular incisors and three individuals had agenesis of at least two primary teeth. The permanent dentition was severely affected in all individuals with a mean of 21 missing teeth. Primary teeth were most often present in positions were succedaneous teeth were missing. Furthermore, most existing molars had taurodontism. Light, brittle or coarse hair was reported in all seven individuals, hyperhidrosis of palms and soles in six individuals and nail anomalies in two individuals. The anomalies in primary dentition preceded most of the additional ectodermal symptoms. Genetic analysis revealed that all seven individuals were homozygous or compound heterozygous for WNT10A mutations resulting in C107X, E222X and F228I.

    CONCLUSIONS: We conclude that tooth agenesis and/or peg-shaped crowns of primary mandibular incisors, severe oligodontia of permanent dentition as well as ectodermal symptoms of varying severity may be predictors of bi-allelic WNT10A mutations of importance for diagnosis, counselling and follow-up.

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  • 31.
    Berggren, Kristina
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Centre for Oral Health. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Department of Natural Science and Biomedicine.
    Broström, Anders
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Department of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT.
    Firestone, A.
    ivision of Orthodontics, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH, United States.
    Wright, B.
    Division of Dental Hygiene, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH, United States.
    Josefsson, E.
    Odontologiska Institutionen, Department of Orthodontics, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Lindmark, Ulrika
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Department of Natural Science and Biomedicine. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Centre for Oral Health. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ARN-J (Aging Research Network - Jönköping).
    Oral health problems linked to obstructive sleep apnea are not always recognized within dental care—As described by dental professionals2022In: Clinical and Experimental Dental Research, E-ISSN 2057-4347, Vol. 8, no 1, p. 84-95Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) has an impact on an individual's quality of life and general health, and can also affect their oral health. The patient's experiences, together with intraoral signs and symptoms could indicate the presence of OSA. Knowledge that the patient has, or is at high risk for having OSA can help the dental healthcare provider maintain the oral health and general health for these patients. The purpose was to explore dentists and dental hygienists' experiences when encountering adult patients with potential, untreated and treated OSA.

    Methods: A qualitative inductive approach was used. Experienced dentists and dental hygienists working within Swedish Public Dental Service were strategically selected. Semi-structured face-to-face interviews were performed followed by qualitative content analysis.

    Results: Interviews from 13 participants, seven dental hygienist and six dentists, led to three areas describing varied experience: Importance of the patient encounter and identifying intraoral signs both of which describe experiences related to the importance of the initial unstructured conversation and focused clinical assessments, and strategies for nurturing care which point to interest about care, treatment, and collaborations with medical health care providers.

    Conclusions: Dental professionals are not able to consistently recognize patients who have, or are at high risk for OSA. During the patient encounter, is it important to determine if a patient is at risk for, or has oral signs of OSA.

  • 32. Bergius, Marianne
    et al.
    Broberg, Anders G
    Hakeberg, Magnus
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Oral health. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine.
    Berggren, Ulf
    Prediction of prolonged pain experiences during orthodontic treatment2008In: American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics, ISSN 0889-5406, E-ISSN 1097-6752, Vol. 133, no 3, p. 339.e1-8Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    INTRODUCTION: In this study, we investigated prolonged pain reactions in teenage orthodontic patients during a common orthodontic treatment. The aim was to examine factors predicting pain at the end of a follow-up week after placement of elastic separators. METHODS: Fifty-five patients (ages, 12-18 years) were included. Baseline assessments were made of perceived intensity of general and dental pain experiences, motivation for treatment, dental anxiety, and personality factors (self-esteem and temperament). Pain intensity was assessed on a visual analog scale, and pain medications were recorded. The patients were separated into pain and no-pain groups according to pain experiences at day 7. RESULTS: The pain group (mainly girls) had significantly higher ratings of treatment pain than in the non-pain group at all times measured except for the treatment day. Bivariate and multiple logistic regressions showed significant predictive power from motivation, dental anxiety, activity temperament, and vaccination pain. CONCLUSIONS: In this adolescent patient sample, low motivation for orthodontic treatment, high ratings of vaccination pain, elevated dental anxiety level, and low activity temperament characterized patients reporting pain 1 week after the elastic separators were placed.

