Change search
Refine search result
1234 1 - 50 of 155
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Afsharnejad, Bahareh
    et al.
    School of Allied Health, Curtin University, Kent Street, Bentley, Perth, 6102, WA, Australia.
    Black, Melissa H.
    School of Allied Health, Curtin University, Kent Street, Bentley, Perth, 6102, WA, Australia.
    Falkmer, Marita
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Bölte, Sven
    School of Allied Health, Curtin University, Kent Street, Bentley, Perth, 6102, WA, Australia.
    Girdler, Sonya
    School of Allied Health, Curtin University, Kent Street, Bentley, Perth, 6102, WA, Australia.
    The Methodological Quality and Intervention Fidelity of Randomised Controlled Trials Evaluating Social Skills Group Programs in Autistic Adolescents: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis2024In: Journal of autism and developmental disorders, ISSN 0162-3257, E-ISSN 1573-3432, Vol. 54, p. 1281-1316Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A systematic review and meta-analysis were utilised to explore the methodological quality, program fidelity, and efficacy of social skills group programs (SSGPs) aiming to support autistic adolescents in navigating their everyday social worlds. The study evaluated the methodological quality and theoretical fidelity of studies, with a random effect meta-analysis conducted to summarise the overall efficacy of SSGP and its effect on social communication and interaction, behavioural/emotional challenges, adaptive functioning, and autism characteristics. Although findings from the 18 identified studies indicated an adjusted medium overall effect with these programs successfully supporting autistic adolescents’ socialisation needs (g = 0. 60, p < 0.001), most studies demonstrated medium to low program fidelity despite their good methodological quality. Given the significant heterogeneity of SSGPs and variations in the design and measurement frameworks of efficacy studies, understanding the generalisability of the findings of this research is unclear.

  • 2.
    Afsharnejad, Bahareh
    et al.
    School of Allied Health, Curtin University, Perth, WA, Australia; Curtin Autism Research Group (CARG), Curtin University, Perth, WA, Australia.
    Falkmer, Marita
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD. School of Allied Health, Curtin University, Perth, WA, Australia; Curtin Autism Research Group (CARG), Curtin University, Perth, WA, Australia.
    Black, Melissa H.
    School of Allied Health, Curtin University, Perth, WA, Australia Curtin Autism Research Group (CARG), Curtin University, Perth, WA, Australia.
    Alach, Tasha
    Autism Association of Western Australia, Perth, WA, Australia.
    Lenhard, Fabian
    Centre for Psychiatry Research, Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Karolinska Institutet, and Stockholm Health Care Services, Region Stockholm, CAP Research Centre, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Fridell, Anna
    Center of Neurodevelopmental Disorders (KIND), Centre for Psychiatry Research, Division of Neuropsychiatry, Department of Women’s and Children’s Health, Karolinska Institutet and Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Stockholm Health Care Services, Stockholm County Council, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Coco, Christina
    Center of Neurodevelopmental Disorders (KIND), Centre for Psychiatry Research, Division of Neuropsychiatry, Department of Women’s and Children’s Health, Karolinska Institutet and Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Stockholm Health Care Services, Stockholm County Council, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Milne, Kelly
    Autism Association of Western Australia, Perth, WA, Australia.
    Bolte, Sven
    Curtin Univ, Sch Allied Hlth, Perth, WA, Australia.;Curtin Univ, Curtin Autism Res Grp CARG, Perth, WA, Australia.;Karolinska Inst, Dept Womens & Childrens Hlth, Div Neuropsychiat, Ctr Neurodev Disorders KIND,Ctr Psychiat Res, Stockholm, Sweden.;Stockholm Cty Council, Stockholm Hlth Care Serv, Child & Adolescent Psychiat, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Girdler, Sonya
    School of Allied Health, Curtin University, Perth, WA, Australia Curtin Autism Research Group (CARG), Curtin University, Perth, WA, Australia Center of Neurodevelopmental Disorders (KIND), Centre for Psychiatry Research, Division of Neuropsychiatry, Department of Women’s and Children’s Health, Karolinska Institutet and Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Stockholm Health Care Services, Stockholm County Council, Stockholm, Sweden; School of Allied Health, University of Western Australia, Perth, WA, Australia.
    KONTAKT (R) social skills group training for Australian adolescents with autism spectrum disorder: a randomized controlled trial2022In: European Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, ISSN 1018-8827, E-ISSN 1435-165X, Vol. 31, p. 1695-1713Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    While there is a large body of evidence drawn from randomised controlled trials supporting the efficacy of SSGT in autistic adolescents, the control arms of these studies are almost exclusively treated either as usual or waitlist. Addressing this limitation, 90 verbal autistic adolescents (70% male) aged 12-17 years (M = 13.77, SD = 1.6) with IQ > 70 participated in this pragmatic two-armed randomised controlled trial design study evaluating the efficacy of sixteen 90-min sessions of SSGT KONTAKT (R) (n = 46) in comparison to a manualised interactive group cooking programme (n = 44) of equal dosage controlling for the potentially confounding effects of exposure to a social group context. The primary outcome was the adolescents' progress towards achieving their personally meaningful social goals at follow-up. Secondary outcomes were changes in autistic traits, quality of life, facial emotion recognition skills, social anxiety, and loneliness. Assessments were conducted at baseline, post intervention and 12-week follow-up. The interaction between time point and group allocation was investigated through a random-effects regression model (linear mixed model) to examine changes in the dependent outcomes. While intention-to-treat analysis (N = 90) demonstrated that both SSGT (ES = 1.36, p < .001) and active control (ES = 1.10, p < .001) groups made progress towards their personally meaningful social goals at follow-up, KONTAKT (R) participants demonstrated greater progress in social goal attainment than their peers in the active control group (ES = 0.35, p = .04). Findings suggest that KONTAKT (R) is efficacious in supporting autistic adolescents to achieve their personally meaningful social goals compared to other prosocial group activities.

  • 3.
    Ahorsu, Daniel Kwasi
    et al.
    Department of Rehabilitation Sciences, Faculty of Health and Social Sciences, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hung Hom, Hong Kong.
    Imani, Vida
    Pediatric Health Research Center, Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Tabriz, Iran.
    Potenza, Marc N.
    Department of Psychiatry, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, CT, USA.
    Chen, Hsin-Pao
    Division of Colon and Rectal Surgery, Department of Surgery, E-DA Hospital, I-Shou University, School of Medicine, Kaohsiung, Taiwan; College of Medicine, I-Shou University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan.
    Lin, Chung-Ying
    Institute of Allied Health Sciences, College of Medicine, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan, Taiwan.
    Pakpour, Amir H.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Department of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, The Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare. Social Determinants of Health Research Center, Research Institute for Prevention of Non-Communicable Diseases, Qazvin University of Medical Sciences, Qazvin, Iran.
    Mediating Roles of Psychological Distress, Insomnia, and Body Image Concerns in the Association Between Exercise Addiction and Eating Disorders2023In: Psychology Research and Behavior Management, E-ISSN 1179-1578, Vol. 16, p. 2533-2542Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: Exercising can promote good health. However, excessive exercising may have downsides. This study examined the association between exercise addiction and eating disorders and whether the identified association was mediated by psychological distress, insomnia (including sleep quality), and body image concern.

    Methods: A total of 2088 adolescents (mean age of 15.3 years) participated in this cross-sectional study by questions assessing exercise addiction, eating disorders, psychological distress, insomnia, sleep quality, and body image concern.

    Results: There were significantly positive relationships between the variables (r=0.12-0.54, p<0.01) with effect sizes from small to large. The four potential mediators (ie, insomnia, sleep quality, psychological distress, and body image concern), individually and in total, significantly mediated the association between exercise addiction and eating disorders.

    Conclusion: The findings suggest that exercise addiction in adolescents may influence eating disorders through multiple pathways, such as insomnia, psychological distress, and body image concerns. Future research should examine these relationships longitudinally and use gathered information to inform intervention development. Clinicians and healthcare workers are encouraged to assess exercise addiction when treating individuals with eating disorders.

  • 4.
    Alimoradi, Z.
    et al.
    Social Determinants of Health Research Center, Research Institute for Prevention of Non-Communicable Diseases, Qazvin University of Medical Sciences, Qazvin, Iran.
    Griffiths, M. D.
    International Gaming Research Unit, Psychology Department, Nottingham Trent University, Nottingham, United Kingdom.
    Pakpour, Amir H.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dept. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, The Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare.
    Application of online cognitive-behavioral therapy for insomnia among individuals with epilepsy2023In: Handbook of Cognitive Behavioral Therapy by Disorder: Case Studies and Application for Adults / [ed] C. R. Martin,V. B. Patel & V. R. Preedy, Elsevier , 2023, p. 409-415Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Approximately 50 million individuals worldwide suffer from epilepsy, which has various neurological, cognitive, psychological, and social consequences including insomnia. Several factors may explain insomnia among individuals with epilepsy including new diagnoses of epilepsy, changes at work, school, and social role changes. Moreover, anxiety, stress, and insecurity about seizure control can contribute to insomnia. Nonpharmacological methods including cognitive-behavioral therapy can be used to alleviate insomnia. Cognitive-behavioral therapy is a type of psychotherapy that focuses on the effect of an individual’s beliefs, thoughts, and attitudes on their feelings and behaviors. Cognitive-behavioral therapy for insomnia (CBT-I) is one of the therapies in sleep science and uses the general principles of cognitive-behavioral therapy and is designed to eliminate the symptoms of insomnia. The internet is an emerging platform for mental health services worldwide. Internet-based CBT or CBT-I has been used for insomnia with promising results. If the content of CBT-I-based technology (which is disseminated via the internet, e-mail, or mobile phone) is of good quality and has credible evidence-based experiences, it will have positive therapeutic effects and initial patient acceptance. This chapter introduces the application of a six-session online CBT-I for three individuals with epilepsy. The content can also be used as a guide for treating insomnia among individuals with epilepsy.

  • 5.
    Alimoradi, Z.
    et al.
    Social Determinants of Health Research Center, Research Institute for Prevention of Non-Communicable Diseases, Qazvin University of Medical Sciences, Qazvin, Iran.
    Griffiths, M. D.
    International Gaming Research Unit, Psychology Department, Nottingham Trent University, Nottingham, United Kingdom.
    Pakpour, Amir H.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dept. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, The Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare.
    Epilepsy, sexual function, and mindfulness-based cognitive therapy2023In: Handbook of Cognitive Behavioral Therapy by Disorder: Case Studies and Application for Adults / [ed] C. R. Martin,V. B. Patel & V. R. Preedy, Elsevier , 2023, p. 135-146Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Epilepsy, like many common medical disorders, can cause sexual dysfunction. However, the prevalence and nature of sexual dysfunction among people with epilepsy, its causes, and optimal management strategies are unclear. Sexual dysfunction in epilepsy is caused by several factors including disease-related factors and drug treatment, psychiatric factors, and social factors. Due to the significant prevalence of sexual dysfunction among patients with epilepsy, the synergistic effect of sexual dysfunction, and mental disorders, design and implementation of psychological interventions including mindfulness-based cognitive therapy (MBCT) for sexual disorders among patients with epilepsy have been proposed. MBCT is an approach to psychotherapy that uses cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) techniques alongside mindfulness meditation techniques. MBCT protocol has been adapted to treat female sexual dysfunction of different groups including epilepsy showing promising effects. Consequently, issues concerning sexual activity should be raised by healthcare professionals as a routine part of the management of patients with epilepsy, and MBCT can be considered as a promising effective treatment strategy.

