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  • 1.
    Aarikka-Stenroos, Leena
    et al.
    Department of Industrial Management CITER (Center for Innovation and Technology Research), Tampere University of Technology, Tampere, Finland.
    Peltola, Tero
    Department of Industrial Management CITER (Center for Innovation and Technology Research), Tampere University of Technology, Tampere, Finland.
    Rikkiev, Andrei
    Department of Industrial Management CITER (Center for Innovation and Technology Research), Tampere University of Technology, Tampere, Finland.
    Saari, Ulla A.
    Department of Industrial Management CITER (Center for Innovation and Technology Research), Tampere University of Technology, Tampere, Finland.
    Multiple facets of innovation and business ecosystem research: the foci, methods and future agenda2016In: ISPIM Innovation Symposium, Manchester: The International Society for Professional Innovation Management (ISPIM) , 2016Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    An ecosystem approach to innovation and business has become increasingly relevant in contemporary research but research knowledge is scattered across divergent disciplines. The aim of this study is thus, on the basis of an extensive, multidisciplinary literature review to integrate the extant knowledge on innovation and business ecosystems and analyze how they are conceptualized, analyzed, captured and depicted. By conducting a systematic multi-phase content analysis of over 230 articles selected from the Web of Science, we will build a comprehensive picture on the research streams of innovation/business ecosystem research, the used methods, foci, illustrations/visualizations of business/innovation ecosystems and build a research agenda for future research. This article contributes by providing a structured analysis on this multi-disciplinary research area, aggregating the current knowledge and generating a research agenda on innovation/business ecosystems - a theme that is emergent, multifaceted, and crucial to innovative companies as well as researchers in the fields of innovation, management, technology and marketing.

  • 2.
    Alipour, Alireza
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School.
    Rahimpour, Mehdi
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School.
    Sustainability Barriers in SMEs: A study of strength of sustainability barriers and practical solutions in Green product lifecycle at SMEs2020Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Small and medium-sized firms (SMEs) have their impact on the environment besides their benefits.  While a business grows, naturally destroying impacts are also growing. SMEs have a variety of barriers to be green and sustainable. There are some simple and non-complicated actions that firms can take, to reduce their destructive impacts on the environment.  This study analyses the existing barriers and focuses on small and medium sizes firms (SMEs) around Jonkoping. Besides, this study includes interviews with successful and sustainable companies and reflects their solutions to overcome those barriers in a different step of the green product lifecycle.

    Purpose: This is a practical study of how sustainability process in SMEs can drive product lifecycle greener. The purpose of this thesis is to study the existing practical and simple solutions for different environmental sustainability barriers in SMEs which located in Jonkoping region. Also, it goals to reveal solutions which applies by sustainable businesses to overcome to the sustainability barriers.

    Method: To fulfil the purpose of the thesis, an experimental research design was applied, and the data was provided from in-depth, semi-structured interviews. Ten interviews were conducted with successful businesses in sustainability practice in the Jonkoping region. The data analysis for this study was created by an inductive approach.

    Conclusion: This study has revealed that the successful green businesses categorizing their barriers into general, segmental, and individual groups. After that, by evaluating the strength of obstacles in different steps of GPL and considering their available resources they plan to apply proper solution. The other main finding in this thesis was a practical framework according to what have been done in our research.

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  • 3.
    Andersson, Elin
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management.
    Borg, Felicia
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management.
    Ett nytt perspektiv på plastavfallsflöden - från linjärt till cirkulärt: En kartläggning av plastavfallsflöden i GGVV-regionen2021Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – The purpose of the study is to investigate opportunities for improvement in flows around region-based plastic waste management. To be able to answer the purpose of the study, the following two questions were formulated: 

    • What factors should be considered when introducing circular plastic waste streams? 
    • What is the responsibility of regional stakeholders in the introduction of circular plastic flows? 

    Method – The study is of an inductive approach in the form of a qualitative case study with an analysis unit based on two different analysis levels. In the study, the analysis unit is plastic waste management, which is broken down into the regional and actor level. To answer the presented questions, empirical data was collected in the form of interviews, questionnaires, and a document study. The Gioia method was used to transform data from interviews and surveys into themes and common factors with theoretical foundations. The method also makes it easier for the reader to follow the chain of evidence from data to analysis. 

    Findings – The results of the study show that today's plastic waste flows mainly follow a linear value flow and that the necessary flow must be changed towards a circular plastic waste flow. When introducing circular plastic waste streams, the following factors need to be considered for implementation to contribute to improvement: Design, Sorting, Transport and Economy. Furthermore, the study shows that the issue of liability is important for the possibility of claiming within the plastic waste flow and that today it is not clear who is responsible and when. This contributes to the fact that changes in plastic waste management must be clarified and that those responsible need to be named. The conclusions for the study and the result are that the problems surrounding plastic waste management need to be considered from a holistic perspective along the entire supply chain and that all actors involved must take their responsibility. 

    Implications – The study resulted in theoretical and practical contributions based on new knowledge. The theoretical contribution that the study has made is plastic waste management based on a regional approach where the theory today mainly deals with a circular economy based on company cases and national level. Additional theoretical contributions were made through common problem areas that were presented based on four factors, design, sorting, transport, and economy. These factors together with the theory of circular economy contributed to a theoretical contribution based on a developed model of the linear flow, to a more circular and sustainable plastic waste flow. The practical contribution is in the form of an increased understanding of the regional actors in the problem and who carries the responsibility in the various parts of the flow. This study can be used to get other regions to improve and develop their plastic waste flow at a regional level that benefits all actors. 

    Limitations – The current Covid-19 pandemic has affected the implementation of the study in the form of limited opportunities for visits to actors in the value chain. Another limitation is the geographical delimitation where the study only examines the flow based on a selected region, a study comprising several regions would have contributed to a more generalizable result. 

    Keywords – Plastic waste, Circular economy, Sustainable plastic use, Plastic waste flow, Circular plastic flow 

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    Examensarbete_Andersson_Borg
  • 4.
    Aries, Myriam
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Civil Engineering and Lighting Science.
    Beute, Femke
    Light Green Wellbeing, Eindhoven, the Netherlands.
    Fischl, Géza
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Civil Engineering and Lighting Science.
    Assessment protocol and effects of two dynamic light patterns on human well-being and performance in a simulated and operational office environment2020In: Journal of Environmental Psychology, ISSN 0272-4944, E-ISSN 1522-9610, Vol. 69, article id 101409Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sophisticated electric lighting solutions like tuneable white-light LED-systems, varying in light amount and/or colour temperature, can help to supplement or mimic daylight. Today's office environments are increasingly being equipped with dynamic lighting solutions even though it is yet unknown what a dynamic pattern looks like to optimally support human performance and well-being. In a pilot study, a dual-experimental methodology was employed to examine the effects of a dynamic lighting pattern. Two opposite dynamic electric light patterns were applied both in a controlled laboratory study as well as in a quasi-controlled field study. A momentary questionnaire concerning different aspects of well-being was repeated multiple times during the duration of the experiment, complemented by two performance tasks. The current results were inconclusive and inconsistent between the two study types, carefully pointing at the need to test dynamic light patterns in the field before implementing it in a real office environment.

  • 5.
    Chandok, Ishaan
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management.
    Samuelsson, Martin
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management.
    Barriers in the Initial Acceptance Phase to Life-Cycle-Assessment: A Case Study of a Swedish Manufacturer2023Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: Sustainability and sustainable manufacturing has grown in importance in recent years, and more legislation and demands are put on organizations to show how their operations affect the environment. Life cycle assessment is a proactive and efficient sustainability tool to report a company’s effects on the environment. Nevertheless, life cycle assessments of products and organizations are complex and require significant resources. Therefore, the purpose of this study is to investigate what potential barriers can occur within the initial acceptance phase when implementing life cycle assessment in the manufacturing industry.

    Method: This research project is a single case study of a Swedish manufacturing company. The theory was deduced from literature where eight internal factors influencing the implementation of tools and systems created a foundation for data collection and analysis. Five semi-structured interviews and unstructured observations have been conducted to collect empirical data.

    Findings: Nine second-order themes of factors influencing the project as barriers have been identified that construct the three aggregate dimensions ̈Lack of management support ̈, ̈Lack of resources ̈, and ̈Lack of interdepartmental coordination ̈. From the empirical findings, it is also suggested that the three aggregate dimensions are interrelated. The interrelationships are later used to find three change suggestions to mitigate the barriers by using the relationships between the dimensions and targeting as many barriers as possible. Namely, ̈educate top management ̈, ̈enhance the education of project participants ̈, and ̈spend more time on project planning ̈.

    Implications: This study provides a deeper and more detailed understanding of different barriers within the initial acceptance phase of a project. It also gives further insights into various interrelationships between barriers and how one dimension can influence the other in both positive and negative ways. Furthermore, this study's findings can guide managers and practitioners in preparing for a project aiming to implement a tool or a system.

    Limitations: As in all interpretative research, the interpretations of the empirical data are based on subjective thoughts influenced by the researcher’s positionality, the relationships with the participants, and preconceived perceptions. Furthermore, this research project is a single case study, and the results apply to this case. The findings cannot be statistically generalizable, meaning that the theories and themes created in this report should not be seen as absolute truths but instead as suggestive theories within the field.

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  • 6.
    Cronstam, Oliver
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    Grönberg, Jacob
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    Influencing Factors in the Implementation of Green Management Practices: A Qualitative Study regarding Swedish SMEs in Logistics2017Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The subject of green management is today relatively unexplored in existing literature, especially regarding SMEs in logistics. To bridge this gap this study aims to find what factors influence the implementation of green management for SMEs in logistics. Furthermore, this study aims to address the influential weight of these factors to create an even greater understanding within the topic.

    The chosen research method of this paper is qualitative, and the empirical data is collected through semi-structured interviews with Swedish logistic companies who have acquired the environmental management system ISO 14001. Furthermore, the research approach of this study is deductive.

    When implementing green management, this paper has found 4 factors that influence a company in various ways. What also has been found is what factors that have more influential weight and are essential to make such implementation effective.

    The study provides both theoretical and practical implications. Theoretically it fills a gap current literature and further explains SMEs in logistics use of green management. Practically companies can draw from this study to see if they work effectively with green management or better prepare for a transition. The researchers of this study suggest that the factors of influence that are presented in the empirical findings should be tested in a quantitative study with a larger sample size to better measure the effect of each one in a practical context. 