  • 33. Bergström, Ingalill
    et al.
    List, Thomas
    Magnusson, Tomas
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Oral health.
    A follow-up study of subjective symptoms of temporomandibular disorders in patients who received acupuncture and/or interocclusal appliance therapy 18-20 years earlier2008In: Acta Odontologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-6357, E-ISSN 1502-3850, Vol. 66, no 2, p. 88-92Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the presence of symptoms of temporomandibular disorders (TMDs) in patients referred to a specialist clinic because of muscular problems 18-20 years earlier and who had received mainly acupuncture and/or interocclusal appliance therapy. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Sixty-five subjects who had received therapy at a TMD specialist clinic 18-20 years earlier were mailed a questionnaire with questions about TMD symptoms, their attitude towards the therapy, and their opinion about the outcome. Fifty-five subjects (85%) answered and returned the questionnaire. RESULTS: Before therapy, 87% had had severe TMD symptoms, but this figure decreased to 38% at the long-term follow-up. The mean values of the subjects' complaints at worst and at best before treatment, measured with a visual analog scale, were 66 (range 26-100) and 31 (range 0-100), respectively. The corresponding figures at the long-term follow-up were 32 (range 0-96) and 16 (range 0-70). Headache at least once a week was originally reported by 73% of the women and by 77% of the men. Headache prevalence 18-20 years later was 35% in women and 54% in men. The majority of patients were positive about the therapy they had received, and would recommend it to a friend with similar complaints. CONCLUSIONS: A majority of the patients reported a lasting improvement in their symptoms. Patients' overall opinions of the therapy received were positive.

  • 34.
    Bjorksved, Margitha
    et al.
    Publ Dent Hlth Serv, Dept Orthodont, Eskilstuna, Sweden.;Postgrad Dent Educ Ctr, Dept Orthodont, POB 1126, SE-70111 Orebro, Sweden..
    Arnrup, Kristina
    Publ Dent Hlth Serv, Dent Res Dept, Orebro, Region Orebro C, Sweden.;Orebro Univ, Sch Hlth Sci, Orebro, Sweden..
    Bazargani, Silvia Miranda
    Postgrad Dent Educ Ctr, Dept Oral & Maxillofacial Radiol, Orebro, Sweden..
    Lund, Henrik
    Univ Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska Acad, Inst Odontol, Dept Oral & Maxillofacial Radiol, Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Magnusson, Anders
    Inst Postgrad Dent Educ, Dept Orthodont, Jonkoping, Sweden..
    Magnuson, Anders
    Orebro Univ Hosp, Clin Epidemiol & Biostat Unit, Orebro, Sweden..
    Lindsten, Rune
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Centre for Oral Health. Inst Postgrad Dent Educ, Dept Orthodont, Jonkoping, Sweden..
    Bazargani, Farhan
    Postgrad Dent Educ Ctr, Dept Orthodont, POB 1126, SE-70111 Orebro, Sweden.;Orebro Univ, Fac Med & Hlth, Sch Med Sci, Orebro, Sweden..
    Open vs closed surgical exposure of palatally displaced canines: a comparison of clinical and patient-reported outcomes-a multicentre, randomized controlled trial2021In: European Journal of Orthodontics, ISSN 0141-5387, E-ISSN 1460-2210, Vol. 43, no 5, p. 487-497Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: To compare treatment time, patients' perceptions during orthodontic treatment, dental fear and side effects, between open and closed surgical exposures in patients with palatally displaced canines (PDCs). Trial design: Multicentre, randomized controlled trial, with random 1:1 allocation of two parallel groups. Materials and methods: One hundred and twenty patients from three different orthodontic centres were randomized into one of the two intervention arms, open or closed surgical exposure. Both techniques had mucoperiosteal flaps raised and bone removed above the PDCs. In open exposure, tissue was removed above the canine, and glass ionomer - reaching above soft tissue - was built on the crown. The canine was then left to erupt spontaneously, prior to orthodontic alignment. At closed exposure, a chain was bonded to the canine and orthodontic traction was applied under the mucosa until eruption. Orthodontic alignment of the canines was undertaken after eruption into the oral cavity, with fixed appliances in both groups. All participants were treated according to intention to treat (ITT). Blinding: Due to the nature of this trial, only outcome assessors could be blinded to the intervention group. Results: One hundred and seventeen patients completed the trial. All PDCs were successfully aligned. Total treatment time was equal in the two techniques, mean difference -0.1 months (95% CI -3.2 to 2.9, P = 0.93). The closed group experienced more pain and discomfort during the active orthodontic traction. Dental fear, root resorption and periodontal status did not show any clinically significant differences between the groups. Generalizability: Results of this randomized controlled trial (RCT) can be generalized only to a similar population aged 9-16 years, if exclusion criteria are met. Conclusion: The closed exposure group experienced more pain and discomfort mostly during active orthodontic traction. All other studied outcomes were similar between the two exposure groups.