  • 6.
    Alimoradi, Zainab
    et al.
    Social Determinants of Health Research Center, Research Institute for Prevention of Non-Communicable Diseases, Qazvin University of Medical Sciences, Qazvin, Iran.
    Gozal, David
    Department of Child Health and the Child Health Research Institute, The University of Missouri School of Medicine, Columbia, MO, USA.
    Tsang, Hector W. H.
    Department of Rehabilitation Sciences, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Kowloon, Hong Kong.
    Lin, Chung-Ying
    Institute of Allied Health Sciences, National Cheng Kung University Hospital, College of Medicine, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan, Taiwan.
    Broström, Anders
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dept. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT.
    Ohayon, Maurice M.
    Stanford Sleep Epidemiology Research Center (SSERC), School of Medicine, Stanford University, Palo Alto, CA, USA.
    Pakpour, Amir H.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dept. of Nursing Science. Social Determinants of Health Research Center, Research Institute for Prevention of Non-Communicable Diseases, Qazvin University of Medical Sciences, Qazvin, Iran.
    Gender-specific estimates of sleep problems during the COVID-19 pandemic: Systematic review and meta-analysis2022In: Journal of Sleep Research, ISSN 0962-1105, E-ISSN 1365-2869, Vol. 31, no 1, article id e13432Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The outbreak of the novel coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) changed lifestyles worldwide and subsequently induced individuals? sleep problems. Sleep problems have been demonstrated by scattered evidence among the current literature on COVID-19; however, little is known regarding the synthesised prevalence of sleep problems (i.e. insomnia symptoms and poor sleep quality) for males and females separately. The present systematic review and meta-analysis aimed to answer the important question regarding prevalence of sleep problems during the COVID-19 outbreak period between genders. Using the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses guideline and Newcastle?Ottawa Scale checklist, relevant studies with satisfactory methodological quality searched for in five academic databases (Scopus, PubMed Central, ProQuest, Web of Science , and EMBASE) were included and analysed. The protocol of the project was registered in the International Prospective Register of Systematic Reviews (PROSPERO; identification code CRD42020181644). A total of 54 papers (N = 67,722) in the female subgroup and 45 papers (N = 45,718) in the male subgroup were pooled in the meta-analysis. The corrected pooled estimated prevalence of sleep problems was 24% (95% confidence interval [CI] 19%?29%) for female participants and 27% (95% CI 24%?30%) for male participants. Although in both gender subgroups, patients with COVID-19, health professionals and general population showed the highest prevalence of sleep problems, it did not reach statistical significance. Based on multivariable meta-regression, both gender groups had higher prevalence of sleep problems during the lockdown period. Therefore, healthcare providers should pay attention to the sleep problems and take appropriate preventive action.

  • 7.
    Allerby, Katarina
    et al.
    Sahlgrens Univ Hosp, Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Goulding, Anneli
    Univ Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska Univ Hosp, Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Ali, Lilas
    Univ Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska Univ Hosp, Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Gremyr, Andreas
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. IMPROVE (Improvement, innovation, and leadership in health and welfare). Sahlgrenska Univ Hosp, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Waern, Margda
    Univ Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska Univ Hosp, Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Person-Centered Psychosis Care How Increasing Person-Centeredness In Psychosis Inpatient Care Relate To Care Consumption And Ward Burden2020In: Schizophrenia Bulletin, ISSN 0586-7614, E-ISSN 1745-1701, Vol. 46, no Supplement 1, p. S323-S323Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 8.
    Allerby, Katarina
    et al.
    Sahlgrenska Univ Hosp, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Goulding, Anneli
    Univ Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska Univ Hosp, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Ali, Lilas
    Univ Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska Univ Hosp, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Gremyr, Andreas
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. IMPROVE (Improvement, innovation, and leadership in health and welfare). Sahlgrenska Univ Hosp, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Waern, Margda
    Univ Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska Univ Hosp, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Person-Centered Psychosis Care (PCPC) In An Inpatient Setting: Ward Level Data And Staff Workload2019In: Schizophrenia Bulletin, ISSN 0586-7614, E-ISSN 1745-1701, Vol. 45, no Supplement 2, p. S304-S304Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The person-centered care approach has been little tested in inpatient settings for persons with schizophrenia. An intervention, PersonCentered Psychosis Care (PCPC), was created to increase person-centered care through an educational intervention for staff. The education had a participatory approach where participants were involved in shaping the education and creating projects aimed at care development. The PCPC intervention focused on the patient’s narrative, the creation of a partnership between the patient and staff, and on coming to an agreement between the patient and staff concerning the care. The present study aims to compare staff experienced workload and ward level data before and after implementation of the intervention.

    Methods: The study was carried out on 4 hospital wards (43 beds) at the Psychosis Clinic, Gothenburg, Sweden. Data was collected during a 6-month pre-intervention period, followed by an implementation period of 3  years, and finally a post intervention data collection period (9 months). During both data collection periods, one nurse per ward filled out a measure of daily subjective workload (a VAS scale with 0 indicating no burden at all and 10 indicating the highest imaginable burden). Additional ward level data (length of hospital stay, involuntary interventions, rehospitalization rates) were collected via the clinic’s electronic monitoring system.

    Results: The pre-intervention ratings (n=505) showed a mean subjective workload of 5.48 (SD=1.94). The post intervention workload (n=465) showed a mean of 4.51 (SD=2.08) which represents a significant reduction of experienced workload (t (968) = p <.0005). Analyses regarding length of hospital stay, involuntary interventions, and rehospitalization rates are underway and will be presented.

    Discussion: The findings indicate an improvement in the work environment for hospital staff and provide a quantitative result in line with staff experiences previously reported in our focus group study. The before and after design has its limitations, but the positive findings motivate further testing with a more rigorous design such as a cluster randomized study.

  • 9.
    Andersson, Gunnel
    et al.
    Södertörns högskola.
    Bülow, PerJönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Behavioural Science and Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. SALVE (Social challenges, Actors, Living conditions, reseach VEnue). Psykiatriska kliniken, Länssjukhuset Ryhov, Jönköping.Denhov, AnneInstitutionen för socialt arbete, Stockholms universitet.Topor, AlainInstitutionen för socialt arbete, Stockholms universitet.
    Från patient till person: Om allvarliga psykiska problem - vardag, vård och stöd2016Collection (editor) (Other academic)
  • 10.
    Andersson, Gunnel
    et al.
    FoU-Södertörn, R&D, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Denhov, Anne
    Department of Social Work, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Bülow, Per
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Behavioural Science and Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. SALVE (Social challenges, Actors, Living conditions, reseach VEnue). Department of Psychiatry, Ryhov County Hospital, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Topor, Alain
    Department of Social Work, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Aloneness and loneliness – persons with severe mental illness and experiences of being alone2015In: Scandinavian Journal of Disability Research, ISSN 1501-7419, E-ISSN 1745-3011, Vol. 17, no 4, p. 353-365Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    People with severe mental illness (SMI) are often described as lonely and socially incapable – an inability resulting from the mental illness. The aim of this article is to explore experiences of being alone among persons with SMI. The article is based on interviews with 19 persons diagnosed with psychosis who were interviewed between four and nine times over a period of three years. The findings show that experiences of being alone can be identified by two concepts: aloneness and loneliness. The persons in the study appeared as socially able and active in relation to their social lives. However, a social agent does not operate in a void but in interaction with specific living conditions; the experiences of aloneness and loneliness may be viewed as the result of the interplay between the individual and the social and material environment.

  • 11.
    Andersson, Gunnel
    et al.
    Research and Development Center, FoU Södertörn, Haninge, Sweden.
    Ellegård, Kajsa
    Division Technology and Social Change, Department of Thematic Studies, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Bülow, Per
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dept. of Social Work.
    Denhov, Anne
    Department of Social Work, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Vrotsou, Katerina
    Department of Science and Technology, Linköping University, Norrköping, Sweden.
    Stefansson, Claes-Göran
    Department of Social Work, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Topor, Alain
    Department of Social Work, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    A longitudinal study of men and women diagnosed with psychosis: trajectories revealing interventions in a time-geographic framework2022In: GeoJournal, ISSN 0343-2521, E-ISSN 1572-9893, Vol. 87, no 4, p. 2423-2440Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The living conditions for persons with severe mental illness have undergone substantial change in Sweden as well as in the rest of the Western world due to the downsizing of inpatient care and the development of community-based interventions. However, there is a lack of knowledge concerning the “trajectories of interventions” in this new, fragmented, institutional landscape. The aim of the study was to explore types of interventions and when they occur in a 10-year follow-up of 437 women and men diagnosed with psychosis for the first time. Based on registers and using a timegeographic visualization method, the results showed a great diversity of trajectories and differences between sexes. The aggregate picture revealed that over the 10-year period there were considerable periods with no interventions for both men and women. Furthermore, institutional interventions more commonly occurred among women but appeared for longer periods among men. Community-based interventions declined among women and increased among men during the period.

  • 12.
    Andersson, Gunnel
    et al.
    FoU Sodertorn, Res & Dev Ctr, Handen, Sweden..
    Vrotsou, Katerina
    Linkoping Univ, Dept Sci & Technol, Norrkoping, Sweden..
    Denhov, Anne
    Stockholm Univ, Dept Social Work, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Topor, Alain
    Stockholm Univ, Dept Social Work, Stockholm, Sweden.;Univ Agder, Dept Psychosocial Work, Kristiansand, Norway..
    Bulow, Per
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Social Work.
    Ellegard, Kajsa
    Linkoping Univ, Dept Themat Studies TEMA, Technol & Social Change TEMAT, Linkoping, Sweden..
    A diversity of patterns: 10-year trajectories of men and women diagnosed with psychosis for the first time. A time-geographic approach2020In: Moravian Geographical Reports, ISSN 1210-8812, E-ISSN 2199-6202, Vol. 28, no 4, p. 283-298Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    People with severe mental illness face a different 'interventional' landscape compared to some decades ago, when mental hospitals were dominant, in Sweden as well as in the rest of the Western world. The aim of the research reported in this article was to follow men and women diagnosed with psychosis for the first time over a 10-year period, and to explore what interventions they experienced. The interventions, here defined as "spheres", were either community-based or institutional. A third sphere represents no interventions. Based on data from registers and using a time-geographic approach, the individuals were visualised as 10-year trajectories where their transitions between the different spheres were highlighted. The results show a great diversity of trajectories. Two main categories were detected: two-spheres (community-based and no interventions) and three-spheres (adding institutional interventions). One third of the population experienced only community-based interventions, with a higher proportion of men than women. Consequently, more women had institutional experience. Two sub-categories reveal trajectories not being in the interventional sphere in a stepwise manner before the 10th year, and long-term trajectories with interventions in the 10th year. The most common pattern was long-term trajectories, embracing about half of the population, while one-fifth left the institutional sphere before the 5th year.

  • 13.
    Arnold, Samuel R. C.
    et al.
    Department of Developmental Disability Neuropsychiatry (3DN), UNSW Sydney, New South Wales, Australia.
    Foley, Kitty-Rose
    Cooperative Research Centre for Living with Autism (Autism CRC), Brisbane, Queensland, Australia.
    Hwang, Ye In (Jane)
    Department of Developmental Disability Neuropsychiatry (3DN), UNSW Sydney, New South Wales, Australia.
    Richdale, Amanda L.
    Cooperative Research Centre for Living with Autism (Autism CRC), Brisbane, Queensland, Australia.
    Uljarevic, Mirko
    Stanford Autism Center, Division of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, School of Medicine, Stanford University.
    Lawson, Lauren P.
    Cooperative Research Centre for Living with Autism (Autism CRC), Brisbane, Queensland, Australia.
    Cai, Ru Ying
    Cooperative Research Centre for Living with Autism (Autism CRC), Brisbane, Queensland, Australia.
    Falkmer, Torbjörn
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Cooperative Research Centre for Living with Autism (Autism CRC), Brisbane, Queensland, Australia.
    Falkmer, Marita
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD. Cooperative Research Centre for Living with Autism (Autism CRC), Brisbane, Queensland, Australia.
    Lennox, Nick
    Cooperative Research Centre for Living with Autism (Autism CRC), Brisbane, Queensland, Australia.
    Urbanowicz, Anna
    Cooperative Research Centre for Living with Autism (Autism CRC), Brisbane, Queensland, Australia.
    Trollor, Julian N.
    Department of Developmental Disability Neuropsychiatry (3DN), UNSW Sydney, New South Wales, Australia.
    Cohort profile: The Australian Longitudinal Study of Adults with Autism2019In: BMJ Open, E-ISSN 2044-6055, Vol. 9, no 12, article id e030798Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PURPOSE: There is a significant knowledge gap regarding the lives of adults on the autism spectrum. Some literature suggests significant health and mental health inequalities for autistic adults, yet there is a lack of comprehensive longitudinal studies exploring risk factors. Further, most research does not include the perspective of autistic adults in its conduct or design. Here, we describe the baseline characteristics and inclusive research approach of a nationwide longitudinal study. ​

    PARTICIPANTS: The Autism Cooperative Research Centre for Living with Autism's Australian Longitudinal Study of Adults with Autism (ALSAA) is a questionnaire-based longitudinal study of autistic adults (25+ years old) with follow-up at 2-year intervals. Autistic advisors were involved in each stage of research apart from data analysis. Three questionnaires were developed: self-report, informant report (ie, proxy report) and carers (ie, carer experiences and characteristics). ​

    FINDINGS TO DATE: An inclusive research protocol was developed and agreed with autistic advisors. Baseline data were collected from 295 autistic adults (M=41.8 years, SD=12.0) including 42 informant responses, 146 comparison participants and 102 carers. The majority of autistic participants (90%) had been diagnosed in adulthood (M=35.3 years, SD=15.1). When compared with controls, autistic adults scored higher on self-report measures of current depression and anxiety. Participant comments informed ongoing data gathering. Participants commented on questionnaire length, difficulty with literal interpretation of forced response items and expressed gratitude for research in this area.