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  • 7.
    Eklund, Axel
    et al.
    Jönköping University.
    Nilsson, Martin
    Jönköping University.
    Miljöledningssystem: En förberedande fallstudie för ISO 14001 certifiering2021Independent thesis Basic level (university diploma), 180 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Climate change has become a subject that is frequently reported in the media. There is an increased awareness and interest among consumers about environmental issues. Therefore, companies try to adapt their business to work in a more sustainable way. The ISO 14001 standard is a helpful tool to structure an environmental management system. It is an established framework on how companies can continuously improve their business to minimize the climate footprint. 

     

    This report is based on a company that aims to become certified according to ISO 14001. The company is ISO 9001 certified, and several areas are addressed in both standards, which is beneficial for the implementation of their environmental management system according to ISO 14001. The goal off this study is to prepare the company by identifying gaps in their current environmental management system compared to the ISO 14001 requirements. 

     

    The GAP-analysis determined the significance of the gap, by dividing gaps in three categories: Minor, Major and Critical. The result showed that almost half of the requirements is considered as minor gaps, which means that the company with minor actions can meet the requirements. The other half is categorized as major and critical gaps, which will need significant actions and resources to meet the requirements. The result from the GAP-analysis shows that the company, due to the similarities between ISO 14001 and ISO 9001, have a good potential to meet the requirements. To start their certification process, the study presents 18 actions based on the result from the gap-analysis for the company to consider.

     

    The purpose of ISO 14001 is not only for a company to get a certificate, but also to continuously improve their environmental management system. Therefore, the company must develop and increase their knowledge of the standard to fully understand it and there by fulfill its purpose.  

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  • 8.
    Falk, Jheffer
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre of Logistics and Supply Chain Management (CeLS).
    Nykvist, Erik
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre of Logistics and Supply Chain Management (CeLS).
    Green Transitions in Heavy Truck Transports: An explorative study on buyer-supplier challenges and enablers for green transition in the Swedish truck transportation industry2022Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Background 

    Global warming caused by greenhouse gas emissions necessitates a decrease in carbon emission caused by the truck transport industry. To combat the threat of global warming, goals are being set up on a global, national and corporate level. These goals are putting pressure on logistics service providers to decrease the emissions within the truck transport industry. Implementation of green practices is found to be especially challenging within heavy truck transport due to weight and distance of the transport characteristics. In order to achieve emission reductions, logistics service providers are dependent on the alignment with their transport buyers, known as shippers to implement green logistics practices.

    Purpose

    The purpose of this study is to identify challenges and enablers for sustainable green transitions within heavy truck transports among shippers and logistics service providers. The study formulates two research question to help achieve the purpose, these questions are focused on challenges and enablers among both shippers and logistics service providers. 

    Method

    The study employs an explorative research approach in a multiple case study setting. Three configurations of shipper-LSP relationships are studied and analyzed through thematic analysis, the researchers also conducted a cross-case analysis to compare and identify similarities and differences between the cases in order to draw conclusions. 

    Conclusion

    A green transition within the heavy truck transport sector face numerous challenges. The challenges include a high dependency on vehicle development, lacking infrastructure, alignment issues between shippers and logistics service providers and trade off dilemmas. In order to overcome the issues findings, suggest that shippers and LSPs should focus on creating shared goals in order to facilitate implementation of green logistics practices and mitigate the challenges. 

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  • 9. Farmanli, Ramin
    et al.
    Mustafa, Ahmed
    Kartläggning av företagens användning av de 3R:en2018Independent thesis Basic level (university diploma), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: To map the companies’ use of the specific 3R’s (reuse, remanufacture and recycle) as well as gain an understanding of  the cooperation opportunities between manufacturing organizations and companies that work with the 3R’s:

     

       1) What factors play a role in the companies’ use of the specific 3R’s?

       2) Which cooperation opportunities do the companies’ see from a sustainability perspective?

     

    Method: The study was based on a multiple case design which consisted interviews. The interviews were based on companies that manufacture and develop electronic and electrical equipment (EEE) and companies who are engaged in taking care of the used EEE. The study also contained different literature studies in sustainability, which further lead to the creation of the theoretical framework in cooperation with the purpose of the study. Between the theoretical framework and the study's empiricism an analysis could be carried out, which also contributed to the results of the study.

     

    Result: The study has resulted in the identification of several different factors for the specific 3R’s, together with cooperation opportunities between manufacturing organizations of EEE and companies that take care of the consumed EEE based on the specific 3R’s. Where economic sustainability, i.e. profit maximization has been the factor that has permeated a large part of the results, together with some influence from environmental considerations.

     

    Implications: The study does not establish a new theory but bases itself on existing theories that have been tested in reality through interviews. During this study, it has been clear that the economic factors are one of the most important elements that determine how companies choose to work. Profit maximization is such a big factor that it also affects and outweighs environmental considerations when placed against each other. Environmental considerations are usually less considered than profit maximization but should weigh at least as much as profit maximization during the decision-making process.

     

    Limitations:

    • The study is based only on companies located in Sweden.

    • This study does not address/treat social sustainability or social considerations.

    • The study is based on producer companies that manufacture and develop electronic and electrical products as well as companies that work with reuse, remanufacture and recycling of electronic and electrical products.

     

    Key words: Waste management, End of life, supply chain, Life cycle analysis, reverse logistic, Waste electrical and electronic equipment, reuse, remanufacture, recycle.

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  • 10.
    Fobbe, Lea
    et al.
    Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, University of Gävle, Gävle, Sweden.
    Hilletofth, Per
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design. Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, University of Gävle, Gävle, Sweden.
    Moving toward a circular economy in manufacturing organizations: the role of circular stakeholder engagement practices2023In: The International Journal of Logistics Management, ISSN 0957-4093, Vol. 34, no 3, p. 674-698Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose

    The circular economy (CE) approach has been acknowledged as key for manufacturing organizations wishing to overcome sustainability challenges. However, the transition has been slow. Stakeholder engagement is a driver of the transition, but there is limited knowledge on stakeholder engagement practices in a CE context. The purpose of this paper is thus to explore with whom, on what and how organizations engage with stakeholders to implement CE as part of sustainability efforts.

    Design/methodology/approach

    This study is situated at the intersection of CE, stakeholder theory and supply chain literature. A case study with three Swedish manufacturing organizations was conducted to explore stakeholder engagement practices that facilitate the implementation of CE in organizational practice and the supply chain, considering conceptual differences between stakeholder engagement for sustainability and CE.

    Findings

    This study provides empirical evidence on how manufacturing organizations engage stakeholders to implement CE as part of organizations' sustainability efforts. The study highlights that manufacturing organizations have to move not only from linear to circular resource flows, but also from linear to circular stakeholder engagement. Such engagement can be achieved by extending with whom, expanding on what and leveling up how stakeholders are engaged.

    Originality/value

    This study provides an enhanced conceptual understanding of stakeholder engagement in the CE context and discusses differences regarding stakeholder engagement based on linear thinking. The study emphasizes the role of circular stakeholder engagement practices for the transition toward CE in manufacturing organizations.

  • 11.
    Franzén, Oskar
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School.
    Guo, Liyi
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School.
    Implementation Of Eco-Design In Product Development: Knowledge management for effective eco-design implementation2021Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 15 credits / 22,5 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The accumulating concern for environmental change has increased the need for companies to take a closer consideration to the negative impact of their operations. One effective approach to mitigate the impact is to, from the very first stages when a product is developed, analyse the environmental impact of the product’s entire lifecycle from the raw materials extruded from the ground to the disposal of the product. This type of practice is often referred to as eco-design. Unfortunately, the rate of companies implementing these practices are progressing slowly and a truly sustainable society is yet not in reach.

    Purpose: This study aims to investigate some of the most commonly cited obstacles in previous research. These problems can be concluded as the lack of specialized competencies, regarding the environmental impact of products in design teams. The reason this is problematic is that the practice of eco-design often requires a lot of information to be interpreted by a person with knowledge in the field. Companies have attempts to solve this issue by hiring eco-design specialists, however this often leads to difficulties in communication and disagreements with product developers. Therefore, this relationship between different stakeholders has been the second focus of the thesis. To find solutions to these problems the topic will be investigated from a knowledge management perspective.

    Method: To begin with, background data was reviewed to give a firm understanding of the topic and to create the basis of the theoretical framework. Later a multiple case study of two companies were performed and empirical data was gathered mainly from interviews. The empirical findings were analysed and compared to the theoretical framework in order to answer the research question.

    Conclusion: The results show that implementing eco-design in a company's product development can be hard in the implementation phase but when the practices are established the flow of information receives less problems. Furthermore, the hiring of professional eco-designers can be a good choice although they need to be implemented directly into the design teams.

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  • 12.
    Ghosal, Vivek
    et al.
    Department of Economics, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, New York, USA.
    Stephan, Andreas
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre for Family Entrepreneurship and Ownership (CeFEO).
    Weiss, Jan F.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management.
    Decentralized environmental regulations and plant-level productivity2019In: Business Strategy and the Environment, ISSN 0964-4733, E-ISSN 1099-0836, Vol. 28, no 6, p. 998-1011Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Using the framework provided by the Porter hypothesis, we study the impact of environmental regulations and enforcement policies on plant-level green total factor productivity (TFP) growth and its components related to efficiency change and technical change. The detailed microdata we use are from Sweden and for the pulp and paper industry. This industry is the source of significant amounts of water and air pollution and is one of the most heavily environmentally regulated manufacturing industries. Sweden has a unique decentralized regulatory structure where the manufacturing plants have to comply with plant-specific regulatory standards stipulated at the national level, as well as decentralized local supervision and enforcement. Our empirical results point to beneficial impacts of the environmental policies on plants' green TFP growth and sustainable production practices. We also find that political economy considerations are important, as the presence of the Green Party and aspects like plant size (with corresponding local and regional economic effects) matter in enforcement of the standards.

  • 13.
    Greku, Evgjenia
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics.
    Xie, Zhuohan
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics.
    The Relationship of Weather with Electricity Prices: A Case Study of Albania2020Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Electricity markets may become more sensitive to weather conditions because of higher penetration of renewable energy sources and climatic changes. Albania is 100% reliant on hydropower for its domestic energy generation, making this country compelling to investigate as it is highly sensitive to changing weather conditions. We use an ARMA-GARCH model to investigate whether weather and economic factors had a relationship with monthly hydroelectricity prices in the Albanian Energy Market in the period 2013-2018. We find that electricity price is affected by variations in weather and is not utterly robust to extreme hydrological changes. Generally, our dependent variable appears to be particularly influenced by air pressure followed by temperature and rainfall. We also perceive that there is a relationship between economic factors and hydroelectricity prices, where residual supply appears to have a significant negative relationship with our dependent variable. However, we were originally anticipating a higher dependency of electricity prices on weather conditions, due to the inflated hydro-power reliance for electricity production in the Albanian Energy Market. This effect is offset by several factors, where the state monopolized behaviour of the energy sector occupies a predominant influence on our results.