  • 35. Björkelund, Cecilia
    et al.
    Andersson-Hange, Dominique
    Andersson, Kate
    Bengtsson, Calle
    Blomstrand, Ann
    Bondyr-Carlsson, Dorota
    Eiben, Gabriele
    Rödström, Kerstin
    Sjöberg, Agneta
    Sundh, Valter
    Weman, Lilian
    Zylberstein, Dimitri
    Hakeberg, Magnus
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Oral health. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine.
    Lissner, Lauren
    Secular trends in cardiovascular risk factors with a 36-year perspective: observations from 38- and 50-year-olds in the Population Study of Women in Gothenburg.2008In: Scandinavian Journal of Primary Health Care, ISSN 0281-3432, E-ISSN 1502-7724, Vol. 26, no 3, p. 140-146Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVES: To study secular trends in cardiovascular risk factors in four different cohorts of women examined in 1968-1969, 1980-1981, 1992-1993 and 2004-2005. DESIGN: Comparison of four representative cohorts of 38- and 50-year-old women over a period of 36 years. SETTING: Gothenburg, Sweden with approximately 450,000 inhabitants. SUBJECTS: Four representative samples of 38- and 50-year-old women were invited to free health examinations (participation rate 59-90%, n =1901). MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Body mass index (BMI), systolic and diastolic blood pressure (SBP, DBP), leisure time exercise, use of antihypertensive medication, smoking, levels of haemoglobin, b-glucose, s-cholesterol, s-triglycerides and HDL-cholesterol. RESULTS: There was no significant difference in mean BMI from 1968-1969 versus 2004-2005. Mean leisure time exercise was significantly higher in later born cohorts; in 1968, around 15% were physically active compared with 40% in 2004. SBP and DBP, mean s-cholesterol and s-triglyceride levels were significantly lower in both 38- and 50-year-old cohorts in 2004-2005 versus 1968-1969. HDL-cholesterol (not measured until 1992-1993), showed a significantly higher mean level in 2004-2005. Reduction of risk factors was apparent in women with a high as well as low level of physical activity. Smoking declined most in women with high levels of physical activity. CONCLUSIONS: Several cardiovascular risk factors related to lifestyle have improved in middle-aged women from the 1960s until today. Most of the positive trends are observed in women with both low and high physical activity.

  • 36.
    Björksved, Margitha
    et al.
    Department of Orthodontics, Public Dental Health Service, Eskilstuna, Sweden.
    Arnrup, Kristina
    Dental Research Department, Public Dental Service, Region Örebro County, Örebro, Sweden.
    Lindsten, Rune
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Oral health. Department of Orthodontics, The Institute for Postgraduate Dental Education, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Magnusson, Anders
    Department of Orthodontics, The Institute for Postgraduate Dental Education, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Sundell, Anna Lena
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Oral health. Department of Paediatric Dentistry, The Institute for Postgraduate Dental Education, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Gustafsson, Annika
    Department of Paediatric Dentistry, Postgraduate Dental Education Center, Örebro, Sweden.
    Bazargani, Farhan
    Department of Orthodontics, Postgraduate Dental Education Center, Örebro, Sweden.
    Closed vs open surgical exposure of palatally displaced canines: surgery time, postoperative complications, and patients' perceptions2018In: European Journal of Orthodontics, ISSN 0141-5387, E-ISSN 1460-2210, Vol. 40, no 6, p. 626-635Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Closed and open surgical techniques are two different main approaches to surgical exposure of palatally displaced canines (PDCs). Because there is insufficient evidence to support one technique over the other, there is a need for randomized controlled trials.

    Objectives: To compare surgery time, complications and patients' perceptions between closed and open surgical techniques in PDCs.

    Trial design: The trial was a multicentre, randomized, controlled trial with two parallel groups randomly allocated in a 1:1 ratio.

    Material and methods: Study participants were 119 consecutive patients from 3 orthodontic centres, with PDCs planned for surgical exposure, randomly allocated according to a computer-generated randomization list, using concealed allocation. Full-thickness mucoperiosteal flap was raised, and bone covering the canine was removed in both interventions. In closed exposure, an attachment with a chain was bonded to the canine and the flap was sutured back with the chain penetrating the mucosa. In open exposure, a window of tissue around the tooth was removed and glass ionomer cement placed on the canine crown, to prevent gingival overgrowth during spontaneous eruption. Patient perceptions were assessed with two questionnaires, for the evening on the day of operation and 7 days post-surgery.

    Blinding: It was not possible to blind either patients or care providers to the interventions. The outcome assessors were blinded and were unaware of patients' intervention group.

    Results: Seventy-five girls and 44 boys, mean age 13.4 years (SD 1.46) participated in the study and got either of the interventions (closed exposure, n = 60; open exposure, n = 59). Surgery time did not differ significantly between the interventions. Complications though were more severe in bilateral cases and the patients experienced more pain and impairment in the open group.

    Conclusion: There were no statistically significant differences regarding surgery time between the groups. Postoperative complications were similar between the groups in unilateral PDCs, but more common in the open group in bilateral cases. More patients in the open group experienced pain and impairment compared to the closed group.

    Trial registration: Trial registration: ClinicalTrials.gov, ID: NCT02186548 and Researchweb.org, ID: 127201.