    ​FUTURE PLANS: A large comprehensive dataset relating to autistic adults and their carers has been gathered, creating a good platform for longitudinal follow-up repeat surveys and collaborative research. Several outputs are in development, with focus on health service barriers and usage, caregivers, impact of diagnosis in adulthood, further scale validations, longitudinal analyses of loneliness, suicidal ideation, mental illness risk factors and other areas. Baseline data confirm poorer mental health of autistic adults. The ALSAA demonstrates a working approach to inclusive research.

  • 14. Bengtsson Tops, Anita
    et al.
    Schmidt, Manuela
    Kristianstad University, Sweden; Lund University, Sweden.
    Development and implementation of a need-based care model for persons that frequently visit psychiatric emergency rooms2017Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 15.
    Berglund, Kristina J.
    et al.
    Department of Psychology, University of Gothenburg.
    Balldin, Jan
    Department of Psychiatry and Neurochemistry of the Sahlgrenska Academy at the University of Gothenburg .
    Berggren, Ulf
    Department of Psychiatry and Neurochemistry of the Sahlgrenska Academy at the University of Gothenburg .
    Gerdner, Arne
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. SALVE (Social challenges, Actors, Living conditions, reseach VEnue). Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Behavioural Science and Social Work.
    Fahlke, Claudia
    Department of Psychology, University of Gothenburg .
    Childhood Maltreatment Affects the Serotonergic System in Male Alcohol-Dependent Individuals2013In: Alcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research, ISSN 0145-6008, E-ISSN 1530-0277, Vol. 37, no 5, p. 757-762Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Reduced central serotonergic neurotransmission has been demonstrated in individuals with excessive alcohol consumption and/or alcohol dependence. Childhood maltreatment has also been found to have a negative impact on central serotonergic neurotransmission. The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of childhood maltreatment on central serotonergic dysfunction in alcohol-dependent individuals.

    Methods: Adult men with a diagnosis of alcohol dependence (n=18) were recruited from outpatient treatment units for alcoholism. Central serotonergic neurotransmission was assessed by a neuroendocrine method, that is, the prolactin (PRL) response to the selective 5-HT reuptake inhibitor citalopram. Childhood maltreatment was assessed retrospectively by the Childhood Trauma Questionnaire.

    Results: Alcohol-dependent individuals with childhood experience of emotional abuse had significantly lower PRL response compared with those without such abuse (3 +/- 5 and 64 +/- 24mU/l, respectively; t=6.51, p<0.001). Among those who reported childhood emotional abuse, 4 of 7 individuals had flat PRL responses in comparison with none in those with no report of such abuse (p<0.01).

    Conclusions: This is the first study to show that self-reported childhood maltreatment, in particular emotional abuse, in male alcohol-dependent individuals is associated with a quite dramatic (more than 90%) reduction in central serotonergic neurotransmission. It should, however, be noted that the number of individuals is relatively small, and the results should therefore be considered as preliminary.

  • 16.
    Bjereld, Ylva
    et al.
    Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Augustine, Lilly
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Turner, Russell
    Department of Social Work, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Löfstedt, Petra
    Department of Public Health and Community Medicine, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Ng, Kwok
    Physical Activity for Health Research Centre, Department of Physical Education and Sport Sciences, University of Limerick, Ireland; School of Educational Sciences and Psychology, University of Eastern Finland, Finland.
    The association between self-reported psychosomatic complaints and bullying victimisation and disability among adolescents in Finland and Sweden2023In: Scandinavian Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1403-4948, E-ISSN 1651-1905, Vol. 51, no 8, p. 1136-1143Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: To analyse the associations between bullying victimisation, disability, and self-reported psychosomatic complaints in adolescents, and to investigate the role of support from parents and teachers in such associations.

    Methods: The study was based on Finnish and Swedish data from two waves (2013/2014 and 2017/2018) of the Health Behaviour in School-aged Children survey (n=16,057). Descriptive statistics were produced for four groups of adolescents: (a) bullied with disabilities; (b) not bullied with disabilities; (c) bullied without disabilities; and (d) not bullied without disabilities (reference group). Two multilevel multinomial logistic regression models were performed for the Finnish and Swedish samples separately. The first model analysed associations between psychosomatic complaints and bullying victimisation, controlling for a range of confounders. The second model analysed associations between psychosomatic complaints and social support from parents and teachers.

    Results: Across both countries, bullied adolescents with disabilities were more likely to self-report psychosomatic complaints than the reference group, even after adjusting for other potential confounders. Teacher support was identified as a potential protective factor as the odds ratio for psychosomatic complaints decreased when including teacher support as a factor in the model. The association with parent support showed mixed findings in Finland and Sweden.

    Conclusions: Disability in combination with bullying victimisation generated the highest levels of self-reported psychosomatic complaints compared to adolescents that were not bullied nor had disabilities. High teacher support may be a protective factor against psychosomatic complaints for bullied and/or disabled adolescents.

  • 17.
    Björgvinsdóttir, Erna
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Effect of methylphenidate treatment as an intervention for children diagnosed with ASD showing ADHD symptoms: Systematic Review2023Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD), previously known as Pervasive Development Disorder (PDD) is a developmental disorder present from early childhood. Children diagnosed with ASD commonly exhibit symptoms of ADHD resulting in increased severity of symptoms and impairment of functioning. This group of children is frequently treated with methylphenidate which has been recommended by some but criticised by others. This systematic review aims to explore the effect of methylphenidate treatment on symptoms of ASD, functioning and adverse effects  Six articles were extracted from five different databases (Medline, Psych INFO, PubMed, Scopus, and Web of Science) and chosen based on a pre-determined inclusion and exclusion criteria. The results show that MPH treatment may be successful as an intervention for some children with ASD showing ADHD symptoms while other children are very susceptible to adverse effects with some being unable to tolerate the treatment. The chosen studies provided limited acknowledgement of the effect on functioning making it an important focus for future research. It is important that professionals are aware of the negative effects MPH might cause to ensure a positive outcome and well-being for children with this disorder. There is a need for further understanding of the connection between ASD and ADHD with additional exploration of possible moderators such as IQ, dose size and level of functioning.  

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 18.
    Bonin, Maria
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication.
    Augustine, Lilly
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Meng, Qi
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Beyond silence: A scoping review of provided support for grieving children with intellectual disabilities or autism spectrum disorder2024In: Omega, ISSN 0030-2228, E-ISSN 1541-3764Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Children with intellectual disabilities (ID) or autism spectrum disorder (ASD) are considered unable to grieve or understand the concept of death and might not receive grief support after the death of a beloved person; hence, they are at risk of developing complicated grief. This scoping review identified existing grief support for children with ID or ASD. Searching seven databases yielded 514 records; six studies met the predefined inclusion criteria. The six studies identified grief support, including discussions, participation in death rituals, family support, stories, and professional interventions. The support could be organized into three levels, micro, meso, and exo, overlooking the macro level completely, indicating that grief support for these children tends to be irregular and inconsistent.

  • 19.
    Bruce, C. R.
    et al.
    Occupational Therapy, School of Allied Health, La Trobe University, Melbourne, VIC, Australia.
    Unsworth, Carolyn
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation. Occupational Therapy, School of Allied Health, La Trobe University, Melbourne, VIC, Australia.
    Dillon, M. P.
    Prosthetics and Orthotics, School of Allied Health, La Trobe University, Melbourne, VIC, Australia.
    Tay, R.
    School of Business IT & Logistcs, RMIT University, Melbourne, VIC, Australia.
    Falkmer, Torbjörn
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. School of Occupational Therapy and Social Work, Faculty of Health Sciences, Curtin University, Perth, WA, Australia.
    Bird, P.
    The Gosforth Clinic, Maroochydore QLD, Australia.
    Carey, L. M.
    Occupational Therapy, School of Allied Health, La Trobe University, Melbourne, VIC, Australia.
    Hazard perception skills of young drivers with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) can be improved with computer based driver training: An exploratory randomised controlled trial2017In: Accident Analysis and Prevention, ISSN 0001-4575, E-ISSN 1879-2057, Vol. 109, p. 70-77Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Young drivers with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) are at higher risk of road traffic injuries than their peers. Increased risk correlates with poor hazard perception skill. Few studies have investigated hazard perception training using computer technology with this group of drivers.

    Objectives

    *Determine the presence and magnitude of the between-group and within- subject change in hazard perception skills in young drivers with ADHD who receive Drive Smart training. *Determine whether training-facilitated change in hazard perception is maintained over time.

    Methods

    This was a feasibility study, randomised control trial conducted in Australia. The design included a delayed treatment for the control group. Twenty-five drivers with a diagnosis of ADHD were randomised to the Immediate Intervention or Delayed Intervention group.The Immediate Intervention group received a training session using a computer application entitled Drive Smart. The Delayed Intervention group watched a documentary video initially (control condition), followed by the Drive Smart computer training session. The participant’s hazard perception skill was measured using the Hazard Perception Test (HPT).

    Findings

    After adjusting for baseline scores, there was a significant betweengroup difference in post-intervention HPT change scores in favour of the Immediate Intervention group. The magnitude of the effect was large. There was no significant within-group delayed intervention effect. A significant maintenance effect was found at 6-week follow-up for the Immediate Intervention group.

    Conclusions

    The hazard perception skills of participants improved following training with large effect size and some maintenance of gain. A multimodal approach to training is indicated to facilitate maintenance. A full-scale trial is feasible.

  • 20.
    Bruce, C.
    et al.
    La Trobe University, Melbourne, Australia.
    Unsworth, Carolyn
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation. La Trobe University, Melbourne, Australia.
    Dillon, M.
    La Trobe University, Melbourne, Australia.
    Tay, R.
    RMIT University, Melbourne, Australia.
    Falkmer, Torbjörn
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. La Trobe University, Melbourne, Australia.
    Bird, P.
    The Gosforth Clinic, Maroochydore, Australia.
    Carey, L.
    La Trobe University, Melbourne, Australia.
    Hazard Perception Skills Of Young Drivers With Attention-Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder Can Be Improved With Computer-Based Training: A Feasibility Trial2017In: Australian and New Zealand journal of psychiatry (Print), ISSN 0004-8674, E-ISSN 1440-1614, Vol. 51, no Suppl. 1, p. 122-122Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Young drivers with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) are at higher risk of road traffic injuries than their peers. Increased risk correlates with poor hazard perception skill. Few studies have investigated hazard perception training using computer applications such as DriveSmart with this group of drivers.

    Objectives: To: determine the magnitude of the between-group and within-subject change in hazard perception skills among young drivers with ADHD-exposed/delayed exposure to DriveSmart training and determine whether training-facilitated change in hazard perception is maintained over time.

    Methods: Australian feasibility study. Twenty-five drivers with a diagnosis of ADHD were randomized to the intervention or control group. Participants in the intervention group received a computer training session using DriveSmart, while the control group watched a documentary video. The design included a delayed treatment for the control group. The participants’ hazard perception skill was measured on the University of Queensland Hazard Perception Test (HPT) post training and at 6-week follow-up.

    Findings: After adjusting for baseline scores, there was a significant between-group difference (p = 0.023, partial η2 = 0.212) and a significant within-subject difference post intervention in the experimental group. There was no significant difference between post intervention and 6-week follow-up scores in the experimental group.

    Conclusions: The hazard perception skills of participants improved following training and were largely sustained. We found a large effect size consistent with one prior study. A full-scale trial is feasible.