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    The Relationship of Weather with Electricity Prices: A Case Study of Albania
  • 14.
    Gümüş, Burcu
    et al.
    Istanbul Bilgi University, Turkey.
    Varnalı, Kaan
    Istanbul Bilgi University, Turkey.
    Özturkcan, Selcen
    Istanbul Bilgi University, Turkey.
    Adoption of Really New Products: Retro Appearance and the Bandwagon Effect2014In: Marketing theory challenges in emerging markets / [ed] Maja Szymura-Tyc, 2014, p. 23-Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The literature has paid far too little attention to the potential impact of retro appearance and bandwagon effect on the adoption of really new products. By integrating the retro appearance and bandwagon perspectives, we aim to contribute to the understanding of adoption of really new products. We purport that retro appearance and peer effect – familiar product appearances and observing peer usage – may attenuate the negative prejudgments towards really new products associated with perceived risks and facilitate adoption.

  • 15.
    Haglund, Sandra
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design.
    Lager, Amanda
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design.
    Implementering av sorteringsstation: Hantering för återanvändning av spillmaterial2021Independent thesis Basic level (university diploma), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of the study was to implement a sorting station for the carpentry company Sibab Interior AB, located in Blikstorp in Hjo municipality. Sibab manufactures furniture for the hotel industry, including the hotel chain Scandic. Today, the company burns all waste material to heat the company's premises without regard to further areas of use. The company wanted to implement sustainable production, and at the start of the project wanted to reuse residual material of wooden boards for future needs, such as further sales or incineration. The project was carried out with regard to the Swedish Work Environment Authority, the government and the UN as a basis for the study, followed by interviews and requests from the company's employees. Sibab showed clear wishes of the sorting station, the information collection has has therefore been the basis for concept generation and results. The sorting station was placed in a storage tent outside the factory, the scaffolding for the residual material has storage shelves that are used for placing the materials chipboard, MDF as well as other materials that can be used in production. For administrative knowledge of the number and properties of the residual materials, document management was created in the form of sheets of paper to enable structured stock status for waste material. After completing the project, Sibab Interior AB has decided to implement the created sorting station for waste materials. When implemented the sorting station, the company fulfils the request to work for a better tomorrow and create further handling for residual materials.

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  • 16.
    Høgevold, Nils M.
    et al.
    Department of Marketing, Kristiania University College, Oslo, Norway.
    Svensson, Göran
    Kristiania University College, Oslo, Norway.
    Rodriguez, Rocío
    Kristiania University College, Oslo, Norway.
    Eriksson, David
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management.
    Relative importance and priority of TBL elements on the corporate performance2019In: Management of environmental quality, ISSN 1477-7835, E-ISSN 1758-6119, Vol. 30, no 3, p. 609-623Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to examine to what extent that a selection of economic, social and environmental factors is taken into corporate consideration (importance and priority) the longitudinal aspects of sustainable business practices.

    Design/methodology/approach: This study is based on an inductive approach taking into account the longitudinal aspects and an in-depth case study of a Scandinavian manufacturer recognized for its initiatives and achievements of sustainable business practices.

    Findings: The key informants indicated that economic factors are always important when it comes to sustainable business practices, social factors are to some extent important, and the environmental factors are generally important.

    Research limitations/implications: The planning, implementation and follow-up of sustainable business practices and related efforts require a consideration of economic, social and environmental factors.

    Practical implications: The framework of a triple bottom line (TBL) dominant logic for business sustainability applied may guide the corporate assessment to plan, implement and follow-up the importance and priority of the longitudinal aspects of sustainable business practices.

    Originality/value: A TBL dominant logic for sustainable business practices adequately frames corporate efforts regarding importance and priority making a relevant contribution addressing the longitudinal aspects to complement existing theory and previous studies. 

  • 17.
    Karlsson, Daniel
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management.
    Sjögren, Eric
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management.
    Miljöfokuserade start-ups: En empirisk undersökning om nystartade företags förutsättningar att minska sin miljöpåverkan2017Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to examine what possibilities start-up companies have to work in an environmentally sustainable way, and what barriers they face in that context. The study moreover presents enabling factors which help start-ups realize opportunities and overcome barriers. To fulfill the purpose, it has been divided into two research questions, which follows:

    What opportunities and barriers do start-up companies, who want to work in an environmentally sustainable way, face?

    Which enablers can an environmentally sustainable start-up companies make use of to seize opportunities and lower barriers?

    Method: To fulfill the purpose a single case study was conducted. Empirical data was collected from a case company by semi structured interviews based on the theoretical framework. The selected case company is a start up with high focus on sustainability and the environment. A business incubator was also interviewed using semi structured questions to complement the empirical data collected from the case company. This empirical data was then analyzed against the theoretical framework which then lead to the study’s results.

    Findings: The study identified three major opportunities which help start-ups in an environmentally sustainable way: an increase in demand for environmentally products; tightened environmental regulations, and increased credibility from stakeholders. Moreover, four major barriers to environmental sustainability in start-ups were found: a low degree of market maturity; lack of financial resources and human capital; competition from established firms; and difficulties in attracting investors. In terms of enablers, the following factors were deemed instrumental in seizing opportunities and overcoming barriers: start-ups’ organizational flexibility, which allows them to rather quickly master necessary organizational change processes towards environmental sustainability; usage of environmental principles; social capital; and incubators as well as other external guidance.

    Implications: Presented opportunities, barriers and enablers are based on previous studies, the result of this study increase the understanding about how start-ups can work more environmentally focused. The empirical findings about incubators role in helping start-ups becoming more environmentally focused is an unexplored area and needs more attention in the literature. Societies can benefit from this increased understanding since it can lead to a decreased environmental impact, both on a local level by consuming less resources and a global level by slowing down the climate threat.

    Limitations: By including only one case company and one incubator combined with the qualitative research approach, the study covers a wide but shallow area. By including multiple case companies and incubators the study would have reached a higher level of generalization. Documents could have been studied in order to reach a more quantitative result with could have increased the credibility of the study. 

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  • 18.
    Khezri, Mohsen
    et al.
    Univ Kurdistan Hewler, Sch Management & Econ, Dept Business & Management, 30 Meter Ave, Erbil, Kurdistan Regio, Iraq..
    Mamghaderi, Mahnaz
    Iran Univ Sci & Technol, Student Ind Engn, Tehran, Iran..
    Razzaghi, Somayeh
    Bu Ali Sina Univ, Fac Econ & Social Sci, Hamadan, Hamadan, Iran..
    Heshmati, Almas
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre for Entrepreneurship and Spatial Economics (CEnSE).
    Comprehensive Environmental Assessment Index of Ecological Footprint2023In: Environmental Management, ISSN 0364-152X, E-ISSN 1432-1009, Vol. 71, p. 465-482Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper aims to contribute to the growing body of research literature on assessing environmental efficiency by introducing a new key performance indicator (KPIs) in more complete and dependable aspects of ecological footprint indices. For this purpose, the DEA model considering three inputs (energy consumption, labor force, and capital stock), one desirable output (GDP), and different undesirable outputs (CO2 emissions, ecological footprint indicators) are applied to 27 OECD countries from 2000 to 2017. According to the results, Norway, Luxemburg, and United Kingdom are the most environmentally efficient countries in terms of environmental efficiency and ecological footprint efficiency. On the other hand, the lowest environmental and ecological footprint efficiencies were in countries like Lithuania, Slovak, Czech, Estonia, and the USA. In addition, these nations fare poorly regarding their carbon footprint and farmland efficiency. In further detail, Lithuania, South Korea, Portugal, and Spain have a critical status in fishing ground efficiency, while the forest area efficiency is very acute in Estonia, Latvia, Lithuania, and Czech.

  • 19.
    Komatsu, Kimberly J.
    et al.
    Smithsonian Environmental Research Center, Edgewater, MD, United States.
    Avolio, Meghan L.
    Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD, United States.
    Lemoine, Nathan P.
    Department of Biological Sciences, Marquette University, Milwaukee, WI, United States.
    Isbell, Forest
    Department of Ecology, Evolution and Behavior, University of Minnesota, Saint Paul, MN, United States.
    Grman, Emily
    Department of Biology, Eastern Michigan University, Ypsilanti, MI 48197, United States.
    Houseman, Gregory R.
    Department of Biological Sciences, Wichita State University, Wichita, KS, United States.
    Koerner, Sally E.
    Department of Biology, University of North Carolina, Greensboro, NC, United States.
    Johnson, David S.
    Department of Biological Sciences, Virginia Institute of Marine Science, William and Mary, Gloucester Point, VA, United States.
    Wilcox, Kevin R.
    Department of Ecosystem Science and Management, University of Wyoming, Laramie, WY, United States.
    Alatalo, Juha M.
    Department of Biological and Environmental Sciences, College of Arts and Sciences, Qatar University, Doha, Qatar.
    Anderson, John P.
    Jornada Basin Long-Term Ecological Research Station, New Mexico State University, Las Cruces, NM, United States.
    Aerts, Rien
    Systems Ecology, Department of Ecological Science, Vrije Universiteit, Amsterdam, Netherlands.
    Baer, Sara G.
    Department of Plant Biology, Southern Illinois University, Carbondale, IL, United States.
    Baldwin, Andrew H.
    Department of Environmental Science and Technology, University of Maryland, MD, United States.
    Bates, Jonathan
    Eastern Oregon Agricultural Research Center-Burns, Agriculture Research Service, US Department of Agriculture, Burns, OR, United States.
    Beierkuhnlein, Carl
    Department of Biogeography, University of Bayreuth, Bayreuth, Germany.
    Belote, R. Travis
    Wilderness Society, Bozeman, MT, United States.
    Blair, John
    Division of Biology, Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS, United States.
    Bloor, Juliette M. G.
    Université Clermont Auvergne, Institut National de la Recherche Agronomique, VetAgro-Sup, Unité Mixte de Recherche sur l'Écosystème Prairial, Clermont-Ferrand, France.
    Bohlen, Patrick J.
    Bork, Edward W.
    Boughton, Elizabeth H.
    Bowman, William D.
    Britton, Andrea J.
    Cahill, James F.
    Chaneton, Enrique
    Chiariello, Nona R.
    Cheng, Jimin
    Collins, Scott L.
    Cornelissen, J. Hans C.
    Du, Guozhen
    Eskelinen, Anu
    Firn, Jennifer
    Foster, Bryan
    Gough, Laura
    Gross, Katherine
    Hallett, Lauren M.
    Han, Xingguo
    Harmens, Harry
    Hovenden, Mark J.
    Jägerbrand, Annika K.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Civil Engineeering and Lighting Science.
    Jentsch, Anke
    Kern, Christel
    Klanderud, Kari
    Knapp, Alan K.
    Kreyling, Juergen
    Li, Wei
    Luo, Yiqi
    McCulley, Rebecca L.
    McLaren, Jennie R.
    Megonigal, J. Patrick
    Morgan, John W.
    Onipchenko, Vladimir
    Pennings, Steven C.
    Prevéy, Janet S.
    Price, Jodi N.
    Reich, Peter B.
    Robinson, Clare H.
    Russell, F. Leland
    Sala, Osvaldo E.
    Seabloom, Eric W.
    Smith, Melinda D.
    Soudzilovskaia, Nadejda A.
    Souza, Lara
    Suding, Katherine
    Suttle, K. Blake
    Svejcar, Tony
    Tilman, David
    Tognetti, Pedro
    Turkington, Roy
    White, Shannon
    Xu, Zhuwen
    Yahdjian, Laura
    Yu, Qiang
    Zhang, Pengfei
    Zhang, Yunhai
    Global change effects on plant communities are magnified by time and the number of global change factors imposed2019In: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, ISSN 0027-8424, E-ISSN 1091-6490, Vol. 116, no 36, p. 17867-17873Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Accurate prediction of community responses to global change drivers (GCDs) is critical given the effects of biodiversity on ecosystem services. There is consensus that human activities are driving species extinctions at the global scale, but debate remains over whether GCDs are systematically altering local communities worldwide. Across 105 experiments that included over 400 experimental manipulations, we found evidence for a lagged response of herbaceous plant communities to GCDs caused by shifts in the identities and relative abundances of species, often without a corresponding difference in species richness. These results provide evidence that community responses are pervasive across a wide variety of GCDs on long-term temporal scales and that these responses increase in strength when multiple GCDs are simultaneously imposed.Global change drivers (GCDs) are expected to alter community structure and consequently, the services that ecosystems provide. Yet, few experimental investigations have examined effects of GCDs on plant community structure across multiple ecosystem types, and those that do exist present conflicting patterns. In an unprecedented global synthesis of over 100 experiments that manipulated factors linked to GCDs, we show that herbaceous plant community responses depend on experimental manipulation length and number of factors manipulated. We found that plant communities are fairly resistant to experimentally manipulated GCDs in the short term (<10 y). In contrast, long-term (≥10 y) experiments show increasing community divergence of treatments from control conditions. Surprisingly, these community responses occurred with similar frequency across the GCD types manipulated in our database. However, community responses were more common when 3 or more GCDs were simultaneously manipulated, suggesting the emergence of additive or synergistic effects of multiple drivers, particularly over long time periods. In half of the cases, GCD manipulations caused a difference in community composition without a corresponding species richness difference, indicating that species reordering or replacement is an important mechanism of community responses to GCDs and should be given greater consideration when examining consequences of GCDs for the biodiversity–ecosystem function relationship. Human activities are currently driving unparalleled global changes worldwide. Our analyses provide the most comprehensive evidence to date that these human activities may have widespread impacts on plant community composition globally, which will increase in frequency over time and be greater in areas where communities face multiple GCDs simultaneously.

  • 20.
    Kotilainen, Kirsi
    et al.
    Faculty of Business and Built Environment, Tampere University of Technology, Tampere, Finland.
    Saari, Ulla A.
    Faculty of Business and Built Environment, Tampere University of Technology, Tampere, Finland.
    Policy influence on consumers' evolution into prosumers-empirical findings from an exploratory survey in Europe2018In: Sustainability, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 10, no 1, article id 186Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The energy sector is in transition to a flexible and sustainable energy system based on renewable energy sources. This complex transition is affecting multiple levels in the sociotechnical system. One driver of the transition is climate change that enforces the policy push from the macro level to change the way energy is produced, delivered, and used. As part of the energy system evolution, the role of the end user in the energy sector is undergoing profound changes, and consumers are increasingly being empowered to participate actively in the production and use of energy. This article investigates how policies might affect consumers' interests in becoming prosumers of energy. We explore consumers' attitudes toward using renewable energy technologies (RET) by means of an empirical consumer survey that was conducted in five European countries. The partial least squares structural equation modeling (PLS-SEM) method was utilized to analyze the survey results. Our findings suggest that both economic and non-economic policies affect consumer attitudes toward using renewable energy technologies. We conclude that policies have different effects on consumers and prosumers, who have already made the decision to adopt renewable energy solutions. Based on the findings, we propose a set of policy and managerial implications. 

  • 21.
    Kotilainen, Kirsi
    et al.
    Industrial Engineering and Management, Faculty of Management and Business, Tampere University, Tampere, Finland.
    Saari, Ulla A.
    Industrial Engineering and Management, Faculty of Management and Business, Tampere University, Tampere, Finland.
    Mäkinen, Saku J.
    Industrial Engineering and Management, Faculty of Management and Business, Tampere University, Tampere, Finland.
    Ringle, Christian M.
    Institute of Human Resource Management and Organizations, Hamburg University of Technology, Hamburg, Germany.
    Exploring the microfoundations of end-user interests toward co-creating renewable energy technology innovations2019In: Journal of Cleaner Production, ISSN 0959-6526, E-ISSN 1879-1786, Vol. 229, p. 203-212Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Energy market transition, which is enabled by new affordable energy technologies and digitalization, opens novel opportunities for developing innovative energy solutions. These new technologies facilitate energy consumers to become local energy prosumers i.e. consumers and producers of energy using renewable energy sources. Hence, a central question for innovating new solutions emerges: how energy consumers and prosumers would engage in co-creating value and novel solutions with industry players? This article explores the microfoundations of energy consumers' and prosumers’ interest to participate in co-creation activities with energy industry actors. Using survey data from five European countries and by applying variance-based structural equation modeling, we find that rewards and personal characteristics influence the interest to engage in co-creation activities. Specifically, the microfoundations of the interest are built upon the need for improvements, the intrinsic rewards, and the personal adopter characteristics. Additionally, we find differing microfoundations of interest for energy consumers and prosumers. We further discuss managerial and theoretical implications of our findings and highlight avenues for future research. 

  • 22.
    Leal Filho, Walter
    et al.
    Research and Transfer Centre “Sustainable Development and Climate Change Management”, Hamburg University of Applied Sciences, Ulmenliet, Germany.
    Saari, Ulla A.
    Center for Innovation and Technology Research, Laboratory of Industrial and Information Management, Tampere University of Technology, Tampere, Finland.
    Fedoruk, Mariia
    Department of Ecological Economics, Institute for Ecological Economics and Management, Ukrainian National Forestry University, Ivano-Frankivsk, Lviv, Ukraine.
    Iital, Arvo
    Water and Environmental Engineering Research Group, Tallinn University of Technology, Tallinn, Estonia.
    Moora, Harri
    Stockholm Environment Institute Tallinn Centre, Tallinn, Estonia.
    Klöga, Marija
    Water and Environmental Engineering Research Group, Tallinn University of Technology, Tallinn, Estonia.
    Voronova, Viktoria
    Water and Environmental Engineering Research Group, Tallinn University of Technology, Tallinn, Estonia.
    An overview of the problems posed by plastic products and the role of extended producer responsibility in Europe2019In: Journal of Cleaner Production, ISSN 0959-6526, E-ISSN 1879-1786, Vol. 214, p. 550-558Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Plastic products are easy and convenient for our everyday use, but their negative impacts on human health and the environment cannot be overlooked. The negative impacts and effects of plastic waste are now widely known and have been subject of much recent media coverage, both in Europe and on a global level. Faced with increasing amounts of plastic waste, the European Union as a whole and many European governments in particular, are currently revising the policy options available to cope with the problem. One of the tools which may be deployed with a view to reducing the pressures posed by plastic waste, is the Extended Producer Responsibility principle. It is considered to be one of the major waste management policy instruments that support the implementation of the European waste hierarchy. Its application may assist in fostering the collection and recycling of waste streams that contain plastic. This paper presents an overview of the problems posed by plastic waste, and outlines their environmental dimensions. It discusses the role of the Extended Producer Responsibility principle and provides some recommendations that may be useful in enhancing extended producer responsibility.

  • 23.
    Mobli, Nasim
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School.
    Ramlubhai Pillamari, Prasad
    Emotional Intelligence in the Workplace: A study on Emotional Intelligence in Workers’ Occupational Health, Safety and Environment (HSE) in the workplace2020Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Work-related accidents emerge from potential hazards that can cause different negative outcomes in different situations. Human errors are specific actions that can either directly (active errors) or indirectly (latent errors) cause an accident in the workplace. Nowadays in order to establish an applicable system in the way of maintenance and preferment of a work environment without any accidents that are trying to develop the HSE system. In fact, this management system has been using as a significant tool to control and improve the performance of health and safety and the environment in all development programs of industries and organizations. In this term, one of the important perspectives of HSE management is Emotional Intelligence which deals with the management’s ability and safety performance in the workplace.

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the relationship between Emotional Intelligence and Occupational Health, Safety and Environment (HSE) management in the workplace, to reduce industrial incidents of human factors. Therefore, there is a requirement for a better understanding of how Emotional Intelligence factors influence health and safety performance in the workplace.

    A qualitative study has been done to achieve this purpose. In this case, data has been collected through eight semi-structured interviews with HSE managers and officers that participated from different industries around the world.  The main focus of this collection data was extracting the perspectives of the individual’s views. Afterward, to create a theory, the data has been analyzed according to different steps for a grounded analysis regarding discovering how the Emotional Intelligence factors of employees impact their health and safety performance in the workplace.

     

    The results of this study have shown that there are mainly two areas to study which are key roles of Emotional Intelligence in safety performance and key roles for effective Healthy, Safety, and Environment management. It has shown that the key roles of Emotional Intelligence in safety performance is being able to manage your own and being able to deal with other’s emotions. Besides, key roles for effective Healthy, Safety, and Environment management only three factors have been important to improve the safety act which is being able to make the correct decision in the emergency situation’ and ability to prevent incidents at the workplace as well as the level of perception of risk. These results demonstrated that strong factors of Emotional Intelligence are vital to improve the health and safety performance at the workplace and the improvement of these abilities should be approached for the workplace.

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  • 24.
    Mäkinen, Saku J.
    et al.
    Laboratory of Industrial and Information Management, Tampere University of Technology, Tampere, Finland.
    Valta, Jussi
    Laboratory of Industrial and Information Management, Tampere University of Technology, Tampere, Finland.
    Kotilainen, Kirsi
    Laboratory of Industrial and Information Management, Tampere University of Technology, Tampere, Finland.
    Saari, Ulla A.
    Laboratory of Industrial and Information Management, Tampere University of Technology, Tampere, Finland.
    Prosumers’ digital business models for electric vehicles: Exploring microfoundations for a balanced policy approach2019In: Digital business models: Driving transformation and innovation / [ed] A. Aagaard, Cham: Palgrave Macmillan, 2019, p. 227-254Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Mäkinen et al. provide an indispensable view of business model opportunities for electric vehicle (EV) prosumers in the future energy market. The digitalization of energy markets has started a transformation to smart grids where information flows bi-directionally end to end between energy production and consumption. The chapter explores how prosumers can create, deliver, and capture value with EVs in future energy systems. Focusing on prosumers’ digital business models (DBMs), the chapter illustrates the complex interdependencies between various activities and actors needed in the development of an energy system. In addition to demonstrating prosumers’ EV DBMs and the current state of readiness in value creation, delivery, and capture, Mäkinen et al. develop a balanced policy approach that is based on these DBM microfoundations.

  • 25.
    Nilsson Persson, Robyn
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    Falk, Tindra
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    The Value Of Environmental Sustainability: A Shared Responsibility: An exploration of B2B companies in Sweden and their costs and benefits of selecting sustainable business partners, using ISO 14001 as a point of reference.2022Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The business-to-business (B2B) industry stands for a significant portion of the environmental issue, yet the customer is still having price, quality, and service as major determinants for the choice of suppliers. The difficulty on how to evaluate environmental factors is hence increasingly demanding. One common and simple way for businesses to present their efforts towards sustainability is to certify their Environmental Management System with an ISO 14001 certification. Nonetheless, the question remains of the value of this premise in Sweden in our contemporary world. This study thereby investigates the value of working with environmentally sustainable business partners in the B2B market in Sweden.

    Purpose: This paper aims to explore the cost and benefits of working with environmentally sustainable business partners, using ISO 14001 as a reference point, within the Swedish B2B market. 

    Method: This study adheres to the interpretivist paradigm, with a qualitative approach. Nine semi-structured interviews with six B2B companies in Sweden were conducted and analysed via thematic analysis, using codes and emerging themes. 

    Conclusion: There are severe gaps in the ISO 14001 framework, and that one cannot trust it as much regarding the environment as intended or as much as firms do today. The real value for environmental sustainability is created when sustainable B2B firms start selecting suppliers based on their own sustainable values, not on time efficiency or costs. For a shared responsibility, firms have to evaluate suppliers based on actual and not perceived environmentally sustainable efforts. 

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  • 26.
    Oftedal, Elin Merethe
    et al.
    School of Business and Economics, UiT–The Arctic University of Norway, Tromsø, Norway.
    Foss, Lene
    School of Business and Economics, UiT–The Arctic University of Norway, Tromsø, Norway.
    Iakovleva, Tatiana
    Stavanger Business School, University of Stavanger, Stavanger, Norway.
    Responsible for responsibility? A study of digital e-health startups2019In: Sustainability, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 11, no 19, article id 5433Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Responsible innovation (RI) has received increased attention from policymakers and academics as a solution to grand challenges and is viewed as the main driver for innovation. The United Nations has suggested 17 Sustainable Development Goals and responsible innovation can be seen as a tool that allows the movement of society towards reducing inequality, coping with environmental challenges and sustaining countries&rsquo; economic and societal development. Our knowledge of how businesses act responsibly in solving these challenges is scarce. An inductive analysis of 14 e-health startups in Norway, shows that responsibility is highly prevalent. Entrepreneurs have instant contact with users (patients or healthcare professionals), which increases inclusiveness, anticipation and reflection as the main elements of responsibility. However, firms' contextual and strategic awareness of responsibility remains low, which means an absence of focused strategies to exercise responsibility. Consequently, entrepreneurial startups are prevented from reaching broader stakeholders and fully reflecting the knowledge obtained. Moreover, RI activities are often bundled with other activities on the "path" to successful commercialization. This paper contributes to and enriches the current RI understanding from a firm perspective and suggests some implications for practitioners as well as policymakers to enhance sustainable development in the healthcare sector.

  • 27.
    Perez Sanchez, Alberto
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School. peal21uu@student.ju.se.
    Trebicka, Zofia
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School.
    Sustainable Supply Chain Management (SSCM) Governance Mechanisms and Configurations applied in Swedish companies2022Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Background: There are several strategies that focal companies can opt for to manage their supplychain. Different combinations of configurations and governance mechanisms are argued to havedifferent sustainability outcomes. First, main firms need to decide if they manage the relationshipwith suppliers themselves or if they hire a third party. Second, the buying companies could leadthe relationship with providers by incorporating collaboration or relying on industry certificates.Besides, Swedish companies, as well as Swedish citizens, are claimed to be highly sustainable.Purpose: The goal of this project is to discover the strategies top Swedish companies implementin their supply chains regarding sustainability, and their influence on the position of the companyin the Sustainable Brand Index. As a result, this project will help to determine which specificactions are most likely to lead to increased supply chain sustainability.Method: To fulfil the research purpose, a qualitative study has been conducted. Seven case studies,consisting of five semi-structured interviews with employees from Swedish companies, and twoperipherical secondary-data based ones, were coded and analysed using the grounded analysisfollowing an abductive approach.Conclusion: The results show that the configuration framework available in the literature is notas accurate as it could be, therefore, a new one is proposed. The combination that appeared to havethe best sustainability outcomes entailed a partially closed configuration i.e., extending monitoringto lower tiers, and a spectrum in the governance mechanisms gathering focal company owninitiatives and certifications.

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  • 28.
    Rashidi, Kamran
    et al.
    Department of Business Development and Technology, Aarhus University, Denmark; Department of Business Administration, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Noorizadeh, Abdollah
    Department of Civil Engineering, Aalto University School of Engineering, Espoo, Finland.
    Kannan, Devika
    Center for Sustainable Supply Chain Engineering, Department of Technology and Innovation, University of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark.
    Cullinane, Kevin
    Department of Business Administration, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Applying the triple bottom line in sustainable supplier selection: A meta-review of the state-of-the-art2020In: Journal of Cleaner Production, ISSN 0959-6526, E-ISSN 1879-1786, Vol. 269, article id 122001Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study conducts a systematic meta-literature review in the field of sustainable supplier selection. The number of published papers within the domain of sustainable supplier selection has grown considerably in recent years. Up until now, there has been no attempt quantitatively analyze the content of these published papers using bibliometric and network analysis software. Thus, this paper utilizes Gephi and Bibexcel software to conduct a quantitative review. In total, 4,882 documents were reviewed based on 336 combinations searched in Scopus and the Web of Science from 1990 to March 2018. Bibliometric, co-word and co-citation analysis are applied to quantitatively extract and analyze the content of these papers. The analysis reveals that: 1) There is a gap between industry and academia that needs to be bridged; 2) More studies in the area of global sourcing are needed; 3) Comparing the outcomes of different supplier evaluation methods is required; 4) There has been no major shift or change in the traditional supplier selection practices; 5) The ratio of the applied social criteria is relatively low compared to the total number of criteria; 6) The innovation capability of suppliers needs to be further considered; 7) More studies of sustainable supplier selection are needed in the e-procurement arena, as well as service-based industries such as healthcare, and 8) Evaluating the sustainability of suppliers in a dynamic environment needs to be further studied. The conclusion also reveals that only a limited number of journals exhibit a specific focus on the sustainable supplier selection arena; analytical and mathematical-based methods are the most applied supplier selection tools and there is a misalignment between the applied criteria in the triple bottom line. 

  • 29.
    Ring, Linnea
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management.
    Hogander, Adam
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management.
    Miljöstyrning av leverantörskedjor: En fallstudie på en global leverantörskedja inom tillverkningsindustrin2023Independent thesis Basic level (university diploma), 180 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to investigate how environmental management can be designed by manufacturing companies in their global supply chains. To fulfill the purpose, two issues were raised:

    [1] How is environmental management used in global supply chains within the manufacturing industry?

    [2] What factors should be considered when designing environmental management in global supply chains in the manufacturing industry?

    Method – The study is a case study and consists of qualitative data collection in the form of interviews and document studies. The use of several data collection methods contributes to an increased validity of collected data. The results of the collected data were then compared with theories in the field to enable answers to the questions and a fulfillment of the purpose.

    Findings – Environmental management can be used in several different ways to influence the supplier. It is common for companies to prohibit the use of certain materials or substances in their products throughout the supply chain. On the other hand, it was proven more difficult for companies to influence their suppliers' relationship to environmental aspects. Environmental governance can be used to help suppliers get started with sustainability work through close collaboration. Environmental governance can also be used to guide suppliers to choose more emission-friendly production methods, use more sustainable materials or increase the importance of sustainability work throughout the supply chain.

    Implications – The study has focused on how companies can use environmental management in their work for sustainability through their supply chains. The results of the study have highlighted aspects that should be considered by companies when using environmental management of global supply chains. The study also reveals differences around the world that can affect environmental management. The results can be used as guidance and support for companies that work or want to work with environmental management through their global supply chains.

    Limitations – The study is based on one case, which may impair generalizability. The experience gathered comes from the case company and their suppliers, which limits the application to other companies or operations. Collected data comes from a few suppliers, which limits the breadth of the study and may affect applicability. By comparing the case study with previous theories, a single case study is still representative.

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    Miljöstyrning av leverantörskedjor
  • 30.
    Robertson, Kerstin
    et al.
    Statens väg- och transportforskningsinstitut, Miljö.
    Jägerbrand, Annika K.
    Statens väg- och transportforskningsinstitut, Miljö.
    Eriksson, Jan R.
    Swedish National Road and Transport Research Institute, Linköping, Sweden.
    Regional Transport Indicators Used in Sweden for Measurement, Reporting and Verification of CO2 Emissions2015In: Challenges, ISSN 2078-1547, E-ISSN 2078-1547, Vol. 6, no 1, p. 55-70Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Established practice is available as a reference for evaluating sustainable transport and CO2 emissions at national, European and global levels, but comparing corresponding systems at the regional and local levels are more challenging. Therefore, this paper analyses the use of indicators, evaluation methods and data availability at local and regional levels for applied policies and measures in transport planning. Sweden is used as a case study. Available data show that total surveys (e.g., vehicle registry data), sample surveys (e.g., interviews) or modelling can be used to develop transport indicators, and that either generated (volume generated in the area) or performed (volume in the area) traffic and transportation is estimated. However, there are limitations with all methods and the design of evaluations needs careful consideration in order to reflect changes in local and regional transport systems and to relate those changes to specific measures and policies. In most cases, survey methods need to be used in order to follow up the most common indicators. All evaluation methods need to be complemented with analyses of a baseline to determine additionality and also potential rebound effects need to be considered, which requires the application of a wider systems perspective.

  • 31.
    Rodriguez, Rocio
    et al.
    Marketing and Market Research Department, Faculty of Economic and Business, Campus de Espinardo, Murcia University, Murcia, Spain; School of Communication, Leadership and Marketing, Kristiania University College, Oslo, Norway.
    Svensson, Göran
    School of Communication, Leadership and Marketing, Kristiania University College, Oslo, Norway.
    Eriksson, David
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management.
    Priorities determining future directions of sustainable development in business models of the healthcare industry—findings and framework2021In: Sustainability, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 13, no 11, article id 6507Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The private healthcare sector was chosen because of the fundamental importance of quality in this sector, the widespread understanding that sustainable development is part of hospital quality standards, and the compelling need for the supply chain components to work together in order to add value to the business models of private healthcare services. This study uses a qualitative methodology, striving to add value to and shed light on the relationship between private hospital communication modes and their stakeholders’ needs and their stakeholders’ expectations of business models in the marketplace and society. This research lists a range of actions and services for assessing the priorities of private hospital communication modes in business models with respect to stakeholder needs and expectations. Furthermore, the study links stakeholder needs and theexpectations of business models in private hospitals, with respect to private hospital communication modes with stakeholders, and vice versa. It also provides directions for managers in the healthcare industry to determine the appropriate actions and services for addressing stakeholders’ needs and stakeholders’ expectations of business models in private hospitals considering sustainable development. This research contributes to framing the future direction of sustainable development in business models of the healthcare industry. The paper outlines the assessment of communication modes in relation to economic, social, and environmental performance in the context of sustainable development. 

  • 32.
    Saari, Ulla A.
    Tampere University of Technology, Tampere, Finland.
    Eco-friendliness in the brand experience of high-tech products2016Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The focus in this research is to develop a brand measurement scale for measuring how consumers experience eco-friendliness when reflecting on global high-tech brands. The aim is to examine can the eco-friendliness dimension in the brand experience of a high- tech brand be measured with a brand experience measurement scale by extending the research of Brakus et al. (2009). This research topic was selected because also high-tech companies are facing the need to analyze how consumers view the eco-friendliness of their brands in order to create greener products that could also benefit the financial performance of the company (Siegel, 2009). Eco-friendliness can be seen as an important factor for consumers when they are purchasing e.g. fast-moving consumer goods (McDonald et al., 2009) and automobiles (Kim, 2011). However, it is not still considered to be so relevant when buying consumer electronics or high-tech products and this is an area that has not been researched as extensively (McDonald et al., 2009). This dissertation focuses on this research gap and investigates how eco-friendliness can be measured in the brand experience of high-tech products.

    The approach in this dissertation is empirical and the research has been conducted as a replication and extension of the existing brand experience measurement scale (BBX scale) developed earlier by Brakus et al. (2009). The BBX scale was developed further and extended with a fifth dimension for eco-friendliness to get a better understanding of the concept of eco-friendliness in the brand experience. In the design of the study, the eco-friendliness dimension was created on the basis of the attested dimensions in the BBX model, including affective, behavioral, intellectual and sensory dimensions. The theoretical background of this dissertation is based in management of high-tech innovations and especially consumer behavior and brand management research in this domain. The research includes empirical data collected in a web survey in Finland that was analyzed by using the original BBX model and two different models portraying extensions of the BBX model that also included items on eco-friendliness.

    The contribution of this study is that theoretically brand experience was proved to have also an eco-friendliness dimension in addition to the affective, behavioral, intellectual and sensory dimensions included in the original BBX scale. This study succeeded in modelling the general brand experience of mobile phones based on the original BBX model and it was also confirmed that eco-friendliness is an additional, uniquely identifiable fifth dimension in the brand experience of high-tech brands. The implication of this finding is that high-tech companies should also take into account eco-friendliness that has become increasingly important in the management of corporate value and brands in the global competition (Mohr et al., 2010, Keller, 2013) in order to respond to the needs of green consumers (Chatterjee et al., 2010, Aaker, 2011, Kotler, 2011, Ottman, 2011, Accenture and UN_Global_Compact, 2014).

  • 33.
    Saari, Ulla A.
    et al.
    Center for Innovation and Technology Research (CITER), Laboratory of Industrial and Information Management, Tampere University of Technology, Tampere, Finland.
    Aarikka-Stenroos, Leena
    Center for Innovation and Technology Research (CITER), Laboratory of Industrial and Information Management, Tampere University of Technology, Tampere, Finland.
    Köppä, Leena
    Innovation Services/Y-kampus, Tampere University of Technology, Tampere, Finland.
    Langwaldt, Jörg
    Research Services, Tampere University of Technology, Tampere, Finland.
    Boedeker, Stina
    Funding Services, University of Tampere, Tampere, Finland.
    Mäkinen, Saku J.
    Laboratory of Industrial and Information Management, Tampere University of Technology, Tampere, Finland.
    Sustainable business model ideation and development of early ideas for sustainable business models: Analyzing a new tool facilitating the ideation process2019In: Sustainable business models: Innovation, implementation and success / [ed] A. Aagaard, Cham: Palgrave Macmillan, 2019, p. 119-150Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This chapter presents an early ideation tool, the Impact Canvas® (IC), that has been specifically designed to involve different kinds of stakeholders in the early stages of the business and research ideation process. The authors discuss how a tool can support the ideation process and how the IC tool has been designed to incorporate different elements for the development of sustainable and impactful ideas. The usefulness of the tool when cooperating in a multidisciplinary team is described. The authors report feedback from users of the tool that supports the perception of the user-friendliness and usefulness of the tool. The chapter concludes with a description of how the IC tool is being further developed to support a more multidisciplinary approach to research and business ideation.

  • 34.
    Saari, Ulla A.
    et al.
    Center for Innovation and Technology Research, Department of Industrial and Information Management, Tampere University of Technology, Tampere, Finland.
    Baumgartner, Rupert J.
    Institute of Systems Sciences, Innovation and Sustainability Research, University of Graz, Graz, Austria.
    Mäkinen, Saku J.
    Center for Innovation and Technology Research, Department of Industrial and Information Management, Tampere University of Technology, Tampere, Finland.
    Eco-friendly brands to drive sustainable development: Replication and extension of the brand experience scale in a cross-national context2017In: Sustainability, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 9, no 7, article id 1286Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this study is to explore how consumers perceive eco-friendliness in their brand experiences and how this can be measured cross-nationally. This is a replication-extension study based on an existing brand experience scale. Data were collected in India and Finland from smartphone users (N = 1008). The fitness of the brand experience model is validated cross-nationally with structural equation modeling. The empirical data consisting of consumers' responses on the Apple, Samsung, and Nokia brands confirm that there is a unique dimension of eco-friendliness in the general brand experiences of consumers, and it is generalizable cross-nationally in India and Finland. The study presents a consumer-focused measure of sustainable development that could be used to track how consumers perceive the eco-friendliness of brands. The paper links consumer experiences that guide sustainable consumption behavior to the macro-level management of sustainable development. This paper extends previous research on brand experience measurement by testing cross-nationally a scale including a dimension for measuring eco-friendliness. The brand experience measurement scale could aid companies in tracking the success of their sustainable development initiatives on the brand level.

  • 35.
    Saari, Ulla A.
    et al.
    Department of Industrial and Information Management, Center for Innovation and Technology Research, Tampere University of Technology, Tampere, Finland.
    Fritz, Morgane M. C.
    Institute of Systems Sciences, Innovation and Sustainability Research, University of Graz, Graz, Austria.
    Mäkinen, Saku J.
    Department of Industrial and Information Management, Center for Innovation and Technology Research, Tampere University of Technology, Tampere, Finland.
    Baumgartner, Rupert J.
    Institute of Systems Sciences, Innovation and Sustainability Research, University of Graz, Graz, Austria.
    Designing green marketing across industries: A conceptual framework and implications for consumers and transdisciplinary research2018In: Handbook of sustainability science and research / [ed] Walter Leal Filho, Cham: Springer, 2018, p. 581-596Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Understanding what marketing messages trigger sustainable consumer behavior is one of the key issues for companies to be able to design effective green marketing. The goal of this paper is to present a conceptual framework for a green marketing approach that includes product, industry, production processes, and supply chain specific considerations to be utilized in the design of green product marketing for the mass markets. Based on a literature review, we have created a conceptual framework with industry-specific aspects on the basis of unique features in seven industrial sectors that are of relevance to the personal needs of consumers from an environmental perspective, but are focusing on the product-specific aspects of the marketed products. The originality of this study lies in the proposition that green marketing should use the actual product features as a starting point and not focus only on green consumers. The greenness of a product should be an additional dimension that adds to the competitiveness of the product when compared to conventional products. Theoretically, we propose that a transdisciplinary approach that integrates sustainable supply chain management perspectives to green marketing would benefit companies designing green marketing approaches and consumers making green product choices. 

  • 36.
    Saari, Ulla A.
    et al.
    Tampere University of Technology, Tampere, Finland.
    Mäkinen, Saku
    Tampere University of Technology, Tampere, Finland.
    Alinikula, Petteri
    Tampere University of Technology, Tampere, Finland.
    Consumers' views on eco-friendliness as a dimension of a high-tech brand2014In: Going Green - CARE INNOVATION 2014, 2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    High-tech companies are facing the need to perform deeper analysis of how consumers view the eco-friendliness of their brands, in order to create green product and marketing strategies. The focus of this paper is to study whether consumers associate eco-friendliness with high-tech brands, and what kinds of consumers are most pro-environmental based on demographics. The key finding of this research is that consumers consider also eco‐friendly aspects when reflecting on high‐tech brands on four dimensions also used to measure general brand experience: the sensory, affective, behavioral and intellectual dimensions. Demographically, women consider eco‐friendliness more in association with high‐tech brands than men across all of the four brand experience dimensions. In addition, mature consumers consider on the intellectual and sensory brand dimensions more eco‐friendly aspects than young consumers. There are no statistically significant differences in the responses based on the educational background of the respondents.

  • 37.
    Saari, Ulla A.
    et al.
    Tampere University of Technology, Tampere, Finland.
    Mäkinen, Saku J.
    Tampere University of Technology, Tampere, Finland.
    Exploring how brand experience measurement could be used for integrating marketing and R&D2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Based on a brand experience survey done on global mobile phone brands, we have analysed how brand experiences impact brand loyalty and are associated to prior product selections. We have created two conceptual models after doing exploratory factor analysis (EFA) on data collected from Finland (N=468). Our findings indicate that brand experiences of mobile phone brands consist of intellectual, sensory, behavioural, and eco-friendliness related aspects, and that the affective dimension that has earlier been linked to brand experiences is in fact associated more with brand loyalty. Also the perception of eco-friendliness in the brand experience can have an impact on brand loyalty and it is reflected in the product selection. Thus we suggest that integrated marketing and innovation management concentrate on improving the emotions consumers have towards a brand and measure this dimension to track how the brand has succeeded to deliver intellectual, sensory, behavioural and eco-friendliness related brand experiences.

  • 38. Saari, Ulla A.
    et al.
    Mäkinen, Saku J.
    From replication to further scale development: A case study of incorporating an eco-friendliness dimension in an existing consumer experience scale2019In: SAGE research methods cases: Part 2, London: Sage Publications, 2019Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This case study describes how we developed a new dimension for measuring eco-friendliness in an existing brand experience measurement scale. We also replicated the original scale to test its generalizability in other countries. Extensions and replications of existing frameworks are important for validating current theories and testing their reliability, even though these research approaches are not yet commonly applied in marketing and business research. In this case study, we describe the research stages that we went through when replicating and extending the scale in two different countries: a small Western country and a large non-Western country. This case study also briefly presents the statistical methods we used (e.g., principal components analysis, confirmatory factor analysis, and structural equation modeling). Replications and extensions of existing frameworks with new dimensions for sustainability-related constructs could aid the field of business and management to further develop more theories on advancing sustainable business.

  • 39.
    Saari, Ulla A.
    et al.
    Department of Industrial Management, Tampere University of Technology, Tampere, Finland.
    Mäkinen, Saku J.
    Department of Industrial Management, Tampere University of Technology, Tampere, Finland.
    Measuring brand experiences cross-nationally2017In: Journal of Brand Management, ISSN 1350-231X, E-ISSN 1479-1803, Vol. 24, no 1, p. 86-104Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The need for reliable and valid metrics for tracking consumers' experiences of products and brands cross-nationally is becoming ever more important as companies are increasingly operating in international markets. Brand experiences associated with global brands can manifest themselves very differently in different parts of the world; thus, the scales developed to track brand experiences should be validated cross-nationally. This research tests and revises an existing brand experience measurement scale cross-nationally in two countries that have very different cultural settings. Based on the findings from a survey with a sample of 1008 respondents, the authors propose a revised and shortened scale that provides more reliable and valid measurement results of brand experiences of global high-tech brands. In general, the results demonstrate the need for tests on the cross-national applicability of measurement scales and, even further, they underline the importance of replication research.

  • 40.
    Saari, Ulla A.
    et al.
    Tampere University of Technology, Tampere, Finland.
    Mäkinen, Saku J.
    Tampere University of Technology, Tampere, Finland.
    Baumgartner, Rupert J.
    Is eco-friendliness driving customer product choice in technology markets?2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The goal of this study is to examine how eco-friendliness in the brand experience impacts product selection, and how product selection induces green brand loyalty among customers and consumers. A conceptual model is tested with empirical data collected with a web survey on mobile phone brands. The findings of this research indicate that eco-friendliness in the brand experience influences positively product selection and green brand loyalty for some global brands. Thefindings also point out that technology firms should seriously consider their sustainability and eco-friendliness strategies in their technology commercialization activities.

  • 41.
    Saari, Ulla A.
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Tampere University, Industrial Engineering & Management, Faculty of Management and Business, Tampere, Finland.
    Mäkinen, Saku J.
    Tampere University, Industrial Engineering & Management, Faculty of Management and Business, Tampere, Finland.
    Baumgartner, Rupert J.
    Institute of Systems Sciences, Innovation and Sustainability Research, University of Graz, Graz, Austria.
    Hillebrand, Bas
    Institute for Management Research, Radboud University, Nijmegen, The Netherlands .
    Driessen, Paul H.
    Institute for Management Research, Radboud University, Nijmegen, The Netherlands .
    How consumers’ respect for nature and environmental self-assets influence their car brand experiences2020In: Journal of Cleaner Production, ISSN 0959-6526, E-ISSN 1879-1786, Vol. 261, article id 121023Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper provides a novel perspective on sustainability research by exploring how two pro-environmental characteristics of consumers – respect for nature and environmental self-assets – influence their brand experiences. The study uses survey data collected on a car brand that incorporated eco-friendly advances. The results show that respect for nature has an impact on how respondents experience the eco-friendliness of brands and that eco-friendly brand experiences in turn influence general brand experiences. The findings also suggest that the effects of the two pro-environmental characteristics depend on the education level of the consumer: eco-friendly brand experiences of highly educated consumers are affected by their respect for nature, whereas those of consumers with lower education levels are affected by environmental self-assets.

  • 42.
    Saari, Ulla A.
    et al.
    Laboratory of Industrial and Information Management, Tampere University of Technology, Tampere, Finland.
    Mäkinen, Saku J.
    Laboratory of Industrial and Information Management, Tampere University of Technology, Tampere, Finland.
    Järventausta, Pertti
    Laboratory of Electrical Energy Engineering, Tampere University of Technology, Tampere, Finland.
    Vilkko, Matti
    Laboratory of Automation and Hydraulic Engineering, Tampere University of Technology, Tampere, Finland.
    Systä, Kari
    Laboratory of Pervasive Computing, Tampere University of Technology, Tampere, Finland.
    Kotilainen, Kirsi
    Laboratory of Industrial and Information Management, Tampere University of Technology, Tampere, Finland.
    Valta, Jussi
    Laboratory of Industrial and Information Management, Tampere University of Technology, Tampere, Finland.
    Björkqvist, Tomas
    Laboratory of Automation and Hydraulic Engineering, Tampere University of Technology, Tampere, Finland.
    Laukkarinen, Teemu
    Laboratory of Pervasive Computing, Tampere University of Technology, Tampere, Finland.
    Engaging students in cross-disciplinary research and education—A processual approach to educational development2019In: Handbook of sustainability science and research / [ed] Walter Leal Filho, Cham: Springer, 2019, p. 353-363Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The creation of future sustainable and efficient energy systems requires a cross-disciplinary approach in engineering education. In order for energy-related engineering students to be prepared for real-world situations after their studies, it is important that, while they are still studying, they obtain the basic skills for handling different concepts, theoretical frameworks and solution types created in the various disciplines involved. At the Tampere University of Technology (TUT), a cross-disciplinary team was formed from four different departments in three different faculties to create a platform for research and education purposes on the university campus. The purpose was to coordinate research and provide students with a wider picture and a concrete implementation of the different layers and aspects that need to be taken into account when creating innovative solutions for future digital energy systems. The creation of the platform started from a successful student ideation competition that produced many viable solutions. This paper describes the bottom-up incremental process by which the cross-disciplinary platform was created. The innovative solutions created in the student ideation competition convinced the university organization that the cross-disciplinary collaboration should have a more permanent platform on the university campus, allowing researchers and students to incorporate more sustainability and systemic aspects into their work, and having a positive impact on the sustainable energy consumption on the campus. 

  • 43.
    Saari, Ulla A.
    et al.
    Tampere University of Technology, Tampere, Finland.
    Mäkinen, Saru
    Tampere University of Technology, Tampere, Finland.
    Study on the capability to measure stakeholders’ brand experiences with a consumer-centric measurement framework2016In: Global Marketing Conference Proceedings 2016 Hong Kong, July 21 - 24, 2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The target of this paper is to introduce a general brand experience measurement scale that can be used to measure brand experiences of the stakeholders of a company. It is proposed that also stakeholders’ brand experiences can be measured with a measurement scale developed for consumer marketing research.

    In literature, there are various different kinds of individual brand constructs andmeasurement frameworks that have been developed for tracking consumers’ brand perceptions; however, these models have not been frequently used to measure brand-related aspects outside consumer-centric situations. The tracking of stakeholders’ brand experiences can help companies to position their brands better in the tightening global competition where also stakeholders have a critical role and can influence the performance of the company (Hult, Mena, Ferrell, & Ferrell, 2011).

    Brands are experienced via stimuli that can be either controlled by the company,including, for example, advertisements, logos, sales environments, sales packages, and services, or then they are out of their control, for example, brand related information can spread freely on the social media or by word-of-mouth (Brakus, Schmitt, & Zarantonello, 2009; Keller, 2013). Thus, it can be said that the measurement of brand experiences can give valuable information to the company on what is the status and reputation of the brand. However, it is not only the customers or consumers that have brand experiences, also stakeholders encounter brands and the way they experience them on the personal level can have a major impact on how they interact and promote the brand in other contexts. Some B2B marketing theories have brought up the importance of understanding long-term relationships between buyers and sellers, including experiences associated with the relationship (Hadjikhani & LaPlaca, 2013) as well as purchase risks (Brown, Zablah, Bellenger, & Johnston, 2011).

    Brand experiences can be measured, for example, with a measurement scale (Brakus et al., 2009) that has been extended with an eco-friendliness dimension (Saari, 2016). This model has been tested with consumers, and this paper argues that the same scale can be useful for monitoring the brand experiences of other stakeholders as well. The extended brand experience scale can be used to monitor whether consumers and stakeholders experience a certain brand to be ecofriendly, and how positively or negatively they are inclined towards the eco-friendliness of the brand experiences.

    With the raising focus on stakeholders’ important role in solving environmentalproblems, the role of stakeholder marketing becomes more critical for a company (Homburg, Stierl, & Bornemann, 2013). And in this situation it becomes also more crucial to follow up what are the brand experiences of stakeholders. The stakeholders’ brand experiences can give a strong indication is the company implementing its strategy correctly and are all the essential elements transparently and authentically communicated to the stakeholders, especially with regard to the environmental development activities that are reflected in the eco-friendliness dimension of brand experiences.Keywords: brand experience; brand .measurement scales; stakeholders’ brandexperiences; stakeholder marketing.

    References:

    Brakus, J. J., Schmitt, B. H., & Zarantonello, L. (2009). Brand Experience: What Is It? How Is It Measured? Does It Affect Loyalty? Journal of Marketing, 73(3), 52-68.

    Brown, B., Zablah, A., Bellenger, D., & Johnston, W. (2011). When do B2B brands influence the decision making of organizational buyers? An examination of therelationship between purchase risk and brand sensitivity. International Journal ofResearch in Marketing, 28 (3), 194-204.

    Hadjikhani, A., & LaPlaca, P. (2013). Development of B2B marketing theory.Industrial Marketing Management, 42(3), 294-305.

    Homburg, C., Stierl, M., & Bornemann, T. (2013). Corporate Social Responsibility in Business-to-Business Markets: How Organizational Customers Account for Supplier Corporate Social Responsibility Engagement. Journal of Marketing,77(6), 54-72.

    Hult, G. T. M., Mena, J. A., Ferrell, O. C., & Ferrell, L. (2011). Stakeholdermarketing: a definition and conceptual framework. AMS Rev, 1, 44–65.

    Keller, K. L. (2013). Strategic Brand Management. Building, Measuring, andManaging Brand Equity. (4 ed.). Essex, England: Pearson Education Limited.

    Saari, U. (2016). Eco-Friendliness in the Brand Experience of High-Tech Products. Tampere University of Technology, Tampere, Finland.

  • 44.
    Sarkhosh-Sara, Ali
    et al.
    University of Isfahan, Isfahan, Iran.
    Tavassoli, Mohammad H.
    University of Isfahan, Isfahan, Iran.
    Heshmati, Almas
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics. Department of Economics, Sogang University, Seoul, South Korea.
    Assessing the sustainability of high-, middle-, and low-income countries: A network DEA model in the presence of both zero data and undesirable outputs2020In: Sustainable Production and Consumption, ISSN 2352-5509, Vol. 21, p. 252-268Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sustainability evaluation has been an important topic for politicians and professionals for the last few decades. A data envelopment analysis (DEA) is a popular technique for evaluating the sustainability of decision-making units (DMUs). The traditional DEA models consider a DMU as black-box thus ignoring the interactions among the different processes. This study proposes a new network data envelopment analysis (NDEA) model for evaluating the sustainability of high-, middle-, and low-income countries. The proposed NDEA model allows us to evaluate sustainable production and distribution stages in a unified framework in the presence of both zero data and undesirable outputs. The results of our proposed model show that countries with high and low incomes perform well in the sustainable production stage but have a weak performance in the sustainable distribution stage. In contrast, middle-income countries have weak performance in the sustainable production stage but good performance in the sustainable distribution stage. Finally, to identify countries’ strengths and weaknesses, we also did a sensitivity analysis. Based on the results, the paper proposes solutions for reducing inefficiencies in the sustainable production and distribution stages. 

  • 45.
    Skärin, Filip
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design, JTH, Produktionsutveckling.
    Rösiö, Carin
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design, JTH, Produktionsutveckling.
    Andersen, Ann-Louise
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design, JTH, Produktionsutveckling.
    Circularity Practices in Manufacturing: A Study of the 20 Largest Manufacturing Companies in Sweden2022In: IFIP Advances in Information and Communication Technology: Advances in Production Management Systems. Smart Manufacturing and Logistics Systems: Turning Ideas into Action. / [ed] D. Y. Kim, G. von Cieminski and D. Romero, Springer, 2022, Vol. 663, p. 399-407Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In line with the accelerating global warming crisis, the concept of circular economy (CE), wherein the utilization and lifetimes of resources and materials are maximised, has gained a significant increase in attention. For manufacturing companies, adapting to a CE is particularly important due to high CO2-e emissions. In order to increase the knowledge regarding how manufacturing companies have adapted to a CE, sustainability reports wherein the companies themselves report upon their circularity practices can be examined. This study has aimed at investigating the publicly available sustainability reports of the 20 largest manufacturing companies in Sweden, with the purpose of identifying which, and on what level of implementation, circularity practices are mentioned. The 10R framework was used as a foundation for categorizing and analysing the identified circularity practices. The findings in this study include a total of 38 unique circularity practices, whereas 13 are categorized as visioned or planned, and 36 are categorized as ongoing or already realised circularity practices. The circularity practices were primarily related to reducing, reusing, and recycling. Suggestions of further research include elaborately describing the circularity practices as well as further exploring the implementation of repairing, refurbishing and remanufacturing amongst manufacturing companies.

  • 46.
    Svensson, Göran
    et al.
    Oslo School of Management, Norway.
    Padin, Carmen
    Vigo University of Spain, Spain.
    Eriksson, David
    University of Borås, Sweden.
    Glocal business sustainability: Performance beyond zero!2016In: International Journal of procurement management, ISSN 1753-8432, E-ISSN 1753-8440, Vol. 9, no 1, p. 15-26Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The paper describes and debates business sustainability beyond zero emissions and neutralised impacts through compensatory performance. Our findings highlight the interconnections and interdependences of sustainability issues across contexts and through time. The vision of performance beyond zero is necessary and required to achieve glocal business sustainability. The implications also include a broadened and positioned view in the present and for the future on the emissions and impacts generated by the world of business locally and globally in relation to Earth's local and global life- and eco-systems. We argue for the future that it is necessary and required to move beyond zero to heal and restore the negative emissions and impact so far caused. The rational and contribution is an offensive and proactive view of contemporary visions and mission of glocal business sustainability performance beyond zero.

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  • 47.
    Ulkhaq, Muhammad Mujiya
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    George Joseph, Reinu Shyle
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    Students’ attitudes towards campus sustainability: A comparison among Jönköping University, Chalmers University of Technology, and University of Gothenburg2019Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The role of higher education institutions (HEIs) in promoting and supporting sustainabil- ity has outstretched over the past decades as a result of various declarations and commit- ments related to the need for sustainability in HEI. As a consequence, HEIs tried to achieve campus sustainability by integrating sustainability concept into their projects, partnerships, assessments, programs, curricula, and research. Accordingly, achieving campus sustainability is not feasible without the involvement of students as the biggest stakeholders of HEI, who have a substantial impact on sustainability by contributing to and supporting campus sustainability. This research aims to compare and analyse the at- titudes of students towards campus sustainability in relation to the influence of the uni- versity. The research was conducted at three universities in Sweden which have different environmental management system certification status, i.e., Jönköping University (JU), Chalmers University of Technology (Chalmers), and University of Gothenburg (GU). The result shows that there is a statistically significant difference in those three universi- ties in general. In detail, only ten out of twenty-two indicators of campus sustainability are different. Further analysis reports that students at GU have the highest attitudes, stu- dents at JU have the lowest ones, while Chalmers is positioned in between them. Analysis and discussion are provided to identify the reasons behind the differences and similarities.

  • 48.
    Wahab, Abdul
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management.
    Kessler, Carl
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management.
    Eco-Friendliness Assessment Of Primary Food Packaging: A case study to assess relevant criteria and evaluate packaging options for sustainable development.2021Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The purpose of this thesis is to investigate how food start-ups (FS) can make their primary food packaging (PFP) more eco-friendly by identifying and evaluating the performance of suited packaging alternative. The purpose was fulfilled by answering the three research questions: 

    RQ1) How to assess the eco-friendliness of PFP?

    RQ2) Which are areas of improvement in environmental performance?

    RQ3) What are the differences in performance across similar PFP’s? 

    Methods: To answer the research questions both the literature review and empirical data was required. The literature study was conducted to gather relevant theories about primary food packaging in food start-ups. To get the required empirical data, a single case study was conducted at a case company that suited the subject. The case study consisted of multiple interviews and document study. This enabled for an analysis in the form of pattern matching in order to answer the research questions and achieve the purpose. 

    Findings: The Study found that to assess the PFP that have direct impact on the environment the functional features and the environmental framework play a central role in the eco- friendliness of PFPs which analyzed the requirements for the PFP and a multi criteria decision making approach for the environmental assessment for the Green-PE. The stakeholder expectations were found by analyzing the criterion for the PFP. In addition, a comparison for an eco-friendlier alternative was analyzed with the current Green-PE to justify the performance for the PFP in FS. 

    Implications: The study results present practical implications with assessing the current Green-PE and evaluating the gaps for improvement areas, while also comparing similar PFP which is an eco-friendlier option for food packaging start-ups. As there has been no general theoretical implications, the findings of the thesis can be used as a basis for deeper insights into the subject through more extensive research. 

    Delimitations & Scope: The focus was to identify and evaluate the current PFP environmental impact and not the other aspects of the life cycle assessment since the scope was limited. Also, a single case study was used rather than multiple case studies to analyze the eco-friendliness for PEPs. 

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  • 49.
    Weiss, Jan Frederic
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management. Centre for Young and Family Enterprises (CYFE), Università degli Studi di Bergamo, Bergamo, Italy.
    Anisimova, Tatiana Anatolevena
    Centre for Young and Family Enterprises (CYFE), Università degli Studi di Bergamo, Bergamo, Italy.
    The innovation and performance effects of well-designed environmental regulation: evidence from Sweden2019In: Industry and Innovation, ISSN 1366-2716, E-ISSN 1469-8390, Vol. 26, no 5, p. 534-567Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper provides novel empirical insights into the Porter hypothesis (PH) and its dynamic nature. The PH posits that well-designed environmental regulations induce eco-innovations at polluting firms that improve both their environmental and business performance via ‘innovation offsets.’ We conduct an econometric test of this proposition, using Swedish pulp and paper plants as empirical application. Swedish environmental regulation of polluting industries provides an interesting case because it has been praised, due to containing elements of ‘well-designed’ regulations, for being conducive to accomplishing the ‘win-win’ situation of mutual environmental and economic benefits. The empirical results indicate that flexible and dynamic command-and-control regulation and economic incentive instruments have induced innovation offsets through improved energy efficiency. Our study bears important implications: empirical tests of the PH that do not account for its dynamic nature, and that do not measure ‘well-designed’ regulations, might provide misleading conclusions as to its validity.

  • 50.
    Yaghi, Ali
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School.
    Eklund, Axel
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School.
    Strategies and barriers to implement an environmental management system: Small size companies in the metal industry2022Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    There has been an increased awareness of the current problems regarding the environmental changes in the world. Companies are acknowledging these problems more and more to try and prevent the heavy pollution humans contribute. The metal industry is one of the highest emitters in the world because its manufacturing, production, and processing require substantial amounts of energy. While the pressure of addressing environmental issues has been on the bigger companies in history, the smaller ones are being caught up in the same pressure from customers and partners. Because of the raised awareness of the environmental impact, even the smaller companies, which are low on environmental impact alone but substantial when defined as a whole market, are more often required to implement an environmental management system. However, the limitations of resources are different for smaller companies. There is no structured way to work towards a certification in ISO 14001 with the barriers that might limit them.

    This study has its focus on gathering information in a qualitative mean to interpret and generalize the reality of smaller companies in the metal industry. By doing so, the main goal is to investigate the barriers that appear for the management when implementing an EMS according to ISO 14001 and identify the potential procedures taken to reach the end goal of certification.

    The results of this study are that companies don’t face the barrier of economic resources and the true barrier is the interpretation of costs. The implementation of a certified EMS is a long-term investment and generates money through continuous improvements and creates a business opportunity by opening a new market to customers with ISO 14001 requirements. Knowledge was a barrier and the change in ISO 14001 being more compatible with previous quality certification ISO 9001 helped the implementation.

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