  • 37.
    Björksved, Margitha
    et al.
    Department of Orthodontics, Public Dental Health Service, Eskilstuna, Sweden; Postgraduate Dental Education Center, Department of Orthodontics, P.O. Box 1126, SE-701 11 Örebro, Sweden; School of Medical Sciences, Örebro University, SE-701 82, Sweden.
    Ryen, Linda
    University Health Care Research Center, Örebro University, SE-701 82, Sweden.
    Lindsten, Rune
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Centre for Oral Health. The Institute for Postgraduate Dental Education, Department of Orthodontics, P.O. Box 1030, SE-551 11 Jönköping, Sweden.
    Bazargani, Farhan
    Postgraduate Dental Education Center, Department of Orthodontics, P.O. Box 1126, SE-701 11 Örebro, Sweden; School of Medical Sciences, Örebro University, SE-701 82, Sweden.
    Open and closed surgical exposure of palatally displaced canines: a cost- minimization analysis of a multicentre, randomized controlled trial2021In: European Journal of Orthodontics, ISSN 0141-5387, E-ISSN 1460-2210, Vol. 43, no 5, p. 498-505Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To evaluate the costs of open and closed surgical exposure and subsequent orthodontic treatment for the correction of palatally displaced canines (PDCs).

    Trial design: A multicentre, two-arm parallel group randomized controlled trial.

    Methods: One hundred twenty adolescents between 9 and 16 years of age, from three orthodontic specialist centres, were randomized to one of the two surgical exposure interventions.The randomization was conducted according to a two-arm parallel group 1:1 allocation ratio, using computerized lists with block randomization. In both the surgical techniques, whole mucoperiosteal flaps were raised, and bone covering the PDCs was removed. In the open technique, glass ionomer was built up on the PDC crown reaching above the mucosa through a hole punched in the flap-to allow the canine to erupt autonomously. After eruption, the canine was orthodontically moved above the mucosa. In the closed technique, an eyelet was bonded onto the PDC, the flap was repositioned and the canine was orthodontically moved beyond the mucosa.The trial ended when the PDC was successfully aligned in the dental arch. Cost analysis was performed including costs for surgery, orthodontic treatment, emergency visits, and material, as well as costs for transports and time spent in connection with every appointment.

    Blinding: Patients and caregivers could not be blinded due to obvious limitations of the clinical setting, while outcome assessors and data analysts were blinded.

    Results: A cost-minimization analysis was performed since both exposure groups succeeded equally well in terms of treatment effects. The two different surgical exposures and following orthodontic treatments did not differ significantly in terms of costs.

    Generalizability and limitations: Costs are estimated in the Swedish setting, which needs to be considered if applying the results in other settings. Calculations of total cost do not include finishing, debonding, retention, and follow-up.

    Conclusion: There is no significant difference in costs between closed and open surgical exposure with following orthodontic treatments in PDCs.

  • 38.
    Bohm, Niklas
    et al.
    Department of Oral Microbiology and Immunology, Institute of Odontology, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Karlsson, Charlott
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Department of Natural Science and Biomedicine.
    Skoogh Andersson, Jessica
    Department of Periodontology, Institute of Odontology, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Almståhl, Annica
    Department of Oral Microbiology and Immunology, Institute of Odontology, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Variations in odontological care routines for patients undergoing treatment for head and neck cancer in county councils/regions of Sweden2020In: Clinical and Experimental Dental Research, E-ISSN 2057-4347, Vol. 6, no 1, p. 3-15Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective

    To investigate current odontological care routines for patients treated for head and neck cancers in the county councils/regions (C/Rs) of Sweden.

    Methods

    An invitation to fill in a web-based questionnaire was sent to dentists/dental hygienists working in dental clinics in the 12 C/Rs, treating and responsible for the odontological care of patients undergoing treatment for cancer of the head and neck. The questionnaire started with two mandatory and one non-mandatory questions, followed by questions regarding routines before (n = 28), during (n = 23), and after (n = 9) treatment, plus two additional questions, totalling 65 questions.

    Results

    Four dental hygienists and six dentists in 10 of the 12 C/Rs answered the questionnaire. Three C/Rs stated that they measure both the unstimulated and stimulated salivary secretion rate, and another C/R stated that they measure the stimulated secretion rate only. Similar recommendations were given regarding oral hygiene, salivary stimulants and substitutes, and extra fluoride. However, great variations were seen regarding recommendations for preventing and relieving oral mucositis. There were also discrepancies regarding information about the importance of avoiding smoking and alcohol. In seven C/Rs, patients visited the dental hygienist once a week during cancer treatment.

    Conclusion

    The results suggests that there are great variations in odontological care given to patients undergoing treatment for cancer of the head and neck region in different county councils/regions in Sweden. There is a need to develop and implement evidence-based guidelines to decrease the risk of oral complications and increase both the quality of life and the quality of care.

  • 39.
    Brahm, Carl-Otto
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Oral health. Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Institute for Postgraduate Dental Education, Region Jönköping County, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Lundgren, Jesper
    Department of Psychology, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Carlsson, Sven G.
    Department of Psychology, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Nilsson, Peter
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Oral health. Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Institute for Postgraduate Dental Education, Region Jönköping County, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Hägglin, Catharina
    Department of Behavioral and Community Dentistry, Institute of Odontology, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Development and evaluation of the Jönköping Dental Fear Coping Model: a health professional perspective2018In: Acta Odontologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-6357, E-ISSN 1502-3850, Vol. 76, no 5, p. 320-330Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to design a structured treatment model focusing on all levels of adult’s dental fear, the Jönköping Dental Fear Coping Model (DFCM). The aim was to study the DFCM from a dental health professional perspective.