  • 21.
    Bülow, Per
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Behavioural Science and Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. SALVE (Social challenges, Actors, Living conditions, reseach VEnue). Psykiatriska kliniken, Länssjukhuset Ryhov, Jönköping.
    Läkemedel och vardagsliv2016In: Från patient till person: Om allvarliga psykiska problem - vardag, vård och stöd / [ed] Gunnel Andersson, Per Bülow, Anne Denhov, Alain Topor, Lund, 2016, p. 171-205Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 22.
    Bülow, Per
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Behavioural Science and Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. SALVE (Social challenges, Actors, Living conditions, reseach VEnue). Psykiatriska kliniken, Länssjukhuset Ryhov, Jönköping.
    Samhällets respons på allvarliga psykiska problem: Från tidigmodern tid till nutid2016In: Från patient till person: Om allvarliga psykiska problem - vardag, vård och stöd / [ed] Gunnel Andersson, Per Bülow, Anne Denhov, Alain Topor, Lund, 2016, p. 51-68Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 23.
    Bülow, Per
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Behavioural Science and Social Work. Psychiatric Clinic, County Hospital Ryhov, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Andersson, Gunnel
    Research and Development Unit, FoU Södertörn, Tumba, Sweden.
    Denhov, Anne
    Research and Development Unit, Psychiatry South Stockholm, Johanneshov, Sweden.
    Topor, Alain
    Research and Development Unit, Psychiatry South Stockholm, Johanneshov, Sweden.
    Experience of psychotropic medication – An interview study of persons with psychosis2016In: Issues in Mental Health Nursing, ISSN 0161-2840, E-ISSN 1096-4673, Vol. 37, no 11, p. 820-828Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Psychotropic drugs, particularly antipsychotic types, are a cornerstone of the treatment of people with psychosis. Despite numerous studies showing that drug treatment with psychotropic drugs initially alleviates psychiatric symptoms, the proportion of people with mental health problems and symptoms that do not follow doctors' prescriptions, thus exhibiting so-called non-adherence, is considerable. Non-adherence is predominantly seen as a clinical feature and as a patient characteristic that is especially due to patients' poor understanding that they are ill. There is also a widespread notion that non-adherence is of great disadvantage to the patient. This article is based on interviews with 19 persons diagnosed with psychosis. It challenges the notion of patients being either adherent or non-adherent to the doctor's orders. The findings show that persons with psychosis are active agents when it comes to adjusting medication. The interviewees created their own strategies to gain power over treatment with psychotropic drugs. The most common strategies were to adjust the doses or take breaks of varying lengths from the medication. These deviations from prescriptions were important to conceal, not only from their own psychiatrists, but from all psychiatric staff.

  • 24.
    Bülow, Pia H.
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. SALVE (Social challenges, Actors, Living conditions, reseach VEnue). Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT.
    Topor, A.
    Department of Psychosocial Health, University of Agder, Kristiansand, Norway.
    Andersson, G.
    Department of Social Work, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Denhov, A.
    Stockholm, Sweden.
    Stefansson, C. -G.
    Department of Social Work, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    The Stockholm Follow-up Study of Users Diagnosed with Psychosis (SUPP): A 10-year Follow-up 2004–20132021In: Community mental health journal, ISSN 0010-3853, E-ISSN 1573-2789, Vol. 57, p. 1121-1129Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Since the 1970s, psychiatric care in the western world has undergone fundamental changes known as de-institutionalisation. This has changed the living conditions for people with severe mental illness. The purpose of this study was to investigate the living conditions and utilisation of care and social services for a group of people in Sweden with diagnosis of psychosis over a 10-year period, 2004–2013. During this period, psychiatric care decreased at the same time as interventions from the social services increased. Half of the persons in the studied group did not have any institutional care, that is, neither been hospitalised nor dwelling in supported housing, during the last 5 years, and just over 20% had no contact with either psychiatry or the municipality's social services during the last 2 years of the investigated period.

  • 25.
    Carlén, K.
    et al.
    School of Health Sciences, University of Skövde, Sweden.
    Suominen, S.
    School of Health Sciences, University of Skövde, Sweden.
    Augustine, Lilly
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Saarinen, M.
    Department of Child Neurology and General Practice, University of Turku, Finland.
    Aromaa, M.
    Department of Public Health, University of Turku, Turku, Finland.
    Rautava, P.
    Department of Public Health, University of Turku, Turku University Hospital, Turku, Finland.
    Sourander, A.
    Department of Child Psychiatry, University of Turku, Turku, Finland.
    Sillanpää, M.
    Departments of Child Neurology and General Practice, University of Turku, Turku University Hospital, Turku, Finland.
    Teenagers’ mental health problems predict probable mental diagnosis among girls, but what about the boys?2023In: Population Medicine, ISSN 2654-1459, Vol. 5, article id A1042Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background and Objectives: Adolescents’ mental health is a public health concern. The prevalence of mental disorders is increasing, and there seems to be a gender difference, with girls reporting more mental health problems than boys, especially regarding internalizing problems. Most mental disorders debut early but often remain untreated into adulthood. Therefore, early detection of mental disorders is essential. The study aimed to estimate to what extent teenagers’ self-reports of mental health problems predict probable mental diagnoses as they enter adulthood, particularly regarding gender differences. Methods: Self-reported mental health problems, Youth Self-Report (YSR) at 15 years (n = 504) from the ongoing Finnish family competence study (FFC) using modified multivariable Poisson regression analysis for prediction of DAWBA (Development and Wellbeing Assessment) interview outcomes 3 years later. Results: Recently published Results (Carlén et al., 2022) showed that one unit’s increase in YSR was estimated to correspond to an increase in the relative risk of a probable DAWBA-based diagnosis by 3.3% [RR (95% CI) 1.03 (1.03–1.04), p < 0.001]. In gender-specific analysis, the Findings applied, particularly to girls. Conclusions: Youth Self-Report (YSR) scores at pubertal age predicted the risk of a probable mental diagnosis at the onset of adulthood, particularly for girls. Further research is needed to explain the lower sensitivity of YSR among boys.

  • 26.
    Carlén, Kristina
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Predictors of mental health in adolescents – with a salutogenic perspective2022Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Mental health in adolescence is an increasing public health concern. Over half of all mental disorders debut by 14 years of age and remain largely untreated up to adulthood, which underlines the importance of early detection. Mental health is a complex concept that consists of both mental well-being and mental ill-health (including mental health problems and mental disorders). However, the development of mental health during the transition period from childhood to adulthood is dependent on the coping strategies used to meet everyday stressors. Therefore, the framework is salutogenic, looking at the world from a resource perspective to promote mental well-being. However, finding predictors also include identifying risk factors of mental ill-health.

    The overall aim of the thesis was to investigate predictors of mental health in adolescents from a longitudinal perspective. The Finnish Family Competence (FFC) study was used with adolescents at 15 years of age and their parents, with a follow-up at 18 years of age. Also, Swedish data material was used, The Longitudinal Research on Development In Adolescence (LoRDIA) with adolescents at 12-13 years and a follow-up at 17 years. In sub-studies I, II, and III the outcome was a probable mental health diagnosis determined by a standardised Development and Well-being Assessment (DAWBA) interview. In sub-study IV the outcome was perceived mental health status (MHS).

    The results showed that a strong sense of coherence was associated with a decreased risk for subsequent mental disorders (sub-study I) and that self-esteem was negatively associated with future mental well-being (sub-study IV). Further, low levels of mental health problems reported by the adolescents (sub-study II) or by their parents (sub-study III) were related to a decreased risk for subsequent mental disorders. There was a gender aspect that affected the results and which showed girls as having more internal mental health problems or mental disorders. Other factors indicating an increased risk of mental ill-health were parental low age at childbirth and socioeconomic factors such as the mother’s low educational level, father’s blue-collar profession, and a poor economic situation in the family.

    The results from this thesis underline the importance of having a salutogenic approach when dealing with mental health in adolescence to identify copingresources for stressors in Antonovsky’s ‘River of Life’. The school might be an arena for creating interventions with a resource perspective for strengthening a sense of coherence and self-esteem, and for alleviating perceived mental health problems.

    Download full text (pdf)
    Kappa
    Download (png)
    Cover
  • 27.
    Carlén, Kristina
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Suominen, S.
    School of Health Sciences, University of Skövde, Skövde, Sweden.
    Lindmark, Ulrika
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Centre for Oral Health. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ARN-J (Aging Research Network - Jönköping).
    Saarinen, M. M.
    Department of General Practice, University of Turku and Turku University Hospital, Turku, Finland.
    Aromaa, M.
    University of Turku, Department of Public Health, Turku, Finland.
    Rautava, P.
    University of Turku, Department of Public Health, Turku, Finland.
    Sillanpää, M.
    Department of General Practice, University of Turku and Turku University Hospital, Turku, Finland.
    Sense of coherence predicts adolescent mental health2020In: Journal of Affective Disorders, ISSN 0165-0327, E-ISSN 1573-2517, Vol. 274, p. 1206-1210Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Strong sense of coherence (SOC) has been shown to predict good mental health among adults whereas its predictive value in adolescence is unclear. This life-course oriented prospective study explores whether SOC predicts mental health in a three-year follow-up. Methods: The data is part of the ongoing ‘Finnish Family Competence Study’ launched in 1986 in southwestern Finland (baseline n = 1287). The outcome variable was adolescent's mental health at 18 years of age, measured on the Development and Well-Being Assessment (DAWBA) scale. The main predictor was Antonovsky's SOC score (1987) measured at the age of 15. A total of 498 adolescents were included in the present analyses. Poisson regression was used by univariate and multivariable models using the parents’ age and socioeconomic status and adolescents’ gender as covariates. Results: Multivariable analysis showed that a one-unit increase in SOC decreased the relative risk of a DAWBA-based diagnosis by 4 % (RR [95% CI] 0.96 [0.94–0.98], p < 0.001). Limitations: Typical of very long follow-up, as in our study of nearly two decades, a substantial proportion of the original population-based cohort was lost to follow-up weakening the representability of our cohort. Conclusions: Sense of coherence is a useful and clinically sensitive tool to predict mental health in adolescence. The easily administered, coping-oriented SOC questionnaire is an appropriate instrument in screening for adolescents who would benefit from supportive measures to strengthen their mental well-being.

  • 28.
    Carlén, Kristina
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. School of Health Sciences, University of Skövde, Skövde, Sweden.
    Suominen, Sakari
    School of Health Sciences, University of Skövde, Skövde, Sweden; Department of Public Health, University of Turku and Turku University Hospital, Turku, Finland.
    Augustine, Lilly
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    The association between adolescents’ self-esteem and perceived mental health status in Sweden in four years of follow-up2022Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 29.
    Carlén, Kristina
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. School of Health Sciences, University of Skövde, Skövde, Sweden.
    Suominen, Sakari
    School of Health Sciences, University of Skövde, Skövde, Sweden; Department of Public Health, University of Turku and Turku University Hospital, Turku, Finland.
    Augustine, Lilly
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Saarinen, Maiju M.
    Departments of Child Neurology and General Practice, University of Turku and Turku University Hospital, Turku, Finland.
    Aromaa, Minna
    Department of Public Health, University of Turku and Turku University Hospital, Turku, Finland; City of Turku Welfare Division, Turku, Finland.
    Rautava, Päivi
    Department of Public Health, University of Turku and Turku University Hospital, Turku, Finland; City of Turku Welfare Division, Turku, Finland.
    Sourander, André
    Department of Child Psychiatry, University of Turku, Turku, Finland; Department of Child Psychiatry, Turku University Hospital, Turku, Finland.
    Sillanpää, Matti
    Departments of Child Neurology and General Practice, University of Turku and Turku University Hospital, Turku, Finland.
    Teenagers' mental health problems predict probable mental diagnosis 3 years later among girls, but what about the boys?2022In: Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and Mental Health, E-ISSN 1753-2000, Vol. 16, no 1, article id 41Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    The prevalence of mental disorders is increasing, and there seems to be a gender difference in prevalence, with girls reporting more mental health problems than boys, especially regarding internalizing problems. Most mental disorders debut early but often remain untreated into adulthood. Early detection of mental disorders is essential for successful treatment, which is not always happening. The study aimed to estimate to what extent teenagers' self-reports predict probable mental diagnosis as they enter adulthood, particularly regarding gender differences.

