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  • 1.
    Adair, Brooke
    et al.
    School of Allied Health, Australian Catholic University, Fitzroy, Vic., Australia.
    Ullenhag, Anna
    Department of Women's and Children's Health, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Keen, Deb
    Autism Centre of Excellence, Griffith University, Mt Gravatt, Qld, Australia.
    Granlund, Mats
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Behavioural Science and Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Imms, Christine
    School of Allied Health, Australian Catholic University, Fitzroy, Vic., Australia.
    The effect of interventions aimed at improving participation outcomes for children with disabilities: a systematic review2015In: Developmental Medicine & Child Neurology, ISSN 0012-1622, E-ISSN 1469-8749, Vol. 57, no 12, p. 1093-1104Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim

    Enhancement of participation has been described as the ultimate outcome for health and educational interventions. The goal of this systematic review was to identify and critically appraise studies that aimed to improve the participation outcomes of children with disabilities.

    Method

    Nine databases that index literature from the fields of health, psychology, and education were searched to retrieve information on research conducted with children with disabilities aged between 5 years and 18 years. Articles were included if the author(s) reported that participation was an intended outcome of the intervention. The articles included were limited to those reporting high-level primary research, as defined by Australia's National Health and Medical Research Council evidence hierarchy guidelines. No restrictions were placed on the type of intervention being investigated.

    Results

    Seven randomized controlled or pseudo-randomized studies were included. Only three of these studies identified participation as a primary outcome. Both individualized and group-based approaches to enhancing participation outcomes appeared to be effective. Studies of interventions with a primary focus on body function or activity level outcomes did not demonstrate an effect on participation outcomes.

    Intepretation

    Few intervention studies have focused on participation as a primary outcome measure. Approaches using individually tailored education and mentoring programmes were found to enhance participation outcomes, while exercise programmes, where participation was a secondary outcome, generally demonstrated little effect.

  • 2.
    Adair, Brooke
    et al.
    Centre for Disability and Development Research, Australian Catholic University, Fitzroy, Vic., Australia.
    Ullenhag, Anna
    Physiotherapy Department, Mälardalens University, Västerås, Sweden.
    Rosenbaum, Peter
    McMaster University, Hamilton, ON, Canada.
    Granlund, Mats
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Biomedical Platform.
    Keen, Deb
    Autism Centre of Excellence, Griffith University, Mt Gravatt, Qld, Australia.
    Imms, Christine
    Centre for Disability and Development Research, Australian Catholic University, Fitzroy, Vic., Australia.
    Measures used to quantify participation in childhood disability and their alignment with the family of participation-related constructs: a systematic review2018In: Developmental Medicine & Child Neurology, ISSN 0012-1622, E-ISSN 1469-8749, Vol. 60, no 11, p. 1101-1116Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIM:

    We aimed to identify measures used to assess the participation of disabled children and to map the measures' content to the family of participation-related constructs (fPRC) to inform future research and practice.

    METHOD:

    Six databases were searched to identify measures used to assess participation in health, psychology, and education research. Included studies involved children aged 0 to 18 years with a permanent impairment or developmental disability and reported use of a quantitative measure of participation. A second search sought relevant literature about each identified measure (including published manuals) to allow a comprehensive understanding of the measure. Measurement constructs of frequently reported measures were then mapped to the fPRC.

    RESULTS:

    From an initial yield of 32 767 articles, 578 reported one or more of 118 participation measures. Of these, 51 measures were reported in more than one article (our criterion) and were therefore eligible for mapping to the fPRC. Twenty-one measures quantified aspects of participation attendance, 10 quantified aspects of involvement as discrete scales, and four quantified attendance and involvement in a manner that could not be separated.

    INTERPRETATION:

    Improved understanding of participation and its related constructs is developing rapidly; thoughtful selection of measures in research is critical to further our knowledge base.

    WHAT THIS PAPER ADDS:

    The fPRC can support our rapidly evolving and expanding understanding of participation. Instruments selected to measure participation do not always align with emerging concepts. Matching research aims to a chosen measure's content will improve understanding of participation. Opportunities exist to develop validated participation measures, especially self-reported measures of involvement.

  • 3.
    Algurén, Beatrix
    et al.
    Institute for Health and Rehabilitation Sciences (IHRS), Unit for Biopsychosocial Health, Ludwig-Maximilians-University, Munich, Germany.
    Lundgren Nilsson, Åsa
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science.
    Sunnerhagen, Katharina S.
    Functioning of patients with first-ever stroke six weeks after admission – a report from Sweden applying the International Classification of Functioning (ICF)2007Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 4.
    Alimoradi, Zainab
    et al.
    Social Determinants of Health Research Center, Qazvin University of Medical Sciences, Qazvin, Iran.
    Lin, Chung-Ying
    Department of Rehabilitation Sciences, Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hung Hom, Hong Kong.
    Broström, Anders
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT. Department of Clinical Neurophysiology, Linköping University Hospital, Linköping, Sweden.
    Bülow, Pia H.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. SALVE (Social challenges, Actors, Living conditions, reseach VEnue). Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT.
    Bajalan, Zahra
    Social Determinants of Health Research Center, Qazvin University of Medical Sciences, Qazvin, Iran.
    Griffiths, Mark D.
    International Gaming Research Unit, Psychology Department, Nottingham Trent University, Nottingham, United Kingdom.
    Ohayon, Maurice M.
    Stanford Sleep Epidemiology Research Center (SSERC), School of Medicine, Stanford University, CA, United States.
    Pakpour, Amir H.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Department of Clinical Neurophysiology, Linköping University Hospital, Linköping, Sweden.
    Internet addiction and sleep problems: A systematic review and meta-analysis2019In: Sleep Medicine Reviews, ISSN 1087-0792, E-ISSN 1532-2955, Vol. 47, p. 51-61Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The pathological use of the internet – conceptualized as ‘internet addiction’ – might be crucial in initiating and increasing sleep disturbances in the community. While inconsistent evidence is reported regarding the association of internet addiction and sleep disturbances, the severity of this association remains unclear. This systematic review and meta-analysis were conducted to increase our understanding of the relationship between internet addiction and sleep disturbances. A systematic review was conducted through Scopus, PubMed Central, ProQuest, ISI Web of Knowledge, and EMBASE using keywords related to internet addiction and sleep problems. Observational studies (cohort, case-control or cross-sectional studies) focusing on association between internet addiction and sleep disturbances including sleep problems and sleep duration were selected. A meta-analysis using random-effect model was conducted to calculate the odds ratio (OR) for experiencing sleep problems and standardized mean differences (SMDs) for sleep duration. Eligible studies (N = 23) included 35,684 participants. The overall pooled OR of having sleep problems if addicted to the internet was 2.20 (95% CI: 1.77–2.74). Additionally, the overall pooled SMDs for sleep duration for the IA group compared to normal internet users was −0.24 (95% CI: −0.38, −0.10). Results of the meta-analysis revealed a significant OR for sleep problems and a significant reduced sleep duration among individuals addicted to the internet.

    The full text will be freely available from 2020-07-04 00:00
  • 5.
    Almberg, Maria
    et al.
    Mobility Centre Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Selander, Helena
    Mobility Centre Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Falkmer, Marita
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD. School of Occupational Therapy and Social Work, Faculty of Health Sciences, Curtin University, Perth, Australia.
    Vaz, Sharmila
    School of Occupational Therapy and Social Work, Faculty of Health Sciences, Curtin University, Perth, Australia.
    Ciccarelli, Marina
    School of Occupational Therapy and Social Work, Faculty of Health Sciences, Curtin University, Perth, Australia.
    Falkmer, Torbjörn
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. School of Occupational Therapy and Social Work, Faculty of Health Sciences, Curtin University, Perth, Australia.
    Experiences of facilitators or barriers in driving education from learner and novice drivers with ADHD or ASD and their driving instructors2017In: Developmental Neurorehabilitation, ISSN 1751-8423, E-ISSN 1751-8431, Vol. 20, no 2, p. 59-67Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Little is known about whether individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) or attention deficit hyperactive disorder (ADHD) experience any specific facilitators or barriers to driving education.

    Objective: To explore the facilitators or barriers to driving education experienced by individuals with ASD or ADHD who obtained a learner’s permit, from the perspective of the learner drivers and their driving instructors.

    Methods: Data were collected from 33 participants with ASD or ADHD, and nine of their driving instructors.

    Results: Participants with ASD required twice as many driving lessons and more on-road tests than those with ADHD. Participants with ADHD repeated the written tests more than those with ASD. Driving license theory was more challenging for individuals with ADHD, whilst individuals with ASD found translating theory into practice and adjusting to “unfamiliar” driving situations to be the greatest challenges.

    Conclusion: Obtaining a driving license was associated with stressful training experience.

  • 6.
    Ardila-Ardila, A.
    et al.
    University of Miami/Jackson Memorial Medical Center.
    Goodkin, K.
    University of Miami/Jackson Memorial Medical Center.
    Concha-Bartolini, M.
    University of Miami/Jackson Memorial Medical Center.
    Lecusay-Ruiz, Robert
    University of Miami/Jackson Memorial Medical Center.
    O'Mellan-Fajardo, S.
    University of Miami/Jackson Memorial Medical Center.
    Suarez-Bustamante, P.
    University of Miami/Jackson Memorial Medical Center.
    Molina-Vasquez, R.
    University of Miami/Jackson Memorial Medical Center.
    Lee, D.
    University of Miami/Jackson Memorial Medical Center.
    Chayeb, G.
    University of Miami/Jackson Memorial Medical Center.
    Wilkie, F. L.
    University of Miami/Jackson Memorial Medical Center.
    HUMANS: una batería neuropsicologica para la evaluación de pacientes infectados con VIH-1: [Humans: a neuropsychological battery for evaluating HIV-1 infected patients]2003In: Revista de neurología (Ed. impresa), ISSN 0210-0010, E-ISSN 1576-6578, Vol. 36, no 8, p. 756-762Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective. To develop a neuropsychological test battery in Spanish for the cognitive evaluation of HIV-1 infected patients. Development. Departing from the suggestions presented by the work group of the National Institute of Mental Health (USA), a neuropsychological assessment battery was developed. It was named HUMANS (HIV/University of Miami Annotated Neuropsychological test battery in Spanish). This battery includes the following domains: 1) attention and speed of processing information, 2) memory, 3) executive function, 4) language, 5) visuospacial/visuoconstructive abilities, and 6) motor abilities. Administration takes about 3-4 hours. The English parallel version of this battery has been successfully used in English for over a decade with HIV-1 infected patients. In the paper the development and adaptation to Spanish language of the HUMANS neuropsychology section is presented Conclusions. HUMANS neuropsychological test battery fulfill the recommendations presented by the workgroup of the National Institute of Mental Health for evaluating HIV-1 infected patients. Studies regarding validity and reliability are still required.

  • 7. Artzi, M.
    et al.
    Shiran, S. I.
    Weinstein, M.
    Myers, V.
    Tarrasch, R.
    Schertz, M.
    Fattal-Valevski, A.
    Miller, E.
    Gordon, A. M.
    Green, Dido
    Department Occupational Therapy, Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv, Israel.
    Ben Bashat, D.
    Cortical reorganization following injury early in life2016In: Neural Plasticity, ISSN 2090-5904, E-ISSN 1687-5443, article id 8615872Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The brain has a remarkable capacity for reorganization following injury, especially during the first years of life. Knowledge of structural reorganization and its consequences following perinatal injury is sparse. Here we studied changes in brain tissue volume, morphology, perfusion, and integrity in children with hemiplegia compared to typically developing children, using MRI. Children with hemiplegia demonstrated reduced total cerebral volume, with increased cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and reduced total white matter volumes, with no differences in total gray matter volume, compared to typically developing children. An increase in cortical thickness at the hemisphere contralateral to the lesion (CLH) was detected in motor and language areas, which may reflect compensation for the gray matter loss in the lesion area or retention of ipsilateral pathways. In addition, reduced cortical thickness, perfusion, and surface area were detected in limbic areas. Increased CSF volume and precentral cortical thickness and reduced white matter volume were correlated with worse motor performance. Brain reorganization of the gray matter within the CLH, while not necessarily indicating better outcome, is suggested as a response to neuronal deficits following injury early in life.

  • 8.
    Arvidsson, Patrik
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Centre for Research and Development, Uppsala University/Region Gävleborg, Gävle, Sweden.
    Dada, Shakila
    Centre for Augmentative and Alternative Communication, University of Pretoria, Pretoria, South Africa.
    Granlund, Mats
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. SALVE (Social challenges, Actors, Living conditions, reseach VEnue).
    Imms, Christine
    Centre for Disability and Development Research, Australian Catholic University, Melbourne, Australia.
    Bornman, Juan
    Centre for Augmentative and Alternative Communication, University of Pretoria, Pretoria, South Africa.
    Elliott, Catherine
    School of Occupational Therapy, Speech pathology and Social Work, Curtin University, Perth, Australia.
    Huus, Karina
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Content validity and usefulness of Picture My Participation for measuring participation in children with and without intellectual disability in South Africa and Sweden2019In: Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy, ISSN 1103-8128, E-ISSN 1651-2014Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Participation comprises attendance and involvement in everyday situations. Picture My Participation (PmP) is an instrument intended to measure participation in children with disabilities, particularly in low and middle income countries.

    Aim: To investigate content validity and usefulness of PmP for measuring participation in children with intellectual disability (ID) in South Africa and Sweden.

    Methods: A picture supported interview with 149 children, 6?18 years, with and without ID. Twenty everyday activities were provided. The three most important activities were selected by the child. Attendance was rated on all activities. Involvement was rated on the most important.

    Results: All activities were selected as important by at least one child with ID in both countries. There were similarities in perceived importance between the children with and without ID from South Africa. The children from South Africa with ID were the only subgroup that used all scale points for rating attendance and involvement.

    Conclusion: The 20 selected activities of PmP were especially relevant for children with ID in South Africa. The usefulness of the scales was higher for the children with ID in both countries. PmP is promising for assessing participation across different settings but psychometrical properties and clinical utility need further exploration.

  • 9. Barnett, A.
    et al.
    Green, Dido
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Blank, R.
    New international clinical recommendations on Developmental Coordination Disorders (DCD): focus on adolescents and adults2018Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 10.
    Bergendal, Birgitta
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare. National Oral Disability Centre for Rare Disorders, The Institute for Postgraduate Dental Education, Jönköping, Sweden.
    McAllister, Anita
    CLINTEC, Division of Speech and Language Pathology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Orofacial function and monitoring of oral care in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis2017In: Acta Odontologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-6357, E-ISSN 1502-3850, Vol. 75, no 3, p. 179-185Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: The aim was to assess orofacial function and monitor oral care in patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) to maintain oral comfort and oral health.

    MATERIALS AND METHODS: A case series of 14 patients newly diagnosed with ALS accepted to participate in a quality improvement project. After initial examinations, baseline oral conditions were obtained and the patients were seen every 3 months. Nordic Orofacial Test-Screening (NOT-S) was used for evaluation of orofacial function.

    RESULTS: Patients were grouped according to initial symptoms in a bulbar group and a spinal group with eight and six patients, respectively. The mean age at diagnosis was 62.8 years. All were dentate with a mean of 26.7 natural teeth. Most patients had very good oral and dental conditions. As expected, orofacial functions were differently affected in the two groups; at initial NOT-S registration, the mean total score was 5.6 (range 3-8 domains) in the bulbar group and 0.7 (0-2 domains) in the spinal group. At final registration, the corresponding figures were 6.1 and 3.2. Oral and dental aids were introduced according to need.

    CONCLUSIONS: In the bulbar group, several orofacial functions became impaired at an early stage of disease development, and at final registrations many vital orofacial functions were severely compromised. The spinal group was less severely affected orally. However, all individuals irrespective of type of initial symptoms needed assistance in performing oral hygiene measures in the latter part of the disease period. Good oral health and oral comfort could be maintained in all participants and no other dental treatment was needed.

  • 11. Besga, Ariadna
    et al.
    Cedazo-Minguez, Angel
    Kåreholt, Ingemar
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology.
    Solomon, Alina
    Björkhem, Ingemar
    Winblad, Bengt
    Leoni, Valerio
    Hooshmand, Babak
    Spulber, Gabriela
    Gonzalez-Pinto, Ana
    Kivipelto, Miia
    Wahlund, Lars-Olof
    Differences in brain cholesterol metabolism and insulin in two subgroups of patients with different CSF biomarkers but similar white matter lesions suggest different pathogenic mechanisms2012In: Neuroscience Letters, ISSN 0304-3940, E-ISSN 1872-7972, Vol. 510, no 2, p. 121-126Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Investigate possible associations of white matter hyperintensities (WMHs) with the metabolism of cholesterol and insulin in two subgroups of patients with memory complaints and different CSF Aβ42 and CSF tau levels. 59 patients from the memory clinic at Karolinska Hospital were included. Degree of WMHs was rated using the ARWMC scale and the following biomarkers were measured in CSF and plasma: insulin, cholesterol, lanosterol, lathosterol, and oxidized cholesterol metabolites. The WMHs in CSF control-like group correlated with increased brain cholesterol synthesis and reduced efflux of oxysterols and insulin in CSF. In the CSF AD-like group, the WMHs correlated with increased peripheral cholesterol metabolism. Despite having similar appearance on FLAIR images, the pathogenic mechanisms of WMHS are likely to be different in the two groups investigated.

  • 12.
    Blane, Alison
    et al.
    School of Occupational Therapy and Social Work, Curtin University, Perth, Australia.
    Falkmer, Torbjörn
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. School of Occupational Therapy and Social Work, Curtin University, Perth, Australia.
    Lee, Hoe C.
    School of Occupational Therapy and Social Work, Curtin University, Perth, Australia.
    Willstrand, Tania D.
    Human Factors, Swedish National Road and Transport Research Institute (VTI), Göteborg, Sweden.
    Investigating cognitive ability and self-reported driving performance of post-stroke adults in a driving simulator2018In: Topics in Stroke Rehabilitation, ISSN 1074-9357, E-ISSN 1945-5119, Vol. 25, no 1, p. 44-53Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Safe driving is a complex activity that requires calibration. This means the driver can accurately assess the level of task demand required for task completion and can accurately evaluate their driving capability. There is much debate on the calibration ability of post-stroke drivers.

    Objectives

    The aim of this study was to assess the cognition, self-rated performance, and estimation of task demand in a driving simulator with post-stroke drivers and controls.

    Methods

    A between-groups study design was employed, which included a post-stroke driver group and a group of similarly aged older control drivers. Both groups were observed driving in two simulator-based driving scenarios and asked to complete the NASA Task Load Index (TLX) to assess their perceived task demand and self-rate their driving performance. Participants also completed a battery of psychometric tasks to assess attention and executive function, which was used to determine whether post-stroke cognitive impairment impacted on calibration.

    Results

    There was no difference in the amount of perceived task demand required to complete the driving task. Despite impairments in cognition, the post-stroke drivers were not more likely to over-estimate their driving abilities than controls. On average, the post-stroke drivers self-rated themselves more poorly than the controls and this rating was related to cognitive ability.

    Conclusion

    This study suggests that post-stroke drivers may be aware of their deficits and adjust their driving behavior. Furthermore, using self-performance measures alongside a driving simulator and cognitive assessments may provide complementary fitness-to-drive assessments, as well as rehabilitation tools during post-stroke recovery.

  • 13.
    Blane, Alison
    et al.
    School of Occupational Therapy and Social Work, Curtin University, Perth, Western Australia, Australia.
    Lee, Hoe
    School of Occupational Therapy and Social Work, Curtin University, Perth, Western Australia, Australia.
    Falkmer, Torbjörn
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. School of Occupational Therapy and Social Work, Curtin University, Perth, Western Australia, Australia.
    Dukic Willstrand, Tania
    Swedish National Road and Transport Research Institute (VTI), Human Factors, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Cognitive ability as a predictor of task demand and self-rated driving performance in post-stroke drivers – Implications for self-regulation2018In: Journal of Transport and Health, ISSN 2214-1405, E-ISSN 2214-1405, Vol. 9, p. 169-179Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Driving is a highly complex task requiring multiple cognitive processes that can be adversely affected post-stroke. It is unclear how much ability post-stroke adults have to self-evaluate their driving performance. Furthermore, the impact of cognitive decline on this evaluation has not been previously investigated. The aim of this study was to investigate the perceived level of task demand involved in driving tasks, and to examine differences between perceived and observed driving performance in post-stroke drivers in comparison to a control group. A further aim of the research was to investigate the influence of cognition on self-rated driving performance. A total of 78 participants (35 post-stroke and 43 controls) were assessed using a series of cognitive tasks and were observed whilst driving. Participants were asked to rate their own driving performance and the task demand involved while driving using the NASA Task Load Index. Between group analyses were conducted to determine differences in the level of self-rated performance and task demand. Further analyses were conducted to investigate whether cognition accounted for differences in task demand or self-rated performance. Overall, the results suggested that the post-stroke drivers exhibited deficits in cognition, but they did not report increased levels of task demand when driving. Post-stroke adults also rated themselves more conservatively than the controls for on-road performance, which was associated with their reduced propensity for risk. The study suggests that cognitive deficits may influence post-stroke drivers to amend their driving behaviour, in order to bring the task demand within a manageable level. Understanding the mechanisms involved in self-rated performance and estimations of task demand can help promote accurate self-regulation practices in post-stroke drivers. Furthermore, measuring calibration may assist practitioners with assessing fitness-to-drive, as well as with tailoring driving rehabilitation.

  • 14.
    Blank, Rainer
    et al.
    Clinic for Child Neurology and Social Pediatrics, Child Centre Maulbronn, Maulbronn, Germany.
    Barnett, Anna L.
    Department of Psychology, Health & Professional Development, Oxford Brookes University, Oxford, United Kingdom.
    Cairney, John
    Faculty of Kinesiology and Physical Education, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada.
    Green, Dido
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Kirby, Amanda
    Dyscovery Centre, University of South Wales, Newport, United Kingdom.
    Polatajko, Helene
    Department of Occupational Science and Occupational Therapy, Rehabilitation Sciences Institute, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada.
    Rosenblum, Sara
    Laboratory of Complex Human Activity and Participation, Department of Occupational Therapy, University of Haifa, Haifa, Israel.
    Smits-Engelsman, Bouwien
    Department of Health and Rehabilitation Services, University of Cape Town, Cape Town, South Africa.
    Sugden, David
    School of Special Needs Education, University of Leeds, Leeds, United Kingdom.
    Wilson, Peter
    School of Psychology and Centre for Disability and Development Research, Australian Catholic University, Melbourne, VIC, Australia.
    Vinçon, Sabine
    Clinic for Child Neurology and Social Pediatrics, Child Centre Maulbronn, Maulbronn, Germany.
    International clinical practice recommendations on the definition, diagnosis, assessment, intervention, and psychosocial aspects of developmental coordination disorder2019In: Developmental Medicine & Child Neurology, ISSN 0012-1622, E-ISSN 1469-8749, Vol. 61, no 3, p. 242-285Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIM: These international clinical practice recommendations (CPR) for developmental coordination disorder (DCD), initiated by the European Academy of Childhood Disability (EACD), aim to address key questions on the definition, diagnosis, assessment, intervention, and psychosocial aspects of DCD relevant for clinical practice.

    METHOD: Key questions in five areas were considered through literature reviews and formal expert consensus. For recommendations based on evidence, literature searches on 'mechanisms', 'assessment', and 'intervention' were updated since the last recommendations in 2012. New searches were conducted for 'psychosocial issues' and 'adolescents/adults'. Evidence was rated according to the Oxford Centre for Evidence-Based Medicine (level of evidence [LOE] 1-4) and transferred into recommendations. For recommendations based on formal consensus, two meetings of an international, multidisciplinary expert panel were conducted with a further five Delphi rounds to develop good clinical practice (GCP) recommendations.

    RESULTS: Thirty-five recommendations were made. Eight were based on the evidence from literature reviews (three on 'assessment', five on 'intervention'). Twenty-two were updated from the 2012 recommendations. New recommendations relate to diagnosis and assessment (two GCPs) and psychosocial issues (three GCPs). Additionally, one new recommendation (LOE) reflects active video games as adjuncts to more traditional activity-oriented and participation-oriented interventions, and two new recommendations (one GCP, one LOE) were made for adolescents and adults with DCD.

    INTERPRETATION: The CPR-DCD is a comprehensive overview of DCD and current understanding based on research evidence and expert consensus. It reflects the state of the art for clinicians and scientists of varied disciplines. The international CPR-DCD may serve as a basis for national guidelines.

    WHAT THIS PAPER ADDS:

    • Updated international clinical practice guidelines on developmental coordination disorder (DCD).
    • Refined and extended recommendations on clinical assessment and intervention for DCD.
    • A critical synopsis of current research on mechanisms of DCD.
    • A critical synopsis of psychosocial issues in DCD, with implications for clinical practice.
    • The first international recommendations to consider adolescents and adults with DCD.
  • 15.
    Bokenberger, K.
    et al.
    Karolinska Institutet, Department of Medical Epidemiology & Biostatistics, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Sjölander, A.
    Karolinska Institutet, Department of Medical Epidemiology & Biostatistics, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Dahl Aslan, Anna K.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ARN-J (Aging Research Network - Jönköping). Karolinska Institutet, Department of Medical Epidemiology & Biostatistics, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Karlsson, Ida K.
    Karolinska Institutet, Department of Medical Epidemiology & Biostatistics, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Akerstedt, T.
    Stockholm University, Stress Research Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Pedersen, N. L.
    Karolinska Institutet, Department of Medical Epidemiology & Biostatistics, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Midlife shift work and risk of incident dementia2017In: Sleep, ISSN 0161-8105, E-ISSN 1550-9109, Vol. 40, p. A425-A425Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 16.
    Bokenberger, Kathleen
    et al.
    Karolinska Institutet, Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Sjölander, Arvid
    Karolinska Institutet, Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Dahl Aslan, Anna K.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ARN-J (Aging Research Network - Jönköping). Karolinska Institutet, Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Karlsson, Ida K.
    Karolinska Institutet, Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Åkerstedt, Torbjörn
    Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Pedersen, Nancy Lee
    Department of Psychology, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, United States.
    Shift work and risk of incident dementia: a study of two population-based cohorts2018In: European Journal of Epidemiology, ISSN 0393-2990, E-ISSN 1573-7284, Vol. 33, no 10, p. 977-987Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study aimed to investigate the association between shift work and incident dementia in two population-based cohorts from the Swedish Twin Registry (STR). The STR-1973 sample included 13,283 participants born 1926–1943 who received a mailed questionnaire in 1973 that asked about status (ever/never) and duration (years) of shift work employment. The Screening Across the Lifespan Twin (SALT) sample included 41,199 participants born 1900–1958 who participated in a telephone interview in 1998–2002 that asked about night work status and duration. Dementia diagnoses came from Swedish patient registers. Cox proportional-hazards regression was used to estimate hazard ratios (HR) with 95% confidence intervals (CI). Potential confounders such as age, sex, education, diabetes, cardiovascular disease and stroke were included in adjusted models. In genotyped subsamples (n = 2977 in STR-1973; n = 10,366 in SALT), APOE ε4 status was considered in models. A total of 983 (7.4%) and 1979 (4.8%) dementia cases were identified after a median of 41.2 and 14.1 years follow-up in the STR-1973 and SALT sample, respectively. Ever shift work (HR 1.36, 95% CI 1.15–1.60) and night work (HR 1.12, 95% CI 1.01–1.23) were associated with higher dementia incidence. Modest dose-response associations were observed, where longer duration shift work and night work predicted increased dementia risk. Among APOE ε4 carriers, individuals exposed to ≥ 20 years of shift work and night work had increased dementia risk compared to day workers. Findings indicate that shift work, including night shift work, compared to non-shift jobs is associated with increased dementia incidence. Confirmation of findings is needed. 

  • 17. Bonthrone, A. F.
    et al.
    Morgan, A. T.
    Mankad, K.
    Clark, C. A.
    Green, Dido
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Liegeois, F. J.
    Brain imaging correlates of limb and speech motor difficulties in children aged 8-10 with Developmental Coordination Disorder2018Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 18.
    Broström, Anders
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT. Department of Clinical Neurophysiology, Linköping University Hospital, Linköping, Sweden.
    Pakpour, Amir H.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Social Determinants of Health Research Center, Qazvin University of Medical Sciences, Qazvin, Iran.
    Nilsen, P.
    Department of Health and Society, Division of Social Medicine and Public Health Science, Faculty of Health Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Fridlund, Bengt
    CICE, Linneus University, Växjö, Sweden.
    Ulander, M.
    Department of Clinical Neurophysiology, Linköping University Hospital, Linköping, Sweden.
    Psychometric properties of the Ethos Brief Index (EBI) using factorial structure and Rasch Analysis among patients with obstructive sleep apnea before and after CPAP treatment is initiated2018In: Sleep and Breathing, ISSN 1520-9512, E-ISSN 1522-1709Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Continuous positive airway treatment (CPAP) is the recommended treatment for patients with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). Outcome measures often focus on clinical and/or self-rated variables related to the medical condition. However, a brief validated instrument focusing on the whole life situation (i.e., ethos) suitable for clinical practice is missing. The aim of this study was to investigate factorial structure, categorical functioning of the response scale, and differential item functioning across sub-populations of the Ethos Brief Index (EBI) among patients with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) before and after initiation of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP).

    Methods: A prospective design, including 193 patients with OSA (68% men, 59.66 years, SD 11.51) from two CPAP clinics, was used. Clinical assessment and overnight respiratory polygraphy were used to diagnose patients. Questionnaires administered before and after 6 months of CPAP treatment included EBI, Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS), Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, and global perceived health (initial item in SF-36). The validity and reliability of the EBI were investigated using Rasch and confirmatory factor analysis models. Measurement invariance, unidimensionality, and differential item functioning across gender groups, Apnea-Hypopnea Index, and ESS groups were assessed.

    Results: The reliability of the EBI was confirmed using composite reliability and Cronbach’s alpha. The results supported unidimensionality of the EBI in confirmatory factor analysis and the Rasch model. No differential item functioning was found. A latent profile analysis yielded two profiles of patients with low (n = 42) and high (n = 151) ethos. Patients in the low ethos group were younger and had higher depression scores, lower perceived health, and higher body mass index.

    Conclusions: The EBI is a valid tool with robust psychometric properties suitable for use among patients with OSA before and after treatment with CPAP is initiated. Future studies should focus on its predictive validity. 

  • 19.
    Broström, Anders
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT.
    Pakpour, Amir H.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Social Determinants of Health Research Center, Qazvin University of Medical Sciences, Qazvin, Iran.
    Nilsen, Per
    Department of Health and Society, Division of Social Medicine and Public Health Science, Faculty of Health Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Hedberg, Berith
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, The Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. IMPROVE (Improvement, innovation, and leadership in health and welfare).
    Ulander, Martin
    Department of Clinical Neurophysiology, Linköping University Hospital, Linköping, Sweden.
    Validation of CollaboRATE and SURE - two short questionnaires to measure shared decision making during CPAP initiation2018In: Journal of Sleep Research, ISSN 0962-1105, E-ISSN 1365-2869, article id e12808Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Adherence to continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) treatment tends to be low. Brief validated instruments focusing on shared decision making have not been used in a CPAP context. The aim was to investigate factorial structure, categorical functioning of the response scale and differential item functioning across sub-populations of the CollaboRATE and Sure questionnaires among patients with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) before CPAP treatment is initiated. A prospective design, including 193 objectively diagnosed (polygraphy) OSA patients (68% men, 59.7 years, SD 11.5) from two CPAP clinics was used. Data were collected with the following questionnaires; Sure, CollaboRATE, Attitudes to CPAP Inventory, Epworth sleepiness scale, minimal insomnia symptoms scale, and hospital anxiety and depression scale. Objective CPAP use was collected after 6 months; 49% demonstrated decisional conflict on SURE and 51% scored low levels of shared decision making on CollaboRATE. Unidimensionality was found for both CollaboRATE (one factor explaining 57.4%) and SURE (one factor explaining 53.7%), as well as local independence. Differential item functioning showed both to be invariant across both male and female patients. Internal consistency (Cronbach's alpha 0.83) and composite reliability (0.89) were good. Latent class analyses showed that patients with low decisional conflict and high shared decision making were more adherent to CPAP treatment. CollaboRATE and SURE provided good validity and reliability scores to measure shared decision making and decisional conflict in relation to CPAP treatment. The questionnaires can be used by healthcare personnel as a tool to simplify the assessment of shared decision making.

  • 20. Bundy, A.
    et al.
    Green, Dido
    Group Approaches in Childhood2017In: Cognitive Orientation to Daily Occupational Performance in Occupational Therapy: Using the CO-OP Approach (TM) to Enable Participation Across the Lifespan / [ed] D. Dawson, S. Mcewen, & H. Polatajko, American Occupational Therapy , 2017Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 21. Bundy, Anita C.
    et al.
    Green, Dido
    Viewing children through multiple lenses2015In: Sensory integration: Theory and practice / [ed] A. C. Bundy & S. J. Lane, Philadelphia: F. A. Davis , 2015, 3Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 22.
    Carlberg, Louise
    et al.
    Hälsa och Habilitering, Region Uppsala, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Granlund, Mats
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Achievement and participation in schools for young adolescents with self-reported neuropsychiatric disabilities: A cross-sectional study from the Southern part of Sweden2019In: Scandinavian Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1403-4948, E-ISSN 1651-1905, Vol. 47, no 2, p. 199-206Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Schools are expected to be an environment where children can reach their fullest potential and develop their talents, personality, as well as their mental and physical abilities. Children with disabilities often have restricted participation and lower achievement in school. The aim is to investigate if there are any differences in participation and achievement in school between adolescents, with and without self-reported neuropsychiatric disabilities, and to explore the relations between achievement and participation. 

    Methods: A cross-sectional study was carried out based on data collected from 1520 adolescents in the sixth and seventh grade, from the south of Sweden. Multiple logistic regression was conducted to explore the relationship between having a neuropsychiatric disability, with participation and achievement, and how different factors affected this relationship. 

    Results: Having a self-reported neuropsychiatric disability increases the likelihood of having restricted participation (adjusted odds ratio (AOR): 2.89; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.99–4.23) and lower achievement in school (AOR: 2.94; 95% CI: 2.06–4.24). These adolescents were also more likely to have negative relationships to their teachers, be bullied, have poorer connectedness to their parents, come from families with less money, be trying drugs and be male, in comparison to the adolescents without a neuropsychiatric disability. The odds of having lower achievement increased with lower engagement and absenteeism from class. 

    Conclusions: Adolescents with self-reported neuropsychiatric disabilities have a disadvantaged situation in school, and are exposed to factors that could have long-term negative effects. More longitudinal research is required to conclude what factors are causing restricted participation and low achievement.

  • 23. Davies, G.
    et al.
    Lam, M.
    Harris, S. E.
    Trampush, J. W.
    Luciano, M.
    Hill, W. D.
    Hagenaars, S. P.
    Ritchie, S. J.
    Marioni, R. E.
    Fawns-Ritchie, C.
    Liewald, D. C. M.
    Okely, J. A.
    Ahola-Olli, A. V.
    Barnes, C. L. K.
    Bertram, L.
    Bis, J. C.
    Burdick, K. E.
    Christoforou, A.
    Derosse, P.
    Djurovic, S.
    Espeseth, T.
    Giakoumaki, S.
    Giddaluru, S.
    Gustavson, D. E.
    Hayward, C.
    Hofer, E.
    Ikram, M. A.
    Karlsson, R.
    Knowles, E.
    Lahti, J.
    Leber, M.
    Li, S.
    Mather, K. A.
    Melle, I.
    Morris, D.
    Oldmeadow, C.
    Palviainen, T.
    Payton, A.
    Pazoki, R.
    Petrovic, K.
    Reynolds, C. A.
    Sargurupremraj, M.
    Scholz, M.
    Smith, J. A.
    Smith, A. V.
    Terzikhan, N.
    Thalamuthu, A.
    Trompet, S.
    Van Der Lee, S. J.
    Ware, E. B.
    Windham, B. G.
    Wright, M. J.
    Yang, J.
    Yu, J.
    Ames, D.
    Amin, N.
    Amouyel, P.
    Andreassen, O. A.
    Armstrong, N. J.
    Assareh, A. A.
    Attia, J. R.
    Attix, D.
    Avramopoulos, D.
    Bennett, D. A.
    Böhmer, A. C.
    Boyle, P. A.
    Brodaty, H.
    Campbell, H.
    Cannon, T. D.
    Cirulli, E. T.
    Congdon, E.
    Conley, E. D.
    Corley, J.
    Cox, S. R.
    Dale, A. M.
    Dehghan, A.
    Dick, D.
    Dickinson, D.
    Eriksson, J. G.
    Evangelou, E.
    Faul, J. D.
    Ford, I.
    Freimer, N. A.
    Gao, H.
    Giegling, I.
    Gillespie, N. A.
    Gordon, S. D.
    Gottesman, R. F.
    Griswold, M. E.
    Gudnason, V.
    Harris, T. B.
    Hartmann, A. M.
    Hatzimanolis, A.
    Heiss, G.
    Holliday, E. G.
    Joshi, P. K.
    Kähönen, M.
    Kardia, S. L. R.
    Karlsson, Ida K.
    Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Kleineidam, L.
    Knopman, D. S.
    Kochan, N. A.
    Konte, B.
    Kwok, J. B.
    Le Hellard, S.
    Lee, T.
    Lehtimäki, T.
    Li, S. -C
    Liu, T.
    Koini, M.
    London, E.
    Longstreth, W.T., Jr.
    Lopez, O. L.
    Loukola, A.
    Luck, T.
    Lundervold, A. J.
    Lundquist, A.
    Lyytikäinen, L. -P
    Martin, N. G.
    Montgomery, G. W.
    Murray, A. D.
    Need, A. C.
    Noordam, R.
    Nyberg, L.
    Ollier, W.
    Papenberg, G.
    Pattie, A.
    Polasek, O.
    Poldrack, R. A.
    Psaty, B. M.
    Reppermund, S.
    Riedel-Heller, S. G.
    Rose, R. J.
    Rotter, J. I.
    Roussos, P.
    Rovio, S. P.
    Saba, Y.
    Sabb, F. W.
    Sachdev, P. S.
    Satizabal, C. L.
    Schmid, M.
    Scott, R. J.
    Scult, M. A.
    Simino, J.
    Slagboom, P. E.
    Smyrnis, N.
    Soumaré, A.
    Stefanis, N. C.
    Stott, D. J.
    Straub, R. E.
    Sundet, K.
    Taylor, A. M.
    Taylor, K. D.
    Tzoulaki, I.
    Tzourio, C.
    Uitterlinden, A.
    Vitart, V.
    Voineskos, A. N.
    Kaprio, J.
    Wagner, M.
    Wagner, H.
    Weinhold, L.
    Wen, K. H.
    Widen, E.
    Yang, Q.
    Zhao, W.
    Adams, H. H. H.
    Arking, D. E.
    Bilder, R. M.
    Bitsios, P.
    Boerwinkle, E.
    Chiba-Falek, O.
    Corvin, A.
    De Jager, P. L.
    Debette, S.
    Donohoe, G.
    Elliott, P.
    Fitzpatrick, A. L.
    Gill, M.
    Glahn, D. C.
    Hägg, S.
    Hansell, N. K.
    Hariri, A. R.
    Ikram, M. K.
    Jukema, J. W.
    Vuoksimaa, E.
    Keller, M. C.
    Kremen, W. S.
    Launer, L.
    Lindenberger, U.
    Palotie, A.
    Pedersen, N. L.
    Pendleton, N.
    Porteous, D. J.
    Räikkönen, K.
    Raitakari, O. T.
    Ramirez, A.
    Reinvang, I.
    Rudan, I.
    Rujescu, D.
    Schmidt, R.
    Schmidt, H.
    Schofield, P. W.
    Schofield, P. R.
    Starr, J. M.
    Steen, V. M.
    Trollor, J. N.
    Turner, S. T.
    Van Duijn, C. M.
    Villringer, A.
    Weinberger, D. R.
    Weir, D. R.
    Wilson, J. F.
    Malhotra, A.
    McIntosh, A. M.
    Gale, C. R.
    Seshadri, S.
    Mosley, T.H., Jr.
    Bressler, J.
    Lencz, T.
    Deary, I. J.
    Study of 300,486 individuals identifies 148 independent genetic loci influencing general cognitive function2018In: Nature Communications, ISSN 2041-1723, E-ISSN 2041-1723, Vol. 9, no 1, article id 2098Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    General cognitive function is a prominent and relatively stable human trait that is associated with many important life outcomes. We combine cognitive and genetic data from the CHARGE and COGENT consortia, and UK Biobank (total N = 300,486; age 16-102) and find 148 genome-wide significant independent loci (P < 5 × 10-8) associated with general cognitive function. Within the novel genetic loci are variants associated with neurodegenerative and neurodevelopmental disorders, physical and psychiatric illnesses, and brain structure. Gene-based analyses find 709 genes associated with general cognitive function. Expression levels across the cortex are associated with general cognitive function. Using polygenic scores, up to 4.3% of variance in general cognitive function is predicted in independent samples. We detect significant genetic overlap between general cognitive function, reaction time, and many health variables including eyesight, hypertension, and longevity. In conclusion we identify novel genetic loci and pathways contributing to the heritability of general cognitive function.

  • 24.
    Donohue, Dana
    et al.
    Centre for Augmentative and Alternative Communication, University of Pretoria, South Africa.
    Bornman, Juan
    Centre for Augmentative and Alternative Communication, University of Pretoria, South Africa.
    Granlund, Mats
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
    Household size is associated with unintelligible speech in children who have intellectual disabilities: A South African study2015In: Developmental Neurorehabilitation, ISSN 1751-8423, E-ISSN 1751-8431, Vol. 18, no 6, p. 402-406Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to examine whether four socioeconomic factors, namely caregiver age, caregiver education, family income and/or household size were related to the presence of motor delays or unintelligible speech in South African children with intellectual disabilities. Methods: Caregivers of children with intellectual disabilities completed a biographical questionnaire regarding their home environments. Other items on the questionnaire queried whether their children experienced co-occurring developmental impairments of motor delays or unintelligible speech. Results: A total of 145 caregivers were included in the analyses. Two logistic regressions were run with the set of four socioeconomic factors as predictors, and motor delays and intelligible speech as the outcome variables. Household size was a statistically significant predictor of whether children evidenced intelligible speech. Conclusion: Children living in dwellings with more people were less likely to have intelligible speech. The processes through which large household size might influence children’s language are discussed.

  • 25.
    Elgmark Andersson, Elisabeth
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. CHILD.
    Bedics, Beate Kärrdahl
    Falkmer, Torbjörn
    Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation. Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. CHILD.
    Mild Traumatic Brain Injuries: A 10-year follow-up2011In: Journal of Rehabilitation Medicine, ISSN 1650-1977, E-ISSN 1651-2081, Vol. 43, p. 323-329Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective and design: Long-term consequences of mild traumatic brain injuries were investigated based on a 10-year follow-up of patients from a previously published randomized controlled study of mild traumatic brain injuries. One aim was to describe changes over time after mild traumatic brain injuries in terms of the extent of persisting post-concussion symptoms, life satisfaction, perceived health, activities of daily living, changes in life roles and sick leave. Another aim was to identify differences between the intervention and control groups.

    Patients: The intervention group comprised 142 persons and the control group 56 persons.

    Methods: Postal questionnaires with a response rate of 56%.

    Results: No differences over time were found for the intervention and control groups in terms of post-concussion symptoms. In the intervention group some variables in life satisfaction, perceived health and daily life were decreased. Some roles had changed over the years for both groups. No other differences between the intervention and control groups were found. However, in both groups sick leave decreased.

    Conclusion: Early individual intervention by a qualified rehabilitation team does not appear to impact on the long-term outcome for persons with symptoms related to mild traumatic brain injuries. The status after approximately 3 weeks is indicative of the status after 10 years.

     

     

  • 26.
    Enache, Daniela
    et al.
    Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Division of Neurogeriatrics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Solomon, Alina
    Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Division of Neurogeriatrics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden, and Institute of Clinical Medicine/Neurology, University of Eastern Finland, Kuopio, Finland.
    Cavallin, Lena
    Department of Clinical Science, Intervention and Technology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Kåreholt, Ingemar
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ARN-J (Aging Research Network - Jönköping). Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Aging Research Center, Karolinska Institutet and Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Kramberger, Milica Gregoric
    Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Division of Neurogeriatrics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden, and Department of Neurology, University Medical Centre, Ljubljana, Slovenia.
    Aarsland, Dag
    Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Division of Neurogeriatrics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden, and Center for Age-Related Diseases, Psychiatric Clinic, Stavanger University Hospital, Stavanger, Norway.
    Kivipelto, Miia
    Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Division of Neurogeriatrics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden, and Institute of Clinical Medicine/Neurology, University of Eastern Finland, Kuopio, Finland.
    Eriksdotter, Maria
    Department of Geriatric Medicine, Memory Clinic, Karolinska University Hospital-Huddinge, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Winblad, Bengt
    Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Division of Neurogeriatrics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Jelic, Vesna
    Department of Geriatric Medicine, Memory Clinic, Karolinska University Hospital-Huddinge, Stockholm, Sweden.
    CAIDE Dementia Risk Score and biomarkers of neurodegeneration in memory clinic patients without dementia2016In: Neurobiology of Aging, ISSN 0197-4580, E-ISSN 1558-1497, Vol. 42, p. 124-131Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to explore cross-sectional associations between Cardiovascular Risk Factors, Aging and Dementia Study (CAIDE) Dementia Risk Score and dementia-related cerebrospinal fluid and neuroimaging biomarkers in 724 patients without dementia from the Memory Clinic at Karolinska University Hospital, Huddinge, Sweden. We additionally evaluated the score's capacity to predict dementia. Two risk score versions were calculated: one including age, gender, obesity, hyperlipidemia, and hypertension; and one additionally including apolipoprotein E (APOE) ε4 carrier status. Cerebrospinal fluid was analyzed for amyloid β (Aβ), total tau, and phosphorylated tau. Visual assessments of medial temporal lobe atrophy (MTA), global cortical atrophy-frontal subscale, and Fazekas scale for white matter changes (WMC) were performed. Higher CAIDE Dementia Risk Score (version without APOE) was significantly associated with higher total tau, more severe MTA, WMC, and global cortical atrophy-frontal subscale. Higher CAIDE Dementia Risk Score (version with APOE) was associated with reduced Aβ, more severe MTA, and WMC. CAIDE Dementia Risk Score version with APOE seemed to predict dementia better in this memory clinic population with short follow-up than the version without APOE.

  • 27.
    Farr, W. J.
    et al.
    Sussex Community NHS Foundation Trust, Brighton, West Sussex, UK.
    Male, I.
    Sussex Community NHS Foundation Trust, Brighton, West Sussex, UK.
    Green, Dido
    Department of Rehabilitation, Oxford Brookes University, Oxford, UK.
    Morris, C.
    Medical School, University of Exeter, Exeter, UK.
    Gage, H.
    School of Economics, University of Surrey, Surrey, UK.
    Bailey, S.
    Medical School. University of Exeter, Exeter, UK.
    Speller, S.
    Sussex Community NHS Foundation Trust, Brighton, West Sussex, UK.
    Colville, V.
    Sussex Community NHS Foundation Trust, Brighton, UK.
    Jackson, M.
    Sussex Community NHS Foundation Trust, Brighton, UK.
    Bremner, S.
    Brighton and Sussex Medical School, Brighton, UK.
    Memon, A.
    Brighton and Sussex Medical School, Brighton, UK.
    Current issues and challenges in research on virtual reality therapy for children with neurodisability2017In: Rehabilitation: Innovations and Challenges in the Use of Virtual Reality Technologies / [ed] W. Powell, A. Rizzo, P. M. Sharkey, & J. Merrick, Nova Science Publishers, Inc., 2017, p. 9-26Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 28.
    Farr, W. J.
    et al.
    Sussex Community NHS Foundation Trust, Brighton, West Sussex, UK.
    Male, I.
    Sussex Community NHS Foundation Trust, Brighton, West Sussex, UK.
    Green, Dido
    Department of Rehabilitation, Oxford Brookes University, Oxford, UK.
    Morris, C.
    Medical School, University of Exeter, Exeter, UK.
    Gage, H.
    School of Economics, University of Surrey, Surrey, UK.
    Bailey, S.
    Medical School. University of Exeter, Exeter, UK.
    Speller, S.
    Sussex Community NHS Foundation Trust, Brighton, West Sussex, UK.
    Colville, V.
    Sussex Community NHS Foundation Trust, Brighton, UK.
    Jackson, M.
    Sussex Community NHS Foundation Trust, Brighton, UK.
    Bremner, S.
    Brighton and Sussex Medical School, Brighton, UK.
    Memon, A.
    Brighton and Sussex Medical School, Brighton, UK.
    Current issues and challenges in research on virtual reality therapy for children with neurodisability2016In: Proceedings of the 11th International Conference in Disability, Virtual Reality and Associated Technologies, Los Angeles, California, USA, 20-22 September, 2016, 2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A PICO (population, intervention, comparison, outcome) approach is adopted to discuss issues and challenges in virtual reality therapy research in community health settings. Widespread variation within and between populations, e.g. co-morbid conditions, complicates treatment fidelity and applicability. Interventions require flexible dose and frequency to fit into children’s family circumstances, with clearly employed specialist paediatric research staff. Comparisons require adaptation to digital technology, and keep pace with development. Outcomes may overstate the impact of virtual reality therapy and technological novelty, while not fully unpacking hidden digital effects. A wide set of agreed, flexible, and patient-centred outcome measures are required to establish positive clinical baseline.

  • 29. Farr, William
    et al.
    Green, Dido
    Male, Ian
    Morris, Christopher
    Bailey, Sarah
    Gage, Heather
    Speller, Sandra
    Colville, Val
    Jackson, M.
    Bremner, Stephen
    Memon, Anjum
    Feasibility of an RCT to evaluate home-based virtual reality therapy in children with cerebral palsy2017Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 30.
    Farr, William
    et al.
    Sussex Community NHS Trust.
    Male, Ian
    Sussex Community NHS Trust.
    Green, Dido
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Oxford Brookes University.
    Morris, Christopher
    University of Exeter Medical School.
    Gage, Heather
    University of Surrey.
    Bailey, Sarah
    University of Exeter Medical School.
    Speller, Sandra
    Sussex Community NHS Trust.
    Colville, Val
    Sussex Community NHS Trust.
    Jackson, Mandy
    Sussex Community NHS Trust.
    Bremner, Stephen
    Brighton and Sussex Medical School.
    Memon, Anjum
    Brighton and Sussex Medical School.
    Methodological issues of using placebos in interventions based on digital technology2017In: Journal of Mobile Technology in Medicine, ISSN 1839-7808, Vol. 6, no 2, p. 56-63Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background/Aims: Use of placebo is the ideal for comparison in clinical trials to reduce biases. With digital technology being used more frequently in healthcare interventions, how do we determine the placebo effect where interventions exploit technology? If placebo in medicine is traditionally defined by a lack of pharmacological agents, how might we begin to move towards controlling for effects of digital technology?

    Method: This paper explores the traditional placebo effect and discusses its impact in healthcare contexts with digital technology with reference to a particular trial. Different meanings of placebo in the context of evaluating technology suggest new challenges and positive consequences.

    Results: Methodological considerations are discussed, which enabled the development of a placebo-controlled evaluation of a digital technology in healthcare and rehabilitation.

    Conclusion: Digital placebo was controlled in our trial by employing technology across all groups in the absence of evidence-based practice and shows how to control for unknown and hidden effects of technology.

  • 31.
    Garcia-Ptacek, Sara
    et al.
    Division of Clinical Geriatrics, Center for Alzheimer Research, Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Kåreholt, Ingemar
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ARN-J (Aging Research Network - Jönköping). Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Aging Research Center, Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Karolinska Institutet and Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Cermakova, Pavla
    Division of Neurogeriatrics, Center for Alzheimer Research, Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Rizzuto, Debora
    Aging Research Center, Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Karolinska Institutet and Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Religa, Dorota
    Department of Geriatric Medicine, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Eriksdotter, Maria
    Division of Clinical Geriatrics, Center for Alzheimer Research, Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Causes of Death According to Death Certificates in Individuals with Dementia: A Cohort from the Swedish Dementia Registry.2016In: Journal of The American Geriatrics Society, ISSN 0002-8614, E-ISSN 1532-5415, Vol. 64, no 11, p. e137-e142Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVES: The causes of death in dementia are not established, particularly in rarer dementias. The aim of this study is to calculate risk of death from specific causes for a broader spectrum of dementia diagnoses.

    DESIGN: Cohort study.

    SETTING: Swedish Dementia Registry (SveDem), 2007-2012.

    PARTICIPANTS: Individuals with incident dementia registered in SveDem (N = 28,609); median follow-up 741 days. Observed deaths were 5,368 (19%).

    MEASUREMENTS: Information on number of deaths and causes of mortality was obtained from death certificates. Odds ratios for the presence of dementia on death certificates were calculated. Hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated using Cox hazards regression for cause-specific mortality, using Alzheimer's dementia (AD) as reference. Hazard ratios for death for each specific cause of death were compared with hazard ratios of death from all causes (P-values from t-tests).

    RESULTS: The most frequent underlying cause of death in this cohort was cardiovascular (37%), followed by dementia (30%). Dementia and cardiovascular causes appeared as main or contributory causes on 63% of certificates, followed by respiratory (26%). Dementia was mentioned less in vascular dementia (VaD; 57%). Compared to AD, cardiovascular mortality was higher in individuals with VaD than in those with AD (HR = 1.82, 95% CI = 1.64-2.02). Respiratory death was higher in individuals with Lewy body dementia (LBD, including Parkinson's disease dementia and dementia with Lewy bodies, HR = 2.16, 95% CI = 1.71-2.71), and the risk of respiratory death was higher than expected from the risk for all-cause mortality. Participants with frontotemporal dementia were more likely to die from external causes of death than those with AD (HR = 2.86, 95% CI = 1.53-5.32).

    CONCLUSION: Dementia is underreported on death certificates as main and contributory causes. Individuals with LBD had a higher risk of respiratory death than those with AD.

  • 32.
    Gatz, Margaret
    et al.
    Department of Psychology, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, USA.
    Jang, Jung Yun
    Department of Psychology, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, USA.
    Karlsson, Ida K.
    Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Pedersen, Nancy L.
    Department of Psychology, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, USA.
    Dementia: Genes, environments, interactions2014In: Behavior genetics of cognition across the lifespan / [ed] D. Finkel & C. A. Reynolds, New York: Springer, 2014, p. 201-231Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Dementia is an increasingly prevalent disorder as the world population ages, with Alzheimer disease the most common cause. Twin studies find concordance to be substantially higher among monozygotic as compared with dizygotic twin pairs. While a few genes have been identified that are responsible for early-onset Alzheimer disease, they account for well under 5 % of all cases. Among susceptibility genes for Alzheimer disease identified by association studies, population attributable fraction for the most prominent of these—apolipoprotein E—is estimated to be about 25 %, whereas other genes at best predict another 20 %. There are few strong environmental risk or protective factors, with vascular risks the best established, although with mechanisms still not fully understood. It seems likely that clusters of risk alleles, interactions between risk alleles and environmental exposures, and epigenetic mechanisms play a role in explaining Alzheimer disease, with different combinations of influences culminating in the observed pathophysiology. In particular, environmental exposures early in life could lead to deleterious changes in gene expression in late life.

  • 33.
    Gorjy, Rebecca Soraya
    et al.
    School of Occupational Therapy and Social Work Curtin University Perth, Western Australia Australia.
    Fielding, Angela
    School of Occupational Therapy and Social Work Curtin University Perth, Western Australia Australia.
    Falkmer, Marita
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD. School of Occupational Therapy and Social Work, Faculty of Health Sciences, Curtin University, Perth, Australia.
    "It's better than it used to be": Perspectives of adolescent siblings of children with an autism spectrum condition2017In: Child & Family Social Work, ISSN 1356-7500, E-ISSN 1365-2206, Vol. 22, no 4, p. 1488-1496Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article reports on the lived experiences of 11 adolescents who have a brother or a sister with a diagnosis of autism spectrum condition. Through semistructured, in-depth, in-person interviews, these adolescents shared their experiences and perceptions. These exploratory findings can be used to inform the practice of social workers and other health professionals, and future research. Implications for practice focus on the importance of exploring experiences and perceptions of siblings of children diagnosed with autism spectrum condition to enhance support services for these siblings.

  • 34.
    Green, Dido
    Centre for Rehabilitation, Oxford Brookes University, Oxford, United Kingdom.
    Are proprioceptive functions affected in Duchenne muscular dystrophy?2014In: Developmental Medicine & Child Neurology, ISSN 0012-1622, E-ISSN 1469-8749, Vol. 56, no 9, p. 805-806Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 35.
    Green, Dido
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Caring for Carers2018Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 36.
    Green, Dido
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD. Centre for Rehabilitation, Oxford Brookes University, Oxford, United Kingdom.
    Challenges in combining upper limb and lower limb interventions in protocols for children with brain injury2017In: Developmental Medicine & Child Neurology, ISSN 0012-1622, E-ISSN 1469-8749, Vol. 59, no 3, p. 335-335Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 37.
    Green, Dido
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Designing ‘free’ spaces for children with disabilities2018In: Developmental Medicine & Child Neurology, ISSN 0012-1622, E-ISSN 1469-8749, Vol. 60, no 8, p. 730-730Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 38.
    Green, Dido
    Guy's and St Thomas' NHS Foundation Trust, London, United Kingdom.
    Developmental coordination disorder in children with ADHD and physical therapy intervention2010In: Developmental Medicine & Child Neurology, ISSN 0012-1622, E-ISSN 1469-8749, Vol. 52, no 3, p. 308-308Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 39.
    Green, Dido
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    From Body Functions to Activity Competence, Participation & Engagement2018Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 40.
    Green, Dido
    NIHR GSTFT/KCL Biomedical Research Centre, Newcomen Centre, Guy's Hospital, London, United Kingdom.
    Hand function and fine motor activities2009In: Finnie's Handling the Young Child with Cerebral Palsy at Home / [ed] Eva Bower, Elsevier, 2009, 4, p. 243-268Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 41.
    Green, Dido
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    New international clinical recommendations on Developmental Coordination Disorders: Review and Implications for Occupational Therapy practice2019Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 42.
    Green, Dido
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Overlapping samples in systematic reviews and meta-analyses: Interpreting findings of cognitive outcomes following preterm birth2018In: Developmental Medicine & Child Neurology, ISSN 0012-1622, E-ISSN 1469-8749, Vol. 60, no 12, p. 1290-1290Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 43.
    Green, Dido
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Prognostication and the unpredictable nature of HIV encephalopathy with bilateral lower limb spasticity2017In: Developmental Medicine & Child Neurology, ISSN 0012-1622, E-ISSN 1469-8749, Vol. 59, p. 348-349Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 44.
    Green, Dido
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Time and relativity in therapeutic rehabilitation2017In: Developmental Medicine & Child Neurology, ISSN 0012-1622, E-ISSN 1469-8749, Vol. 59, no 2Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 45.
    Green, Dido
    Centre for Rehabilitation, Oxford Brookes University, Oxford, United Kingdom.
    Translating evidence into practice2014In: Developmental Medicine & Child Neurology, ISSN 0012-1622, E-ISSN 1469-8749, Vol. 56, no 12, p. 1132-1133Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 46.
    Green, Dido
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Virtual reality for rehabilitation : Moving forward2018Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 47.
    Green, Dido
    et al.
    Newcomen Centre, Guy's Hospital, London, United Kingdom.
    Chambers, M. E.
    Sugden, D. A.
    Does subtype of developmental coordination disorder count: Is there a differential effect on outcome following intervention?2008In: Human Movement Science, ISSN 0167-9457, E-ISSN 1872-7646, Vol. 27, no 2, p. 363-382Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    It is well known that developmental coordination disorder (DCD) is a heterogeneous condition in which children frequently present with co-occurring conditions in addition to their motor difficulties. This study considered whether there would be a differential effect of a group treatment program on subtypes of perceptual and movement problems or associated co-occurring conditions. A subset of children (n = 43) from a larger clinical sample (n = 100) with DCD participated in a 2 frac(1, 4) year cross-over intervention study which followed the cognitive orientation to daily occupational performance (CO-OP) approach. Original subtypes were determined by contrasting the current sample with previously published subtyping studies in DCD [Hoare, D. (1994). Subtypes of developmental coordination disorder. Adapted Physical Activity Quarterly, 11, 158-169; Macnab, J. J., Miller, L. T., & Polatajko, H. J. (2001). The search for subtypes of DCD: Is cluster analysis the answer? Human Movement Science, 20, 49-72]. No advantage was conferred to any subtype although children with more profound and complex difficulties at initial assessment, despite progress following intervention, were most likely to have continuing difficulties at the end of the project.

  • 48.
    Green, Dido
    et al.
    Guy's ad St Thomas' NHS Foundation Trust, London, United Kingdom.
    Charman, T.
    Pickles, A.
    Chandler, S.
    Loucas, T.
    Simonoff, E.
    Baird, G.
    Impairment in movement skills of children with autistic spectrum disorders2009In: Developmental Medicine & Child Neurology, ISSN 0012-1622, E-ISSN 1469-8749, Vol. 51, no 4, p. 311-316Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim:

    We undertook this study to explore the degree of impairment in movement skills in children with autistic spectrum disorders (ASD) and a wide IQ range.

    Methods:

    Movement skills were measured using the Movement Assessment Battery for Children (M-ABC) in a large, well defined, population-derived group of children (n = 101: 89 males, 12 females; mean age 11 y 4 mo, SD 10 mo; range 10 y-14 y 3 mo) with childhood autism and broader ASD and a wide range of IQ scores. Additionally, we tested whether a parent-completed questionnaire, the Developmental Coordination Disorder Questionnaire (DCDQ), was useful in identifying children who met criteria for movement impairments after assessment (n = 97 with complete M-ABCs and DCDQs).

    Results:

    Of the children with ASD, 79% had definite movement impairments on the M-ABC; a further 10% had borderline problems. Children with childhood autism were more impaired than children with broader ASD, and children with an IQ less than 70 were more impaired than those with IQ more than 70. This is consistent with the view that movement impairments may arise from a more severe neurological impairment that also contributes to intellectual disability and more severe autism. Movement impairment was not associated with everyday adaptive behaviour once the effect of IQ was controlled for. The DCDQ performed moderately well as a screen for possible motor difficulties.

    Interretation:

    Movement impairments are common in children with ASD. Systematic assessment of movement abilities should be considered a routine investigation.

  • 49.
    Green, Dido
    et al.
    Centre for Rehabilitation, Oxford Brookes University, Marston Road Campus, Jack Straw s Lane, Oxford, United Kingdom.
    Lim, M.
    Lang, B.
    Pohl, K.
    Turk, J.
    Sensory Processing Difficulties in Opsoclonus-Myoclonus Syndrome2016In: Journal of Child Neurology, ISSN 0883-0738, E-ISSN 1708-8283, Vol. 31, no 8, p. 965-970Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Opsoclonus-myoclonus syndrome is a rare but serious neurological condition resulting in loss of control of eye movements, often accompanied by difficulties in posture and movement control with reports of sensory sensitivities potentially impacting on behavior. This pilot study characterizes the presence of atypical sensory behaviors in opsoclonus-myoclonus syndrome through questionnaire survey of a cohort of families. The Short Sensory Profile, Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scale, and Developmental Behaviour Checklist were distributed to 30 families; 16 were returned anonymously. Atypical sensory behaviors were identified in a large proportion (62.5%). Children reported as being more anxious showed greater sensitivity to auditory stimuli, U(14) 11, P =.026. This is consistent with recent recognition of more extensive disease neurocognitive effects in Opsoclonus-myoclonus syndrome. Further research is needed to increase understanding of the complex pathology of this disease and to provide indicators for sensory and behavioral as well as pharmacological interventions.

  • 50.
    Green, Dido
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Rehabilitation. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
    Mount, M.
    Bobath Children’s Therapy Centre Wales, Cardiff, UK.
    Jon-Dare, G.
    Bobath Children’s Therapy Centre Wales, Cardiff, UK.
    Carroll, J.
    Bobath Children’s Therapy Centre Wales, Cardiff, UK.
    Relationship between capacity and performance in young children with unilateral Cerebral Palsy and impact on participation2018Conference paper (Refereed)
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