    Material and methods: The DFCM was studied by means of quantitative and qualitative analyses. Nine dental clinics participated in Period I (pre-intervention/standard care), and 133 dental health professionals (dentists, dental hygienists, dental assistants) and 3088 patients were included. After completion of Period I, four of the clinics were randomized to Period II (intervention), beginning with the professionals undergoing DFCM training. Following that, 51 dental health professionals treated 1417 patients according to the DFCM. The other five clinics served as controls.

    Results: Half or more of the dental health professionals assessed the model as better than standard care, regarding anamnesis and diagnostics, communication and contact, and understanding of patients and dental fear. The dental health professionals reported higher tension in their fearful patients in Period II compared with Period I, possibly due to their increased awareness of dental fear.

    Conclusions: The qualitative data suggest that dental health professionals find the DFCM beneficial in routine dental care. The model promotes a holistic approach to the treatment of adult patients. However, stress among the professionals was not reduced when measured, neither quantitatively nor qualitatively. It is important to evaluate the model in further studies to make it possible to draw generalizable conclusions. 

  • 40.
    Brahm, Carl-Otto
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Centre for Oral Health. Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Institute for Postgraduate Dental Education, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Lundgren, Jesper
    Department of Psychology, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Carlsson, Sven G.
    Department of Psychology, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Nilsson, Peter
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Centre for Oral Health. Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Institute for Postgraduate Dental Education, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Hägglin, Catharina
    §Department of Behavioral and Community Dentistry, Institute of Odontology, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Evaluation of the Jönköping dental fear coping model: a patient perspective2019In: Acta Odontologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-6357, E-ISSN 1502-3850, Vol. 77, no 3, p. 238-247Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: This study is a part of a project with the aim to construct and evaluate a structured treatment model (the Jönköping Dental Fear Coping Model, DFCM) for the treatment of dental patients. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the DFCM from a patient perspective.

    Material and methods: The study was performed at four Public Dental Clinics, with the same 13 dentists and 14 dental hygienists participating in two treatment periods. In Period I, 1351 patients were included and in Period II, 1417. Standard care was used in Period I, and in Period II the professionals had been trained in and worked according to the DFCM. In the evaluation, the outcome measures were self-rated discomfort, pain and tension, and satisfaction with the professionals.

    Results: In comparison with standard care, less tension was reported among patients treated according to the DFCM, (p =.041), which was also found among female patients in a subgroup analysis (p =.028). Additional subgroup analyses revealed that patients expecting dental treatment (as opposed to examination only) reported less discomfort (p =.033), pain (p =.016) and tension (p =.012) in Period II than in Period I. Patients with low to moderate dental fear reported less pain in Period II than in Period I (p =.014).

    Conclusions: The DFCM has several positive effects on adult patients in routine dental care. In a Swedish context, the differences between standard care and treatment according to the model were small but, in part, statistically significant. However, it is important to evaluate the model in further studies to allow generalization to other settings. 

  • 41. Bratthall, G.
    et al.
    Lindberg, P.
    Havemose-Poulsen, A.
    Holmstrup, P.
    Bay, L.
    Söderholm, G.
    Norderyd, Ola
    STP Periodontology, Malmö, Sweden.
    Andersson, B.
    Rickardsson, B.
    Hallström, H.
    Kullendorff, B.
    Sköld Bell, H.
    Comparison of ready-to-use EMDOGAIN®-gel and EMDOGAIN® in patients with chronic adult periodontitis. A multicenter clinical study2001In: Journal of Clinical Periodontology, ISSN 0303-6979, E-ISSN 1600-051X, Vol. 28, no 10, p. 923-929Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: The aim of this multicenter trial was to compare the clinical and radiographical outcome of a ready-to-use Emdogain®-gel (test) with the marketed Emdogain® (control). Methods: Subjects with bilateral infrabony defects ≥4 mm deep and ≥2 mm wide according to radiographs were selected. 88 subjects with probing pocket depth (PPD) ≥6 mm ≥1 month after supervised oral hygiene and scaling participated. At baseline plaque index, bleeding on probing, PPD and probing attachment level were recorded and reproducible radiographs for computer-based bone level measurements were taken. In each subject, 1 tooth was randomly treated with the test and 1 tooth with the control gel. Examinations were repeated 8 and 16 months post-operatively. Results: After 16 months, the mean test PPD was 4.1 mm and the mean control PPD 4.2 mm. The mean gain of attachment was 2.7 mm for test and 2.9 mm for the control sites, and the radiographic measurements demonstrated a mean gain of 1 mm for both test and control sites. Conclusion: This series of cases demonstrated a statistically significant reduction of pocket depths and gain of attachment and bone after 8 and 16 months with no difference between the 2 preparations.