    Methods

    Self-reported mental health problems, Youth Self-Report (YSR) at 15 years (range 3-110, n = 504) from the ongoing Finnish family competence study (FFC) using modified multivariable Poisson regression analysis for prediction of DAWBA (Development and Wellbeing Assessment) interview outcomes 3 years later.

    Results

    One unit's increase in YSR was estimated to correspond to an increase in the relative risk of a probable DAWBA-based diagnosis by 3.3% [RR (95% CI) 1.03 (1.03-1.04), p < 0.001]. In gender-specific analysis, the findings applied, particularly to girls.

    Conclusions

    Youth Self-Report (YSR) scores at pubertal age predicted the risk of a probable mental diagnosis at the onset of adulthood, particularly in girls. Further research is needed to explain the lower sensitivity of YSR among boys.

  • 30.
    Castelpietra, Giulio
    et al.
    Primary Care Service Area, Friuli Venezia Giulia Region, Trieste, Italy.
    Salvador-Carulla, Luis
    Centre for Mental Health Research, Australian National University (ANU), Canberra, Australia.
    Almborg, Ann-Helene
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, The Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare. Nordic WHO-FIC Collaborating Centre, Oslo, Norway.
    Fernandez, Ana Isabel
    Community Health Service, Public Health Agency of Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain.
    Madden, Richard Cawley
    National Centre for Classification in Health, University of Sydney, Australia Received 8 August 2017; accepted 9 October 2017 Available online 7 November 2017 KEYWORDS Mental.
    Working draft: Classifications of interventions in mental health care. An expert review2017In: European Journal of Psychiatry, ISSN 0213-6163, E-ISSN 2340-4469, Vol. 31, no 4, p. 127-144Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background and objectives: Specific classifications of mental health interventions have encountered many issues in their integration into a general classification of interventions. Nonetheless, there has not been any previous review on the content and structure of current classifications in relation to mental health care. This expert review aimed to compare the mental health interventions provided in a series of reference classification systems for the incorporation of mental health care into the International Classification of Health Interventions (ICHI).

    Methods: Twelve classifications are described with regards to the structure of the classification (unit of analysis, sections, multiaxiality, granularity) and context of utilization (purpose, descriptors, neutrality, interoperability and implementation).

    Results: Major problems identified include a granularity unbalance (i.e. differences in the number of codes and its specificity with other areas such as rehabilitation), unclear units of analysis (i.e. differences between procedures, interventions, packages of care and care programs), lack of clearly stated evidence-based interventions in a mental health context; and lack of a well-defined taxonomical tree. An ontology approach to the definition of the different entities involved in the throughput of mental care, including their hierarchical relationships and conceptual map, may have contributed to the failure of previous systems together with the development of systems to classify mental health interventions separate from generic health interventions.

    Conclusions: The present review provides additional ground for the development of the ICHI knowledge-base and highlights the importance of taxonomical disambiguation and international comparability in the development and implementation of classifications of mental care interventions. 

  • 31.
    Cervantes Mori, Milagros D.
    et al.
    Högskolan i Skövde, Institutionen för informationsteknologi.
    Kävrestad, Joakim
    Högskolan i Skövde, Institutionen för informationsteknologi.
    Nohlberg, Marcus
    Högskolan i Skövde, Institutionen för informationsteknologi.
    Success factors and challenges in digital forensics for law enforcement in Sweden2021In: Proceedings of the 7th International Workshop on Socio-Technical Perspective in IS Development (STPIS 2021): Virtual conference in Trento, Italy, October 11-12, 2021 / [ed] Peter Bednar; Alexander Nolte; Mikko Rajanen; Anna Sigridur Islind; Helena Vallo Hult; Fatema Zaghloul; Aurelio Ravarini; Alessio Maria Braccini, CEUR-WS , 2021, p. 100-116Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The widespread use of communication and digital technology has affected the number of devices requiring analysis in criminal investigations. Additionally, the increase in storage volume, the diversity of digital devices, and the use of cloud environments introduce more complexities to the digital forensic domain. This work aims to supply a taxonomy of the main challenges and success factors faced in the digital forensic domain in law enforcement. The chosen method for this research is a systematic literature review of studies with topics related to success factors and challenges in digital forensics for law enforcement. The candidate studies were 1,428 peer-reviewed scientific articles published between 2015 and 2021. A total of twenty-eight primary studies were analyzed by applying thematic coding. Furthermore, a survey of digital forensic practitioners from the Swedish Police was held to triangulate the results achieved with the systematic literature review. 

    Download full text (pdf)
    FULLTEXT01
  • 32.
    Chang, Ching-Wen
    et al.
    Graduate Institute of Social Work, National Taiwan Normal University, Taipei, Taiwan.
    Chen, Jung-Sheng
    Department of Medical Research, E-Da Hospital, I-Shou University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan.
    Huang, Shih-Wei
    Institute of Environmental Toxin and Emerging Contaminant, Cheng Shiu University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan; Center for Environmental Toxin and Emerging-contaminant Research, Cheng Shiu University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan.
    Potenza, Marc N.
    Department of Psychiatry, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, CT, USA; Connecticut Mental Health Center, New Haven, CT, USA; Connecticut Council on Problem Gambling, Wethersfield, CT, USA; Child Study Center, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, CT, USA; Department of Neuroscience, Yale University, New Haven, CT, USA; Wu Tsai Institute, Yale University, New Haven, CT, USA.
    Su, Jian-An
    Department of Psychiatry, Chiayi Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Chiayi, Taiwan; School of Medicine, Chang Gung University, Taoyuan, Taiwan; Department of Nursing, Chang Gung Institute of Technology, Taoyuan, Taiwan.
    Chang, Kun-Chia
    Department of General Psychiatry, Jianan Psychiatric Center, Ministry of Health and Welfare, Tainan, Taiwan; Department of Psychiatry, National Cheng Kung University Hospital, College of Medicine, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan, Taiwan.
    Pakpour, Amir H.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Department of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, The Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare.
    Lin, Chung-Ying
    Institute of Allied Health Sciences, College of Medicine, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan, Taiwan; Biostatistics Consulting Center, National Cheng Kung University Hospital, College of Medicine, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan, Taiwan; Department of Public Health, College of Medicine, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan, Taiwan; Department of Occupational Therapy, College of Medicine, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan, Taiwan.
    Problematic smartphone use and two types of problematic use of the internet and self-stigma among people with substance use disorders2023In: Addictive Behaviours, ISSN 0306-4603, E-ISSN 1873-6327, Vol. 147, article id 107807Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Guided by the Interaction of Person-Affect-Cognition-Execution (I-PACE) model and a self-stigma framework, this study aimed to investigate relationships between cognitive and affective self-stigma and behavioral self-stigma, problematic use of internet (PUI), and problematic smartphone use (PSU) among people with substance use disorders (SUDs). It also examined mediating roles for affective self-stigma in the relationships between cognitive self-stigma and behavioral self-stigma/PUI/PSU.

    METHODS: Using a cross-sectional design, 530 participants diagnosed with SUDs in Taiwan were recruited from a psychiatric center in Taiwan. Mediation models were investigated using the Hayes' Process Macro Model 4.

    RESULTS: Mediation analyses indicated that cognitive self-stigma was directly associated with behavioral self-stigma (p < 0.001), but not with either types of PUI or PSU (p-values ranging from 0.41 to 0.76). Affective self-stigma was directly related to behavioral self-stigma (p < 0.001), two types of PUI, and PSU (β = 0.24-0.30; all p < 0.001); cognitive self-stigma was indirectly associated with behavioral self-stigma (β = 0.53; 95  % bootstrapping CI = 0.46, 0.60), two types of PUI, and PSU (β = 0.20-0.25; 95  % bootstrapping CI = 0.08-0.14, 0.31-0.37) via a mediating effect of affective self-stigma.

    DISCUSSION AND CONCLUSION: Findings support the I-PACE model in a self-stigma context. The findings also suggest that addressing affective self-stigma may help prevent or reduce behavioral self-stigma, PUI, and PSU among people with SUDs. Longitudinal studies are warranted to investigate over time relationships between self-stigma and PUI/PSU in people with SUDs.

  • 33.
    Chang, K. -C
    et al.
    Department Of General Psychiatry, Jianan Psychiatric Center, Ministry Of Health And Welfare, Tainan, Taiwan.
    Chang, Y. -H
    Institute Of Genomics And Bioinformatics, National Chung Hsing University, Taichung, Taiwan.
    Yen, C. -F
    Department Of Psychiatry, School Of Medicine College Of Medicine, Kaohsiung Medical University, Kaohsiung, 802, Taiwan.
    Chen, J. -S
    Department Of Medical Research, E-Da Hospital, Kaohsiung, 824, Taiwan.
    Chen, P. -J
    Department Of Medical Research, E-Da Hospital, Kaohsiung City, 824005, Taiwan.
    Lin, C. -Y
    Institute Of Allied Health Sciences, College Of Medicine, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan, 701401, Taiwan.
    Griffiths, M. D.
    International Gaming Research Unit, Psychology Department, Nottingham Trent University, Nottingham, United Kingdom.
    Potenza, M. N.
    Departments Of Psychiatry And Neuroscience, Child Study Center, School Of Medicine, Yale University, New Haven, CT, United States.
    Pakpour, Amir H.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dept. of Nursing Science.
    A longitudinal study of the effects of problematic smartphone use on social functioning among people with schizophrenia: Mediating roles for sleep quality and self-stigma2022In: Journal of Behavioral Addictions, ISSN 2062-5871, E-ISSN 2063-5303, Vol. 11, no 2, p. 567-576Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background and aims: Individuals with schizophrenia may often experience poor sleep, self-stigma, impaired social functions, and problematic smartphone use. However, the temporal relationships between these factors have not been investigated. The present study used a longitudinal design to examine potential mediating roles of poor sleep and self-stigma in associations between problematic smartphone use and impaired social functions among individuals with schizophrenia. Methods: From April 2019 to August 2021, 193 individuals with schizophrenia (mean [SD] age = 41.34 [9.01] years; 88 [45.6%] males) were recruited and asked to complete three psychometric scales: the Smartphone Application-Based Addiction Scale to assess problematic smartphone use; the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index to assess sleep quality; and the Self-Stigma Scale-Short Scale to assess self-stigma. Social functioning was evaluated by a psychiatrist using the Personal and Social Performance Scale. All measures were assessed five times (one baseline and four follow-ups) at three-month intervals between assessments. Results: General estimating equations found that problematic smartphone use (coefficient =-0.096, SE = 0.021; P < 0.001), sleep quality (coefficient =-0.134, SE = 0.038; P < 0.001), and self-stigma (coefficient =-0.612, SE = 0.192; P = 0.001) were significant statistical predictors for social functioning. Moreover, sleep quality and self-stigma mediated associations between problematic smartphone use and social functioning. Conclusion: Problematic smartphone use appears to impact social functioning longitudinally among individuals with schizophrenia via poor sleep and self-stigma concerns. Interventions aimed at reducing problematic smartphone use, improving sleep, and addressing self-stigma may help improve social functioning among individuals with schizophrenia.

