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  • 1.
    Bruns, Volker
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Accounting and Finance.
    Holland, Dan
    Jon M. Huntsman School of Business, Utah State University, United States .
    Shepherd, Dean A.
    Kelley School of Business, Indiana University, Bloomington, IN, United States.
    Wiklund, Johan
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS Entrepreneurship Centre. Department of Entrepreneurship and Emerging Enterprises, Whitman School of Management, Syracuse University, United States.
    The role of human capital in loan officers' decision policies2016In: Decision making in entrepreneurship: selected joint papers of Dean A. Shepherd / [ed] Dean A Shepherd, Edward Elgar Publishing, 2016, p. 315-336Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Using a human-capital perspective and the similarity-attraction paradigm, we examine the role of general and specific human capital in the decision policies of 114 Swedish loan officers in their assessments of small-business loan requests. We found that human capital characteristics had marginal impact on decision policy contingencies and that specific human capital had no significant influence on the probability of loan approval. However, we did find that the similarity between the loan officers’ human capital and the pplicants’ human capital was a significant indicator of loan approval. The findings offer interesting insight into the heterogeneity of loan decision processes and outcomes and future research opportunities are suggested.

  • 2.
    Bruns, Volker
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Accounting and Finance.
    Holland, Dan
    Shepherd, Dean
    Wiklund, Johan
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, EMM (Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Management). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS Entrepreneurship Centre.
    The role of human capital in loan officers' decision policies2008In: Entrepreneurship: Theory & Practice, ISSN 1042-2587, E-ISSN 1540-6520, Vol. 32, no 3, p. 485-506Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Using a human-capital perspective and the similarity-attraction paradigm, we examine the role of general and specific human capital in the decision policies of 114 Swedish loan officers in their assessments of small-business loan requests. We found that human capital characteristics had marginal impact on decision policy contingencies and that specific human capital had no significant influence on the probability of loan approval. However, we did find that the similarity between the loan officers’ human capital and the pplicants’ human capital was a significant indicator of loan approval. The findings offer interesting insight into the heterogeneity of loan decision processes and outcomes and future research opportunities are suggested.

  • 3.
    Rogozea, Dan
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering.
    Design, 3D Bioprinting, and Testing of Otic Prosthesis2018Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The middle ear is a complex organ with multiple functions. It is prone to accidental, genetic, excessive noise exposure, or age-related damage. Its main role is to convey and amplify the mechanical vibrations of the tympanic membrane to the acoustic nerve through three connected small bones, the ossicles; malleus, incus, and stapes. When severely damaged, the most used solution is currently a partial or total ossicle replacement with inorganic titanium prostheses, which are not anatomically similar. However, 3D models derived from micro-CT scans of human ossicular chains are freely available for research and educational purposes in high resolution 3D files. Therefore, these files were scaled to anatomical size and used to print partial models of the malleus and incus using an extrusion contact method using a bioprinter and OsteoInk, a calcium phosphate-based paste sold by the bioprinting company regenHU. The use of this biologically analogous material to 3D print anatomically sized and shaped ossicles is novel. The process and settings for bioprinting the malleus and incus were devised and tested for repeatability. OsteoInk was found suitable to form hard bone-like objects after printing and curing. However, for this process to be successful with OsteoInk, the models required a flat base; the first .560 mm of the virtual model were not printed. A support structure is required for creating complete ossicles, but the hydrogel and polymer structures attempted were not deemed feasible. The support structure could be created by combining the OsteoInk with other biomaterials, or by fibers printed through Melt Electrospinning Writing. The workflow devised in this project is applicable to other bioprinters, and to thus to further the research in the field of bioprinting.

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