  • 42.
    Brax Österholm, Tintin
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Oral health.
    Muric, Emina
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Oral health.
    Kariesriskbedömning inom barn- och ungdomstandvård2019Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: The aim of the study was to compile scientific studies that studied the reliability of the caries risk assessment instruments (CAMBRA, Cariogram and R2) and their capacity to predict future caries development in children and adolescents. Method: The study is a general literature study based on scientific articles obtained from the databases Dentistry & Oral Sciences source (DOSS), PUBMED, CINAHL, SwePub and SveMed+. The articles were selected according to inclusion-/exclusion criteria. The included studies were reviewed with modified review template to present studies of strong value. The result is based on a total of 17 scientific articles that respond to the study's purpose and questions. Result: Caries risk assessment instrument is a useful tool in dental care, as it facilitates work with the risk grouping of patients. However, there is a need for further development of the various instruments in order for these to be considered fully reliable. Conclusion: The common feature of the three caries risk assessment instruments is that these should be reviewed and further developed in order to achieve full reliability.

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  • 43. Buhlin, K.
    et al.
    Hultin, M.
    Norderyd, Ola
    Dept. of Periodontology, The Institute for Postgraduate Dental Education, Jönköping, Sweden; Dept. of Periodontology, Faculty of Odontology, Malmö University, Malmö, Sweden.
    Persson, L.
    Pockley, A. G.
    Pussinen, P. J.
    Rabe, P.
    Klinge, B.
    Gustafsson, A.
    Periodontal treatment influences risk markers for atherosclerosis in patients with severe periodontitis2009In: Atherosclerosis, ISSN 0021-9150, E-ISSN 1879-1484, Vol. 206, no 2, p. 518-522Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study investigated the effect of mechanical infection control for periodontitis and periodontal surgery on the prevalence of well-established risk factors for atherosclerosis, and plasma levels of cytokines, antibodies against heat shock proteins and markers of systemic inflammation. Sixty-eight patients between 39 and 73 years of age with severe periodontitis who had been referred to four specialist periodontology clinics in Sweden were investigated. A fasting venous blood sample was taken at baseline and additional samples were collected after 3 and 12 months. A total of 54 patients underwent periodontal treatment. The periodontal treatment was successful, as pathogenic gingival pockets decreased significantly. Plasma glucose, lipids and markers of systemic inflammation were not significantly altered after 3 months. One year after the initial treatment, HDL-C concentrations were significantly increased (Δ0.08 mmol/L) whereas LDL-C concentrations decreased (Δ0.23 mmol/L). Haptoglobin concentrations were also lower. Interleukin-18 and interferon-γ levels were also lower after 12 months (60 ng/L (-23%) and 11 ng/L (-97%) respectively). Treatment had no effect on plasma levels of IgA, IgG1, IgG2 antibodies against heat shock proteins. In conclusion, this study indicates that standard treatment for periodontal disease induces systemic changes in several biochemical markers that reflect the risk for atherosclerosis. 

  • 44. Buhlin, K.
    et al.
    Hultin, M.
    Norderyd, Ola
    Department of Periodontology, Institute for Postgraduate Dental Education, Jönköping, Sweden; Department of Periodontology, Faculty of Odontology, Malmö University, Malmö, Sweden.
    Persson, L.
    Pockley, A. G.
    Rabe, P.
    Klinge, B.
    Gustafsson, A.
    Risk factors for atherosclerosis in cases with severe periodontitis2009In: Journal of Clinical Periodontology, ISSN 0303-6979, E-ISSN 1600-051X, Vol. 36, no 7, p. 541-549Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: Studies have reported on an association between cardiovascular disease (CVD) and periodontitis. The purpose of this case-control study was to provide an insight into this association by determining the plasma levels of some risk markers for CVD in cases with periodontitis.

    Materials and Methods: Sixty-eight cases with periodontitis, mean age 53.9 (SD 7.9) years, and 48 randomly selected healthy controls, mean age 53.1 (SD 7.9) years, were investigated. Fasting blood plasma was analysed for glucose, lipids, markers systemic inflammation, cytokines and antibodies against heat shock proteins (Hsp). The associations between periodontitis and the various substances analysed in plasma were calculated using a multivariate logistic regression model, which compensated for age, gender, smoking and body mass index.

    Results: The regression analyses revealed a significant association between periodontitis and high levels of C-reactive protein (CRP) [odds ratio (OR) 4.0, confidence interval (CI) 1.4-11.4] and fibrinogen (OR 8.7, CI 2.6-28.4), IL-18 (OR 6.5, CI 2.2-19.5), and decreased levels of IL-4 (OR 0.12, CI 0.0-0.5). The study showed increased levels of antibodies against Hsp65 (OR 2.8, CI 1-7.6) and 70 (OR 2.9, CI 1.1-7.8) and decreased levels of antibodies against Hsp60 (OR 0.3, CI 0.1-0.8).

    Conclusions: Periodontitis was associated with increased levels of CRP, glucose, fibrinogen and IL-18, and with decreased levels of IL-4. 

  • 45.
    Carda-Diéguez, M.
    et al.
    Genomics & Health Department, FISABIO Institute, Valencia, Spain.
    Rosier, B. T.
    Genomics & Health Department, FISABIO Institute, Valencia, Spain.
    Lloret, S.
    Department of Stomatology, University of Valencia, Valencia, Spain.
    Llena, C.
    Department of Stomatology, University of Valencia, Valencia, Spain.
    Mira, Alex
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dept. of Natural Science and Biomedicine. Genomics & Health Department, FISABIO Institute, Valencia, Spain; CIBER of Epidemiology and Public Health, Madrid, Spain.
    The tongue biofilm metatranscriptome identifies metabolic pathways associated with the presence or absence of halitosis2022In: npj Biofilms and Microbiomes, E-ISSN 2055-5008, Vol. 8, no 1, article id 100Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Intra-oral halitosis usually results from the production of volatile sulfur compounds, such as methyl mercaptan and hydrogen sulfide, by the tongue microbiota. There are currently no reports on the microbial gene-expression profiles of the tongue microbiota in halitosis. In this study, we performed RNAseq of tongue coating samples from individuals with and without halitosis. The activity of Streptococcus (including S. parasanguinis), Veillonella (including V. dispar) and Rothia (including R. mucilaginosa) was associated with halitosis-free individuals while Prevotella (including P. shahi), Fusobacterium (including F. nucleatum) and Leptotrichia were associated with halitosis. Interestingly, the metatranscriptome of patients that only had halitosis levels of methyl mercaptan was similar to that of halitosis-free individuals. Finally, gene expression profiles showed a significant over-expression of genes involved in L-cysteine and L-homocysteine synthesis, as well as nitrate reduction genes, in halitosis-free individuals and an over-expression of genes responsible for cysteine degradation into hydrogen sulfide in halitosis patients.

  • 46. Carlsson, G.E
    et al.
    Magnusson, Tomas
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Oral health.
    Orofaziale Schmerzen. Ein Fallbeispiel zur Behandling temporomandibulärer Funktionsstörungen in der Praxis2000In: Die Quintessenz, ISSN 0033-6580, no 51, p. 289-290Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 47. Carlsson, Gunnar E
    et al.
    Magnusson, Tomas
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine.
    Klinisk bettfysiologi för allmäntandläkaren: med liten ordbok "från abrasion till öronsusningar"1982Book (Other academic)
  • 48. Christersson, L. A.
    et al.
    Norderyd, Ola
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine. Periodontal Disease Clinical Research Center and Department of Oral Biology, School of Dental Medicine, State University of New York at Buffalo, USA.
    Puchalsky, C. S.
    Topical application of tetracycline‐HCl in human periodontitis1993In: Journal of Clinical Periodontology, ISSN 0303-6979, E-ISSN 1600-051X, Vol. 20, no 2, p. 88-95Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Previous in vitro studies have suggested that tetracycline‐HCl (TTC‐HCl) is adsorbed and actively released from root dentin. The aim of the current study was to evaluate the binding to and release of TTC‐HCl from human root dentin surfaces in vivo, and to evaluate the clinical utility of TTC‐HCl irrigation as an adjunct to scaling and root planing. Experiment I utilized two contralateral mandibular single‐rooted teeth which were examined in four adults with severe generalized periodontitis. One tooth in each patient was carefully scaled and root planed, under local anesthesia, and the other used as an unsealed control. Each subgingival root surface was irrigated for 5 min with an aqueous TTC‐HCl solution at a concentration of 100 mg/ml. Gingival crevicular fluid samples were collected on paper strips for the next three weeks. The TTC‐HCl concentrations in each sample were determined by the inhibition zone of B. cereus cultured on agar plates. The TTC‐HCl concentrations in gingival crevicular fluid collected 15 min after irrigation were 3100±670 μg/ml from the scaled lesions and 4700±1300 μg/ml from the unsealed root surfaces. The antibiotic concentrations decreased logarithmically over the next 7 days; 1500±270 μ/g/ml and 1100±330μ/g/ml at 2 h. 880±350μ/g/ml and 1300±360 μ/g/ml at 6 h and 19±5μ/g/ml and 31±26 μ/g/ml at 1 week for scaled and unsealed root surfaces, respectively. Results for week two and three indicated an average of over 8 μg/ml. The TTC‐HCl concentrations in gingival crevicular fluid from scaled and unsealed root surfaces were not statistically different at any time point. The tetracycline irrigation resulted in release of tetracycline at concentrations well above therapeutic concentrations for at least 1 week. Experiment II comprised 11 patients with severe adult periodontitis. All subjects were scaled and root planed prior to baseline measurements. The patients were monitored by the following parameters: probing pocket depth (PPD), probing attachment level (PAL), gingival index (GI) and plaque index (PI). 54 contralateral teeth exhibiting residual pocket depths of 5 mm were selected. Within each pair identified for the study, teeth were randomly assigned as test or control sites. After baseline measurement, each subgingival root surface was irrigated for 5 min; either with an aqueous TTC‐HCl solution of 100 mg/ml (test), or a 0.9% NaCl solution (control). At 3 and 6 months post‐treatment, the PI was unchanged for both groups. The GI index was reduced (0.062 > p > 0.001) in a similar manner for both groups. PPD showed statistically significant (p < 0.001) mean/patient decrease of similar magnitudes, 2.3±1.0 mm (test), and ‐1.6±0.8 mm (control) at 3 months, and ‐2.1±1.1 mm (test), and ‐1.4±0.9 mm at 6 months (control), respectively. Also, PAL measurements indicated a statistically significant average gain/patient of 2.1±1.1 mm in the test group (p<0.00l) and again of 1.2±1.0 mm in the controls (p = 0.002) at 3 months, and 1.8±1.1 mm (test; p<0.001) and 1.0±0.9 mm (controls; p= 0.005) at 6 months. Comparisons of the changes, between the groups, indicated statistically greater gain of PAL in the test group at both the 3 (p= 0.042) and 6 months (p= 0.034) intervals. These results suggest that TTC‐HCl irrigation of root surfaces for long periods of time (5 min) results in a subsequent release of active antibiotic into the gingival fluid at therapeutic levels for at least 1 week. TTC‐HCl irrigation resulted in significantly greater attachment gain as compared to scaling and root planing alone over at least a month period of healing.

  • 49. Davies, I.
    et al.
    Karring, T.
    Norderyd, Ola
    Department of Periodontology, Institute for Postgraduate Dental Education, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Advances in the behavioural and public health aspects of periodontitis. Group D Consensus report of the fifth European workshop in periodontology2005In: Journal of Clinical Periodontology, ISSN 0303-6979, E-ISSN 1600-051X, Vol. 32, no SUPPL. 6, p. 326-327Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 50.
    de Almeida, Fernando J. M.
    et al.
    Tandvårdens Kompetenscentrum, Norrbotten Public Dental Service, Luleå, Sweden.
    Dawson, Victoria S.
    Department of Endodontics, Faculty of Odontology, Malmö University, Malmö, Sweden.
    Kvist, Thomas
    Department of Endodontology, Institute of Odontology, The Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Frisk, Fredrik
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Department of Clinical Diagnostics.
    Bjørndal, Lars
    Department of Cariology and Endodontics, Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Isberg, Per-Erik
    Department of Statistics, Lund University School of Economics and Management, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Fransson, Helena
    Department of Endodontics, Faculty of Odontology, Malmö University, Malmö, Sweden.
    Jonasson, P.
    Markvart, M.
    Pigg, M.
    Wigsten, E.
    Periradicular surgery: A longitudinal registry study of 10-year outcomes and factors predictive of post-surgical extraction2023In: International Endodontic Journal, ISSN 0143-2885, E-ISSN 1365-2591, Vol. 56, no 10, p. 1212-1221Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: This historical prospective cohort study of the adult population of Sweden is based on data from a national registry: the primary aim was to evaluate the long-term survival of teeth after periradicular surgery. A secondary aim was to identify factors predictive of extraction within 10 years of registration of periradicular surgery.

    Methodology: The cohort consisted of all individuals who had undergone periradicular surgery to treat apical periodontitis, as reported to the Swedish Social Insurance Agency (SSIA) in 2009. The cohort was followed until 31 December 2020. Subsequent registrations of extractions were collected for Kaplan–Meier survival analyses and survival tables. The patients' sex, age, dental service provider and tooth group were also retrieved from SSIA. Only one tooth per individual was included in the analyses. Multivariable regression analysis was used and p <.05 was considered statistically significant. The reporting guidelines STROBE and PROBE were followed.

    Results: After data cleaning, and exclusion of 157 teeth, 5622 teeth/individuals remained for analysis. The mean age of the individuals at the time of the periradicular surgery was 60.5 years (range 20–97, standard deviation 13.31); 55% were women. At the end of the follow-up, that is, up to 12 years, a total of 34.1% of the teeth had been reported as extracted. The multivariate logistic regression analysis, based on follow-up data at 10 years after registration of the periradicular surgery, included 5548 teeth, of which 1461 (26.3%) had been extracted. Significant associations between the independent variables tooth group and dental care setting (both p <.001) and the dependent variable extraction were found. The highest odds ratio (OR) for extraction applied to tooth group: compared to maxillary incisors and canines, mandibular molars were at greatest risk of extraction (OR 2.429, confidence interval 1.975–2.987, p <.001).

    Conclusions: After periradicular surgery in predominantly elderly people in Sweden, approximately three-quarters of the teeth are retained over a 10-year period. The type of tooth is associated with extraction: mandibular molars are at greater risk of extraction than maxillary incisors and canines.

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