  • 34.
    Chen, Chao-Ying
    et al.
    Chang Gung Univ, Coll Med, Sch Phys Therapy, Taoyuan, Taiwan.;Chang Gung Univ, Grad Inst Rehabil Sci, Coll Med, Taoyuan, Taiwan.;New Taipei City Tucheng Hosp, Chang Gung Med Fdn, Dept Pediat Internal Med, New Taipei, Taiwan..
    Lee, Kuan-Ying
    Minist Hlth & Welf, Dept Child & Adolescent Psychiat, Jianan Psychiat Ctr, Tainan, Taiwan..
    Fung, Xavier C. C.
    Hong Kong Polytech Univ, Fac Hlth & Social Sci, Dept Rehabil Sci, Hung Hom, Hong Kong, Peoples R China..
    Chen, Ji-Kang
    Chinese Univ Hong Kong, Dept Social Work, Hong Kong, Peoples R China..
    Lai, Yu-Chen
    Chia Yi Christian Hosp, Ditmanson Med Fdn Chia, Div Colon & Rectal Surg, Chiayi 621, Taiwan..
    Potenza, Marc N.
    Yale Sch Med, Dept Psychiat, New Haven, CT USA.;Connecticut Mental Hlth Ctr, New Haven, CT USA.;Connecticut Council Problem Gambling, Wethersfield, CT USA.;Yale Sch Med, Child Study Ctr, New Haven, CT USA.;Yale Univ, Dept Neurosci, New Haven, CT USA.;Yale Univ, Wu Tsai Inst, New Haven, CT USA..
    Chang, Kun-Chia
    Minist Hlth & Welf, Dept Gen Psychiat, Jianan Psychiat Ctr, Tainan, Taiwan.;Natl Cheng Kung Univ, Natl Cheng Kung Univ Hosp, Coll Med, Dept Psychiat, Tainan, Taiwan..
    Fang, Chuan-Yin
    Chia Yi Christian Hosp, Ditmanson Med Fdn Chia, Div Colon & Rectal Surg, Chiayi 621, Taiwan..
    Pakpour, Amir H.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Department of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, The Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare.
    Lin, Chung-Ying
    Natl Cheng Kung Univ, Inst Allied Hlth Sci, Coll Med, Tainan, Taiwan.;Natl Cheng Kung Univ, Natl Cheng Kung Univ Hosp, Coll Med, Biostat Consulting Ctr, Tainan, Taiwan.;Natl Cheng Kung Univ, Coll Med, Dept Publ Hlth, Tainan, Taiwan.;Natl Cheng Kung Univ, Coll Med, Dept Occupat Therapy, Tainan, Taiwan.;INTI Int Univ, Nilai 71800, Negeri Sembilan, Malaysia..
    Problematic Use of Internet Associates with Poor Quality of Life via Psychological Distress in Invididuals with ADHD2024In: Psychology Research and Behavior Management, E-ISSN 1179-1578, Vol. 17, p. 443-455Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Problematic use of internet (PUI) may have negative impacts on psychological distress and quality of life (QoL). This situation might be more profound in people with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) due to poorer behavioral control and regulatory capacity. However, there is little evidence regarding mediated effects in the associations between PUI, psychological distress, and QoL in people with ADHD. Aims: To investigate mediating effects of psychological distress in the associations of problematic smartphone use (PSPU), problematic use of social media (PUSM), and problematic gaming (PG) with QoL in individuals with ADHD. Methods and Procedures: PUI behaviors of participants with ADHD (n = 99) were assessed using the Smartphone ApplicationBased Addiction Scale, Bergen Social Media Addiction Scale, and Internet Gaming Disorder-Short Form. Psychological distress was assessed using the Depression, Anxiety, Stress Scale and QoL using the Kid-KINDL. Outcomes and Results: Psychological distress mediated the associations between PUI and different domains of QoL, except for selfesteem QoL. There were also positively direct effects between PG and physical QoL, PUSM and friends' QoL, and PSPU and physical QoL. Conclusions and Implications: PUI may associate with poor QoL in people with ADHD via psychological distress. Programs on reducing PUI for people with ADHD are needed.

  • 35.
    Chen, I. -H
    et al.
    Chinese Academy of Education Big Data, Qufu Normal University, Shandong, Qufu City, China.
    Chang, K. -C
    Department of General Psychiatry, Jianan Psychiatric Center, Ministry of Health and Welfare, Tainan, Taiwan.
    Chang, C. -W
    Graduate Institute of Social Work, National Taiwan Normal University, Taipei, Taiwan.
    Huang, S. -W
    Institute of Environmental Toxin and Emerging Contaminant, Cheng Shiu University, Kaohsiung, 83347, Taiwan.
    Potenza, M. N.
    Department of Psychiatry, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, CT, United States.
    Pakpour, Amir H.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dept. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, The Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare.
    Lin, C. -Y
    Institute of Allied Health Sciences, College of Medicine, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan, Taiwan.
    Temporal associations between problematic use of the internet and self-stigma among people with substance use disorders: A cross-lagged model across one year2022In: Journal of Psychiatric Research, ISSN 0022-3956, E-ISSN 1879-1379, Vol. 156, p. 339-348Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Self-stigma is a common experience for people with substance use disorders (SUDs). Understanding factors associated with self-stigma may aid in intervention development. This study investigated the reciprocal relationship between three types of problematic use of the internet [PUI; i.e. problematic use of social media (PUSM), problematic smartphone use (PSPU), and problematic gaming (PG)] and self-stigma among people with SUDs. This longitudinal study involved five waves of a survey given to individuals with SUDs in Taiwan. A total of 319 participants (85% male), with a mean age of 42.2 years (SD = 8.9), were recruited. The Smartphone Application-Based Addiction Scale, Bergen Social Media Addiction Scale, Internet Gaming Disorder-Short Form, and Self-Stigma Scale-Short Form were used. No significant associations between PUI and self-stigma were found in early waves (i.e., Waves 1 and 2). The earliest significant finding was identified between Wave 2 PSPU (smartphone) and Wave 3 self-stigma. Additionally, Wave 3 PSPU (smartphone) and PG (gaming) were associated with Wave 4 self-stigma, and Wave 4 PSPU (smartphone), PG (gaming), and PUSM (social media) were associated with Wave 5 self-stigma. Therefore, all three types of PUI (internet) may elevate self-stigma at different time points for individuals with SUDs. However, the reciprocal effects between self-stigma and PUI (internet) only occurred in PUSM (social media) at a later stage (i.e., from Wave 4 to Wave 5). In conclusion, people with SUDs who have PUI (internet) are at increased likelihood of developing more self-stigma, which may then increase subsequent PUSM (social media), forming a vicious cycle. 

  • 36.
    Chen, I-Hua
    et al.
    Chinese Academy of Education Big Data, Qufu Normal University, Shandong, China.
    Strong, Carol
    Department of Public Health, National Cheng Kung University Hospital, College of Medicine, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan, Taiwan.
    Lin, Yi-Ching
    Department of Early Childhood and Family Education, National Taipei University of Education, Taipei, Taiwan.
    Tsai, Meng-Che
    Department of Pediatrics, National Cheng Kung University Hospital, College of Medicine, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan, Taiwan.
    Leung, Hildie
    Department of Applied Social Sciences, Faculty of Health and Social Sciences, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hung Hom, Hong Kong.
    Lin, Chung-Ying
    Department of Rehabilitation Sciences, Faculty of Health and Social Sciences, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hung Hom, Hong Kong.
    Pakpour, Amir H.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Social Determinants of Health Research Center, Qazvin University of Medical Sciences, Qazvin, Iran.
    Griffiths, Mark D.
    International Gaming Research Unit, Psychology Department, Nottingham Trent University, Nottingham, United Kingdom.
    Time invariance of three ultra-brief internet-related instruments: Smartphone Application-Based Addiction Scale (SABAS), Bergen Social Media Addiction Scale (BSMAS), and the nine-item Internet Gaming Disorder Scale- Short Form (IGDS-SF9) (Study Part B).2020In: Addictive Behaviours, ISSN 0306-4603, E-ISSN 1873-6327, Vol. 101, article id 105960Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Given the many technological advances over the past two decades, a small minority of young people are at risk of problematic use or becoming addicted to these technologies (including activities on the internet and smartphones). Many brief psychometric scales have been developed to assess those at risk of problematic use or addiction including the six-item Smartphone Application-Based Addiction Scale [SABAS], the six-item Bergen Social Media Addiction Scale [BSMAS], and the nine-item Internet Gaming Disorder Scale-Short Form [IGDS-SF9]). However, to date, the reproducibility of these three scales has only been examined over a short period of time (e.g., two weeks), and it is unclear whether they are time invariant across a longer period (e.g., three months). Given the emergence of internet and smartphone addiction in Chinese population, the present study translated the three instruments into Chinese and recruited 640 university students (304 from Hong Kong [99 males] and 336 from Taiwan [167 males]) to complete the three scales twice (baseline and three months after baseline). Multigroup confirmatory factor analysis (MGCFA) was applied to examine the time invariance. The intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) was used to assess the relative reliability, and the percentage of smallest real difference (SRD%) was utilized to explore the absolute reliability for the three scales. MGCFA showed that all three scales were time invariant across three months. ICC demonstrated that all the scales were satisfactory in reproducibility (0.82 to 0.94), and SRD% indicated that all the scales had acceptable measurement noise (23.8 to 29.4). In conclusion, the short, valid, reliable, and easy-to-use Chinese SABAS, BSMAS, and IGDS-SF9 show good properties across periods of three months.

  • 37.
    Cheng, Wan-Lin
    et al.
    Chi Mei Med Ctr, Dept Psychiat, 201 Taikang Vil, Tainan 736, Taiwan..
    Chang, Chih-Cheng
    Chi Mei Med Ctr, Dept Psychiat, 201 Taikang Vil, Tainan 736, Taiwan.;Chang Jung Christian Univ, Dept Hlth Psychol, Tainan, Taiwan..
    Griffiths, Mark D.
    Nottingham Trent Univ, Psychol Dept, Int Gaming Res Unit, Nottingham, England..
    Yen, Cheng-Fang
    Kaohsiung Med Univ, Sch Med, Dept Psychiat, Coll Med, Kaohsiung, Taiwan.;Kaohsiung Med Univ Hosp, Dept Psychiat, Kaohsiung, Taiwan.;Natl Pingtung Univ Sci & Technol, Coll Profess Studies, Pingtung, Taiwan..
    Liu, Jiun-Horng
    Chi Mei Med Ctr, Dept Psychiat, 201 Taikang Vil, Tainan 736, Taiwan..
    Su, Jian-An
    Chiayi Chang Gung Mem Hosp, Chang Gung Med Fdn, Dept Psychiat, Chiayi, Taiwan.;Chang Gung Univ, Sch Med, Taoyuan, Taiwan.;Chang Gung Inst Technol, Dept Nursing, Taoyuan, Taiwan..
    Lin, Chung-Ying
    Natl Cheng Kung Univ, Coll Med, Inst Allied Hlth Sci, Tainan, Taiwan.;Natl Cheng Kung Univ, Coll Med, Dept Occupat Therapy, Tainan, Taiwan.;Natl Cheng Kung Univ, Coll Med, Dept Publ Hlth, Tainan, Taiwan.;Natl Cheng Kung Univ, Natl Cheng Kung Univ Hosp, Coll Med, Tainan, Taiwan.;Natl Cheng Kung Univ, Natl Cheng Kung Univ Hosp, Coll Med, Inst Allied Hlth Sci,Dept Occupat Therapy, 1 Univ Rd, Tainan 701401, Taiwan.;Natl Cheng Kung Univ, Natl Cheng Kung Univ Hosp, Coll Med, Inst Allied Hlth Sci,Dept Publ Hlth, 1 Univ Rd, Tainan 701401, Taiwan.;Natl Cheng Kung Univ, Natl Cheng Kung Univ Hosp, Coll Med, Biostat Consulting Ctr, 1 Univ Rd, Tainan 701401, Taiwan..
    Pakpour, Amir H.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dept. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, The Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare.
    Quality of life and care burden among family caregivers of people with severe mental illness: mediating effects of self-esteem and psychological distress2022In: BMC Psychiatry, E-ISSN 1471-244X, Vol. 22, no 1, article id 672Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Family caregivers are important allies for healthcare providers in facilitating the recovery process among people with mental illness (PWMI). The present study examined the factors associated with quality of life (QoL) among family caregivers of PWMI. Methods A multi-center cross-sectional survey was conducted. Family caregivers of people with schizophrenia, major depressive disorder, and bipolar disorder were recruited using convenience sampling. A survey assessing their QoL, depression, anxiety, and self-esteem was completed with self-rated psychometric scales including the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale, Caregiver Burden Inventory, Taiwanese Depression Questionnaire, Beck Anxiety Inventory, and World Health Organization Quality of Life Instrument Short Form. A mediation model was constructed with QoL as the dependent variable, care burden as the independent variable, and psychological distress (including depression and anxiety) with self-esteem as mediating variables. Results Family caregivers of people with schizophrenia had worse QoL compared with counterparts of people with major depression and bipolar disorder. The sociodemographic of both caregivers and PWMI had less impact on QoL when psychological factors were considered. Caregivers with lower self-esteem, higher levels of psychological distress, and heavier care burdens had poorer QoL. Care burden had a significant total effect on QoL. Both self-esteem and psychological distress were significant mediators. Conclusion The findings indicated that caregivers' psychological health and care burden influenced their QoL. Interventions that target family caregivers' self-esteem and psychological distress may attenuate the effect from care burden, and further improve their QoL.

  • 38.
    D’Arcy, Emily
    et al.
    Telethon Kids Institute, University of Western Australia, Perth, Western Australia, Australia; School of Allied Health, Curtin University, Bentley, Western Australia, Australia; Cooperative Research Centre for Living with Autism (Autism CRC), Long Pocket, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia; Curtin Autism Research Group, Curtin University, Perth, Western Australia, Australia.
    Girdler, Sonya
    School of Allied Health, Curtin University, Bentley, Western Australia, Australia; Cooperative Research Centre for Living with Autism (Autism CRC), Long Pocket, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia; Curtin Autism Research Group, Curtin University, Perth, Western Australia, Australia; University of Western Australia, Perth, Western Australia, Australia; Center of Neurodevelopmental Disorders (KIND), Department of Women’s and Children’s Health, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Falkmer, Marita
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD. School of Allied Health, Curtin University, Bentley, Western Australia, Australia; Cooperative Research Centre for Living with Autism (Autism CRC), Long Pocket, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia; Curtin Autism Research Group, Curtin University, Perth, Western Australia, Australia; Pain and Rehabilitation Centre, and Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Falkmer, Torbjörn
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. School of Allied Health, Curtin University, Bentley, Western Australia, Australia; c Cooperative Research Centre for Living with Autism (Autism CRC), Long Pocket, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia; Curtin Autism Research Group, Curtin University, Perth, Western Australia, Australia.
    Whitehouse, Andrew J.O.
    Telethon Kids Institute, University of Western Australia, Perth, Western Australia, Australia; Cooperative Research Centre for Living with Autism (Autism CRC), Long Pocket, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia; University of Western Australia, Perth, Western Australia, Australia.
    Wray, John
    University of Western Australia, Perth, Western Australia, Australia; State Child Development Service, Western Australia Department of Health, Perth, Western Australia, Australia.
    Eapen, Valsamma
    Cooperative Research Centre for Living with Autism (Autism CRC), Long Pocket, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia; School of Psychiatry, University of New South Wales, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia.
    Evans, Kiah
    Telethon Kids Institute, University of Western Australia, Perth, Western Australia, Australia; Cooperative Research Centre for Living with Autism (Autism CRC), Long Pocket, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia; Curtin Autism Research Group, Curtin University, Perth, Western Australia, Australia; University of Western Australia, Perth, Western Australia, Australia.
    Get it right, make it easy, see it all: Viewpoints of autistic individuals and parents of autistic individuals about the autism diagnostic process in Australia2021In: Research in Autism Spectrum Disorders, ISSN 1750-9467, E-ISSN 1878-0237, Vol. 85, article id 101792Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The clinical process for being evaluated for an autism diagnosis is often time consuming and stressful for individuals and their caregivers. While experience of and satisfaction with the diagnostic process has been reviewed in the literature, few studies have directly investigated the viewpoints of individuals diagnosed with autism and caregivers of autistic individuals about what is important in the autism diagnostic process.

    Method: A Q methodological design was employed to capture the subjective viewpoints about the diagnostic process of individuals on the autism spectrum and caregivers of autistic individuals. Thirty-eight participants responded to a set of 66 statements representing different aspects of the autism diagnostic process.

    Results: The analysis identified three significant viewpoints: Get it Right, Make it Easy, and See it All. Participants reflected upon the importance of a comprehensive diagnostic assessment process, ease of diagnostic processes, and a holistic approach to autism diagnosis for autistic individuals and caregivers of autistic individuals.

    Conclusions: The findings provide a consumer perspective that encourages reform of the current process for diagnosing autism in Australia, and an insight into what consumers are wanting from diagnostic services. This information is useful for policy-makers and service providers to create a more supportive and client-centred diagnostic process at all levels of service delivery.

  • 39.
    de Schipper, Elles
    et al.
    Center of Neurodevelopmental Disorders (KIND), Stockholm, Sweden.
    Lundequist, Aiko
    Center of Neurodevelopmental Disorders (KIND), Stockholm, Sweden.
    Wilteus, Anna Löfgren
    Center of Neurodevelopmental Disorders (KIND), Stockholm, Sweden.
    Coghill, David
    University of Dundee, UK.
    de Vries, Petrus J.
    University of Cape Town, South Africa .
    Granlund, Mats
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Holtmann, Martin
    Ruhr University Bochum, Hamm, Germany.
    Jonsson, Ulf
    Center of Neurodevelopmental Disorders (KIND), Stockholm, Sweden.
    Karande, Sunil
    Seth G.S. Medical College and K.E.M. Hospital, Mumbai, India.
    Levy, Florence
    Prince of Wales Hospital and University of New South Wales, Sydney, Australia.
    Al-Modayfer, Omar
    College of Medicine, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia.
    Rohde, Luis
    Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, Brazil.
    Tannock, Rosemary
    University of Toronto, Canada.
    Tonge, Bruce
    Monash University, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia.
    Bölte, Sven
    Center of Neurodevelopmental Disorders (KIND), Stockholm, Sweden.
    A comprehensive scoping review of ability and disability in ADHD using the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health-Children and Youth Version (ICF-CY)2015In: European Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, ISSN 1018-8827, E-ISSN 1435-165X, Vol. 24, no 8, p. 859-872Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This is the first in a series of four empirical investigations to develop International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) Core Sets for Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD). The objective here was to use a comprehensive scoping review approach to identify the concepts of functional ability and disability used in the scientific ADHD literature and link these to the nomenclature of the ICF-CY. Systematic searches were conducted using Medline/PubMed, PsycINFO, ERIC and Cinahl, to extract the relevant concepts of functional ability and disability from the identified outcome studies of ADHD. These concepts were then linked to ICF-CY by two independent researchers using a standardized linking procedure. Data from identified studies were analysed until saturation of ICF-CY categories was reached. Eighty studies were included in the final analysis. Concepts contained in these studies were linked to 128 ICF-CY categories. Of these categories, 68 were considered to be particularly relevant to ADHD (i.e., identified in at least 5 % of the studies). Of these, 32 were related to Activities and participation, 31 were related to Body functions, and five were related to environmental factors. The five most frequently identified categories were school education (53 %), energy and drive functions (50 %), psychomotor functions (50 %), attention functions (49 %), and emotional functions (45 %). The broad variety of ICF-CY categories identified in this study underlines the necessity to consider ability and disability in ADHD across all dimensions of life, for which the ICF-CY provides a valuable and universally applicable framework. These results, in combination with three additional preparatory studies (expert survey, focus groups, clinical study), will provide a scientific basis to define the ICF Core Sets for ADHD for multi-purpose use in basic and applied research, and every day clinical practice.

  • 40.
    Eklund, Sebastian
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dept. of Nursing Science.
    Saleh, Ashraf
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dept. of Nursing Science.
    Vuxnas upplevelser av att leva med ADHD: En kvalitativ litteraturöversikt2022Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) is a neuropsychiatric disorder. ADHD is a diagnosis that can affect an individual's life in multiple ways, such as physical, psychological, and social issues. ADHD is a common diagnosis which nurses will encounter in various clinical settings. Symptoms of diagnostical traits can constitute an obstacle for the individual. Lack of knowledge in healthcare personnel about the diagnosis can lead to misunderstandings and a mistrust for the healthcare in general for the individual diagnosed with ADHD. The theoretical frame of reference is the nurse’s six core competences.

    Aim: To describe the experiences of living with ADHD.

    Methods: A literature review containing twelve scientific articles with a qualitative design, published between 2012 and 2022. The articles were collected through the databases Cinahl, PsycInfo, and PubMed. The data analysis was conducted using the five steps according to Friberg (2017).

    Results: Three main categories were identified; Changes in everyday life (view of oneself and one's diagnosis, the importance of motivation), Need for support (negative consequences of ADHD, support from health care, support from relatives and the environment) and Prejudice and ignorance of one’s surroundings (significant professional life and attitudes in psychiatry). ADHD can cause both positive and negative effects on the individual. Ignorance in the society as well as ignorance among healthcare professionals can cause bad experiences of living with ADHD.

    Conclusion: There is relatively little research that examines what it is like to live with ADHD as an adult. If nurses were to increase their understanding about what it is like to live with ADHD, it can contribute to a more equal and improved care for this patient group.

    Download full text (pdf)
    Vuxnas upplevelser av att leva med ADHD
  • 41.
    Elofsson, Sara
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Quality Improvement and Leadership in Health and Welfare.
    En väg in- för barn och unga med psykisk ohälsa: en fallstudie om insatser för att förbättra tillgänglighet till utredning och behandling2020Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Child and adolescent psychiatry and the Child and Adolescent Health in the Jönköping Region lacked a systematic assessment instrument for triaging the level of care for children and adolescents with mental illness.

     

    The aim of the improvement work was to give children with mental illness access to care and treatment, at the right time and the right level of care by introducing a systematic assessment instrument, and one common unit. The purpose of the study was to clarify if the needs young people and parents expressed was handle in the new unit.

     

    The improvement work was based on Nolan’s improvement model. Interviews with patients were conducted prior to the improvement work to obtain customer views. Data for the study was collected through focus group interviews and analyzed with qualitative content analysis.

     

    A new unit launched which providing telephone counseling and assessments regarding care level by using validated assessment instruments. Families appreciate the new way of working and felt listened to. The study showed that the new unit increased collaboration between the first lines of care and specialist care and increased understanding and knowledge of activities.

     

    The introduction of a structured and systematic assessment instrument for triaging resulted in more equal and patient safe assessment, which increased quality and next step for the family.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 42.
    Ercan Doğu, Selma
    et al.
    Department of Occupational Therapy, Faculty of Hamidiye Health Sciences, University of Health Sciences, Istanbul, Turkey.
    Günal, Ayla
    Department of Physiotherapy and Rehabilitation, Faculty of Health Sciences, Tokat Gaziosmanpaşa University, Tokat, Turkey.
    Pekçetin, Serkan
    Department of Occupational Therapy, Faculty of Gulhane Health Sciences, Health Sciences University, Ankara, Turkey.
    Örsel, Sibel
    Department of Psychiatry, University of Health Sciences Diskapi Yıldırım Beyazıt Training and Research Hospital, Ankara, Turkey.
    Wagman, Petra
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Department of Rehabilitation. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT.
    Håkansson, Carita
    Department of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Validity and reliability of the Turkish Occupational Balance Questionnaire (OBQ11-T) in mental health2023In: Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy, ISSN 1103-8128, E-ISSN 1651-2014, Vol. 30, no 6, p. 796-802Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: People with psychiatric disabilities often find it difficult to maintain a satisfactory occupational balance.

    Aims/objectives: This study aimed to investigate the validity and reliability of the Turkish version of the Occupational Balance Questionnaire (OBQ11-T) in mental health.

    Material and methods: OBQ11-T was applied to 149 people for construct validity analysis and to 61 of them for reliability analysis. Validity was determined using factor analyses. The reliability of the OBQ between the first and second evaluations was assessed using the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) for each item and the total OBQ11-T score. Internal consistency was assessed using Cronbach’s alpha.

    Results: The results of factor analysis revealed one factor that explains 35.94% of the total variance in the model. OBQ11-T item 1 had the lowest and OBQ11-T item 4 had the highest factor loadings. The model fits the data according to the indices of relative fit (RMSEA = 0.087, CMIN/DF = 2.129, CFI = 0.901). There was an excellent correlation between test and retest OBQ11-T total scores (ICC = 0.905). All items of the OBQ11-T showed good reliability. Cronbach’s alpha for the OBQ11-T total score was 0.839, indicating acceptable internal consistency.

    Conclusions and significance: The current study showed that OBQ11-T is a valid and reliable tool for measuring the self-rated occupational balance of people with mental illness.

  • 43.
    Fan, Chia-Wei
    et al.
    AdventHlth Univ, Dept Occupat Therapy, Orlando, FL 32803 USA..
    Chang, Kun-Chia
    Minist Hlth & Welf, Dept Gen Psychiat, Jianan Psychiat Ctr, Tainan 71742, Taiwan..
    Lee, Kuan-Ying
    Minist Hlth & Welf, Dept Child & Adolescent Psychiat, Jianan Psychiat Ctr, Tainan 71742, Taiwan..
    Yang, Wen-Chi
    E DA Hosp, Dept Internal Med, Div Hematol & Med Oncol, Kaohsiung 82445, Taiwan.;I Shou Univ, Coll Med, Fac Sch Med, Kaohsiung 84001, Taiwan..
    Pakpour, Amir H.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dept. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, The Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare. Jonkoping Univ, Sch Hlth & Welf, Dept Nursing, SE-55111 Jonkoping, Sweden..
    Potenza, Marc N.
    Yale Sch Med, Dept Psychiat, New Haven, CT 06510 USA.;Connecticut Mental Hlth Ctr, New Haven, CT 06519 USA.;Connecticut Council Problem Gambling, Wethersfield, CT 06109 USA.;Yale Sch Med, Child Study Ctr, New Haven, CT 06510 USA.;Yale Univ, Dept Neurosci, New Haven, CT 06511 USA.;Yale Univ, Wu Tsai Inst, New Haven, CT 06510 USA..
    Lin, Chung-Ying
    Natl Cheng Kung Univ, Coll Med, Inst Allied Hlth Sci, Tainan 70101, Taiwan.;Natl Cheng Kung Univ, Natl Cheng Kung Univ Hosp, Coll Med, Biostat Consulting Ctr, Tainan 70403, Taiwan.;Natl Cheng Kung Univ, Coll Med, Dept Publ Hlth, Tainan 70101, Taiwan.;Natl Cheng Kung Univ, Coll Med, Dept Occupat Therapy, Tainan 70101, Taiwan..
    Rasch Modeling and Differential Item Functioning of the Self-Stigma Scale-Short Version among People with Three Different Psychiatric Disorders2022In: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, ISSN 1661-7827, E-ISSN 1660-4601, Vol. 19, no 14, article id 8843Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Self-stigma is prevalent in individuals with psychiatric disorders and can profoundly affect people. A unified assessment with sound psychometric properties is needed for evaluating self-stigma across psychiatric conditions. The aim of this study was to examine the psychometric properties of the Self-Stigma Scale-Short version (SSS-S) using Rasch modeling. Six-hundred and twelve participants with substance use disorders (n = 319), attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (n = 100), and schizophrenia (n = 193) completed the SSS-S. Rasch results confirmed the unidimensionality of the nine items of the SSS-S. The four-point Likert scale of the SSS-S reflected monotonical increases along the self-stigma continuum. No ceiling or floor effects were detected. Among the three subdomains of the SSS-S, cognitive items appeared to be the most robustly endorsed, and behavioral items were the least endorsed. Two items in the SSS-S displayed differential item functioning across the three diagnoses. Additionally, SSS-S scores showed weak to moderate correlation with depression, anxiety, and stress scale scores. The SSS-S had overall satisfactory psychometric properties. Healthcare professionals may use this assessment to assess self-stigma in multiple psychiatric groups, and information gained may facilitate improved care.

  • 44.
    Fröding, Elin
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, The Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare.
    Patient safety and suicide: learning in theory and practice from investigations of suicide as patient harm2022Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Suicide is a global public health challenge, around 700 000 people die from suicide every year. A large proportion was in contact with healthcare close in time before death, suggesting healthcare to be an important resource in the work with prevention of suicide.

    The overall aim of this thesis was to increase the knowledge and understanding of suicide as an incident of patient harm, and to find possibilities of changes in the approach to suicide investigations which could contribute to increased learning and improve suicide prevention in healthcare.

    Four studies were performed: in the first two studies we reviewed investigations of healthcare performed of suicide cases reported to the supervisory authority as patient harm. Study III was a scoping narrative literature review of the problems with the current approaches to investigations of suicide as patient harm and possible changes for improvement. Study IV was an interview study in which I explored the requirements for valuable investigations of suicide from the views of persons with lived experience of suicidality and professionals. All studies were performed in a Swedish context.

    The majority of suicides reported as incidents of patient harm were reported by a psychiatry healthcare provider. Most suicides occurred shortly after the last contact with healthcare and during outpatient care. Demographically, these cases were representative compared to the suicide cases in the entire population.

    As incidents of patient harm, suicides differ from most other kinds of reported patient harm in some ways. Only a small proportion occurs in hospitals, most occur in the home of the patient without any witnesses or staff around. Suicide is an act performed by the patient himself/herself and is usually the final outcome of the complex interplay of several different variables with different impacts in different contexts, varying over time and between individuals.

    It was found that the adaptation of the investigations to the requirements of the supervisory authority contributed to the fact that the learning from the healthcare’s investigations of suicide has levelled off, the same shortcomings and actions were reported over time. The investigations were performed with a strict healthcare provider perspective, with focus on the last contact with the patient, routines, and what went wrong. This resulted in suggested measures for improvement at an organizational micro level without organizational sustainability over time and with a risk to not address organizational system deficiencies.

    The investigations of suicide as potential patient harm should integrate current knowledge in suicidology and patient safety to enable learning and insights valuable for healthcare improvement. This include a holistic perspective of the patient’s situation, analysis of a longer time period and factors of importance for suicidality, suicide prevention, and patient safety, professionalization of the investigations, analyses across organizational boundaries, and focus on learning. A framework to guide this analysis is suggested in this thesis.

    The development of knowledge in the science fields of patient safety and suicidology imply the need for a cultural shift in the understanding of suicide as an incident of patient harm. Instead of making a difficult and often to some extent speculative assessment if a suicide had been prevented if other actions had been performed in the contacts with healthcare, and therefore should be investigated and reported as a severe patient harm, or not, the focus in the analyses should be on risk management over time. I propose a framework with factors of importance for a safe healthcare at suicidality to guide this analysis.

    Download full text (pdf)
    Kappa
    Download (png)
    Cover
  • 45.
    Fröding, Elin
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, The Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare.
    Mellqvist, Joanna
    Region Jönköpings län.
    Saric, Mikael
    Region Västernorrland.
    Proaktivt patientsäkerhetsarbete i den psykiatriska slutenvården [Proactive work with patient safety in psychiatry, Patient safety in Real time in Psychiatry]2022In: Läkartidningen, ISSN 0023-7205, E-ISSN 1652-7518, Vol. 119, no JulyArticle in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Traditionally, work with patient safety has mainly been focused on examining and learning from incidents retrospectively. Proactive methods to support and evaluate patient safety as work-as-done in real time are needed. Patient safety in Real time in Psychiatry (PiRiP), combining systematic reviews of inpatient records and interviews with inpatients and staff, can be such a method. We have evolved and tested this approach in psychiatric wards in Region Jönköping County and Region Västernorrland. We found that discussion and reflection with staff about the patients' views of care and treatment, observed strengths, risks and possibilities of improvement were of value to increase awareness and knowledge of how performance of daily work relates to patient safety. PiRiP adheres to the basic principles of patient safety as described in the national action plan for patient safety.

  • 46.
    Fröding, Elin
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, The Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare.
    Vincent, C
    Andersson-Gäre, Boel
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dept. for Quality Improvement and Leadership. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ARN-J (Aging Research Network - Jönköping). Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, The Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare.
    Westrin, Åsa
    Ros, Axel
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, The Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare.
    Requirements for effective investigation and learning after suicide: The views of persons with lived experience and professionalsManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 47.
    Fröding, Elin
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, The Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare. Region Jönköping County, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Vincent, C
    Department of Experimental Psychology, University of Oxford, Oxford, United Kingdom.
    Andersson-Gäre, Boel
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Department for Quality Improvement and Leadership. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ARN-J (Aging Research Network - Jönköping). Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, The Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare. Futurum, Region Jönköping County, Sweden.
    Westrin, Åsa
    Department of Clinical Sciences Lund, Psychiatry, Lund University, and Office for Psychiatry and Habilitation, Psychiatry Research Skåne, Region Skåne, Lund, Sweden.
    Ros, Axel
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, The Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare. Futurum, Region Jönköping County, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Six Major Steps to Make Investigations of Suicide Valuable for Learning and Prevention2022In: Archives of Suicide Research, ISSN 1381-1118, E-ISSN 1543-6136Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: The decline in suicide rates has leveled off in many countries during the last decade, suggesting that new interventions are needed in the work with suicide prevention. Learnings from investigations of suicide should contribute to the development of these new interventions. However, reviews of investigations have indicated that few new lessons have been learned. To be an effective tool, revisions of the current investigation methods are required. This review aimed to describe the problems with the current approaches to investigations of suicide as patient harm and to propose ways to move forward.

    METHODS: Narrative literature review.

    RESULTS: Several weaknesses in the current approaches to investigations were identified. These include failures in embracing patient and system perspectives, not addressing relevant factors, and insufficient competence of the investigation teams. Investigation methods need to encompass the progress of knowledge about suicidal behavior, suicide prevention, and patient safety.

    CONCLUSIONS: There is a need for a paradigm shift in the approaches to investigations of suicide as potential patient harm to enable learning and insights valuable for healthcare improvement. Actions to support this paradigm shift include involvement of patients and families, education for investigators, multidisciplinary analysis teams with competence in and access to relevant parts across organizations, and triage of cases for extensive analyses. A new model for the investigation of suicide that support these actions should facilitate this paradigm shift.

    HIGHLIGHTS

    • There are weaknesses in the current approaches to investigations of suicide.
    • A paradigm shift in investigations is needed to contribute to a better understanding of suicide.
    • New knowledge of suicidal behavior, prevention, and patient safety must be applied.
  • 48.
    Gerdner, Arne
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Research Platform of Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Behavioural Science and Social Work.
    Barndomens återkomst i behandling och forskning2011In: CTQ - Childhood Trauma Questionnaire, A Retrospective Self-Report: Manual, Svensk version / [ed] David P Bernstein & Laura Fink, Stockholm: Pearson Assessment and Information AB , 2011, p. 5-10Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 49.
    Gerdner, Arne
    Mittuniversitetet, Institutionen för socialt arbete.
    Diagnosinstrument för beroende och missbruk - Granskning av ADDIS validitet och interna konsistens gällande alkoholproblem2009In: Nordic Studies on Alcohol and Drugs, ISSN 1455-0725, E-ISSN 1458-6126, Vol. 26, no 3, p. 265-276Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Swedish National Board on Health and Welfare recommends that structured assessment instruments should be used in medical as well as in social treatment of substance misusers. These should be validated in a Swedish context. Instruments for diagnoses of dependence/abuse (DSM-IV) and dependence/harmful use (ICD-10) have been used in Sweden for many years, although not yet validated in Swedish. ADDIS, the Swedish version of the American SUDDS, is used in four Nordic countries and the most often used diagnostic instrument in Sweden. This article investigates the psychometric properties of ADDIS alcohol module, including discriminant and construct validity and internal consistency. The two main constructs in DSM - dependence and abuse - as well as the seven criteria for dependence and the four criteria for abuse are studied. Further, the value of each of the 44 specific items in ADDIS for capturing these criteria is studied.

    Two samples are explored: 1) a clinical sample (n = 349; incl. 129 women) and 2) a sample of 400 men convicted for driving while intoxicated. Mean age was the same (41 ys.). Using discriminant analyses on lifetime prevalence, the items correctly classify 94% of the cases in the two samples. Using one-factor principal component analysis to explore homogeneity of the combined samples, all 28 items on dependence and 15 of 18 items on abuse have loadings above 0,40 (R2 dependence = 0,46; abuse = 0,40). Separate analyses of the two samples, as well as on women, show similar results. Cronbach's alpha is excellent for dependence and satisfactory for abuse in all analyses. Analyses of specific criteria show satisfactory results on dependence and acceptable on abuse. Minor revisions are proposed to make ADDIS more user-friendly and to improve some specific items.

    In conclusion: ADDIS has acceptable to excellent discriminant and construct validity as well as internal consistency and captures the specific criteria of DSM-IV. It has the preconditions for sensitive assessment of alcohol use disorders in men and women.

    Download full text (pdf)
    Fulltext
  • 50.
    Gerdner, Arne
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Research Platform of Social Work.
    Diagnosinstrument för substansberoende - MINI, SCID-I, eller ADDIS?2015In: Best Practice, ISSN 1329-1874, Vol. 6, no 23, p. 28-31Article in journal (Other academic)
    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
1234 1 - 50 of 155
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf