Change search
Refine search result
1 - 17 of 17
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Burbano, X.
    et al.
    Division of Disease Prevention, Department of Psychiatry/Behav. Sci., Univ. of Miami School of Medicine, Miami, FL, United States.
    Miguez-Burbano, M. J.
    Division of Disease Prevention, Department of Psychiatry/Behav. Sci., Univ. of Miami School of Medicine, Miami, FL, United States.
    McCollister, K.
    Dept. of Epidemiology/Public Health, Univ. of Miami School of Medicine, Miami, FL, United States.
    Zhang, G.
    Division of Disease Prevention, Department of Psychiatry/Behav. Sci., Univ. of Miami School of Medicine, Miami, FL, United States.
    Rodriguez, A.
    Department of Medicine, Univ. of Miami School of Medicine, Miami, FL, United States.
    Ruiz, P.
    Department of Pathology, Univ. of Miami School of Medicine, Miami, FL, United States.
    Lecusay, Robert
    Division of Disease Prevention, Department of Psychiatry/Behav. Sci., Univ. of Miami School of Medicine, Miami, FL, United States.
    Shor-Posner, G.
    Division of Disease Prevention, Department of Psychiatry/Behav. Sci., Univ. of Miami School of Medicine, Miami, FL, United States.
    Impact of a selenium chemoprevention clinical trial on hospital admissions of HIV-infected participants2002In: HIV Clinical Trials, ISSN 1528-4336, E-ISSN 1945-5771, Vol. 3, no 6, p. 483-491Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: To evaluate the impact of selenium chemoprevention (200 μg/day) on hospitalizations in HIV-positive individuals. Method: Data were obtained from 186 HIV+ men and women participating in a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled selenium clinical trial (1998-2000). Supplements were dispensed monthly, and clinical evaluations were conducted every 6 months. Inpatient hospitalizations, hospitalization costs, and rates of hospitalization were determined 2 years before and during the trial. Results: At enrollment, no significant differences in CD4 cell counts or viral burden were observed between the two study arms. Fewer placebo-treated participants were using antiretrovirals (p < .05). The total number of hospitalizations declined from 157 before the trial to 103 during the 2-year study. A marked decrease in total admission rates (RR = 0.38; p =.002) and percent of hospitalizations due to infection/100 patients for those receiving selenium was observed (p = .01). As a result, the cost for hospitalization decreased 58% in the selenium group, compared to a 30% decrease in the placebo group (p = .001). In the final analyses, selenium therapy continued to be a significant independent factor associated with lower risk of hospitalization (p = .001). Conclusion: Selenium supplementation appears to be a beneficial adjuvant treatment to decrease hospitalizations as well as the cost of caring for HIV-1-infected patients.

  • 2.
    Carlsson, Emma
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Biomedical Platform.
    The importance of psychological and physical stressors on diabetes-related immunity in a young population – an interdisciplinary approach2016Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The prevalence of immunological disorders such as type 1 diabetes (T1D) is increasingly common amongst children, adolescents and young adults. There is also an increase in psychosomatic symptoms (depression, insomnia, anxiety, headaches and fatigue etc.) as well as a decrease in physical activity amongst young people, affecting the well-being and overall health of our younger population. It is therefore important to study the effects of psychological and physical stressors on the immune system, to evaluate their impact on juvenile health.

    Aim: This thesis explores the impact of psychological and physical stressors on the cellular immune system with special focus on diabetes-related immunity in a young population, using an interdisciplinary approach.

    Method: When exploring the impact of psychological and physical stressors such as psychological stress due to exposure to psychological stressful experiences or degree of physical activity/training on the cellular immune system in children, adolescents and young women, peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) were stimulated with antigens (tetanus toxoid (TT) and β-lactoglobulin (βLG)) as well as diabetes-related autoantigens (insulin, heat shock protein 60 (HSP60), tyrosine phosphatase-2 (IA-2) and glutamic acid decarboxylase 65 (GAD65)) and secreted cytokines and chemokines were measured by multiplex fluorochrome technique (Luminex). Populations of Thelper (Th) cells (CD4+), T-cytotoxic (Tc) cells (CD8+), B cells (CD19+), Natural Killer (NK) cells (CD56+CD16+) as well as regulatory T (Treg) cells (CD4+CD25+FoxP3+CD127-), and their expression of CD39 and CD45RA were studied by flow cytometry. Diabetes-related parameters (glucose, C-peptide,proinsulin, pancreatic polypeptide and peptide YY) were measured to studyβ-cell activity and appetite regulation and cortisol was used as a biological marker for psychological and physical stress.

    Results: Children in families exposed to psychological stress showed an imbalanced cellular immune response as well as an increased immune response towards diabetes-related autoantigens. Also, previous exposure to psychological stress as well as current exposure to psychological stress in young women showed an increased immune response towards diabetes-related autoantigens. Further, previous exposure to psychological stress in young women showed increased numbers of circulating CD56+CD16+ NK cells as wellas decreased numbers of circulating CD4+CD25+FoxP3+CD127- Treg cells. High physical activity in children showed decreased spontaneous immune response as well as a decreased immune response towards diabetes-related autoantigens, while low physical activity in children showed an increased immune response towards diabetes-related autoantigens. Further, endurance training in adolescents, especially in adolescent males and young adolescents, showed an increased immune response towards the diabetes-related autoantigen IA-2.

    Conclusion: It is evident that psychological and physical stressors such as exposure to psychological stress and degree of physical activity/training impact the cellular immune system. Experiences associated with psychological stress seem to have a negative effect on the cellular immune system in a young population, causing an imbalance in the immune system that could possibly induce diabetes-related immunity. High physical activity in children seems to have a protective effect against diabetes-related immunity. In contrast, low physical activity in children and endurance training in adolescents seems to induce diabetes-related immunity. It is very likely that psychological stressful experiences, low physical activity and intense training such as endurance training all play important roles in the immunological process leading to the development of type 1 diabetes.

    Download full text (pdf)
    Kappa
  • 3.
    Carlsson, Emma
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Biomedical Platform. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine.
    Frostell, Anneli
    Division of Medical Diagnostics, Ryhov County Hospital, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Ludvigsson, Johnny
    Division of Paediatrics and Diabetes Research Centre, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Faresjö, Maria
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Biomedical Platform.
    Psychological Stress in Children May Alter the Immune Response2014In: Journal of Immunology, ISSN 0022-1767, E-ISSN 1550-6606, Vol. 192, no 5, p. 2071-2081Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Psychological stress is a public health issue even in children and has been associated with a number of immunological diseases. The aim of this study was to examine the relationship between psychological stress and immune response in healthy children, with special focus on autoimmunity. In this study, psychological stress was based on a composite measure of stress in the family across the domains: 1) serious life events, 2) parenting stress, 3) lack of social support, and 4) parental worries. PBMCs, collected from 5-y-old high-stressed children (n = 26) and from 5-y-old children without high stress within the family (n = 52), from the All Babies In Southeast Sweden cohort, were stimulated with Ags (tetanus toxoid and β-lactoglobulin) and diabetes-related autoantigens (glutamic acid decarboxylase 65, insulin, heat shock protein 60, and tyrosine phosphatase). Immune markers (cytokines and chemokines), clinical parameters (C-peptide, proinsulin, glucose), and cortisol, as an indicator of stress, were analyzed. Children from families with high psychological stress showed a low spontaneous immune activity (IL-5, IL-10, IL-13, IL-17, CCL2, CCL3, and CXCL10; p < 0.01) but an increased immune response to tetanus toxoid, β-lactoglobulin, and the autoantigens glutamic acid decarboxylase 65, heat shock protein 60, and tyrosine phosphatase (IL-5, IL-6, IL-10, IL-13, IL-17, IFN-γ, TNF-α, CCL2, CCL3, and CXCL10; p < 0.05). Children within the high-stress group showed high level of cortisol, but low level of C-peptide, compared with the control group (p < 0.05). This supports the hypothesis that psychological stress may contribute to an imbalance in the immune response but also to a pathological effect on the insulin-producing β cells.

  • 4.
    Carlsson, Emma
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine.
    Magnusson, Anette
    Tompa, Andrea
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine.
    Bülow, Per
    Gerdner, Arne
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Behavioural Science and Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Research Platform of Social Work.
    Faresjö, Maria
    Psychological stress affects the numbers of circulating CD56+CD16+ and CD4+CD25+FoxP3+CD127- cells and induce an immune response towards type 1 diabetes-related autoantigens in young women2016Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 5.
    Carlsson, Emma
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine.
    Rundkvist, Louise
    Blomstrand, Peter
    Faresjö, Maria
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine.
    Endurance training during adolescence induces a pro-inflammatory response directed towards the diabetes-related autoantigen tyrosine phosphatase-2Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 6.
    Goodkin, K.
    et al.
    Dept. of Psychiat./Behav. Sciences, Univ. of Miami School of Medicine, Miami, FL, United States.
    Heckman, T.
    Department of Psychology, Ohio University, Athens, OH, United States.
    Siegel, K.
    School of Public Health, Columbia University, New York, NY, United States.
    Linsk, M.
    Jane Adams School of Social Work, University of Illinois, Chicago, IL, United States.
    Khamis, I.
    Dept. of Psychiat./Behav. Sciences, Univ. of Miami School of Medicine, Miami, FL, United States.
    Lee, D.
    Dept. of Psychiat./Behav. Sciences, Univ. of Miami School of Medicine, Miami, FL, United States.
    Lecusay, Robert
    Dept. of Psychiat./Behav. Sciences, Univ. of Miami School of Medicine, Miami, FL, United States.
    Poindexter, C. C.
    Jane Adams School of Social Work, University of Illinois, Chicago, IL, United States.
    Mason, S. J.
    Jane Adams School of Social Work, University of Illinois, Chicago, IL, United States.
    Suarez, P.
    Dept. of Psychiat./Behav. Sciences, Univ. of Miami School of Medicine, Miami, FL, United States.
    Eisdorfer, C.
    Dept. of Psychiat./Behav. Sciences, Univ. of Miami School of Medicine, Miami, FL, United States.
    "Putting a face" on HIV infection/AIDS in older adults: A psychosocial context2003In: Journal of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndromes, ISSN 1525-4135, E-ISSN 1944-7884, Vol. 33, p. S171-S184Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Older HIV-1-seropositive individuals largely have not been investigated with respect to their psychosocial characteristics. In this article, the authors review research reported to date regarding the psychosocial context of this growing subgroup of HIV-1-infected individuals. Specifically, the authors consider the characteristics of mood state, life stressor burden, social support network, and coping strategies that individuals older than 50 years are more likely to adopt in adjusting to HIV-1 infection. The authors also separately consider issues of caregiving burden. Data supporting a theoretically based stressor-support-coping model are presented and related to targeting psychotherapeutic interventions for this age group.

  • 7. Kivling, A
    et al.
    Nilsson, L
    Faresjö, Maria
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Biomedical Platform.
    How and when to pick up the best signals from markers associated with T-regulatory cells?2009In: JIM - Journal of Immunological Methods, ISSN 0022-1759, E-ISSN 1872-7905, Vol. 345, no 1-2, p. 29-39Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 8.
    Luetragoon, Thitiya
    et al.
    Department of Medical Technology, Naresuan University, Phitsanulok, Thailand.
    Rutqvist, Lars E.
    Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Tangvarasittichai, Orathai
    Department of Medical Technology, Naresuan University, Phitsanulok, Thailand.
    Andersson, Bengt-Åke
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Biomedical Platform. Department of Laboratory Medicine, Ryhov Hospital, Jönköping, Sweden; and Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Löfgren, Sture
    Department of Laboratory Medicine, Ryhov Hospital, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Usuwanthim, Kanchana
    Department of Medical Technology, Naresuan University, Phitsanulok, Thailand.
    Lewin, Nongnit L.
    Department of Laboratory Medicine, Ryhov Hospital, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Interaction among smoking status, single nucleotide polymorphisms and markers of systemic inflammation in healthy individuals2018In: Immunology, ISSN 0019-2805, E-ISSN 1365-2567, Vol. 154, no 1, p. 98-103Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cigarette smoke contains toxic and carcinogenic substances that contribute to the development of cancer and various diseases. Genetic variation might be important, because not all smokers develop smoking-related disease. The current study addressed the possible interactions among selected single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in genes related to systemic inflammation, smoking status, the levels of circulating immune response cells and plasma biomarkers of systemic inflammation. Sixty-four healthy blood donors were recruited, 31 of whom were current smokers and 33 were never-users of tobacco products, references. Compared to references, the smokers showed significantly increased levels of circulating total white blood cells, lymphocytes, monocytes, neutrophils, basophils and C-reactive protein (CRP). Smokers also more frequently exhibited circulating cell phenotypes that are associated with an immunocompromised state: CD8dim cells in the lymphocyte group, CD13+CD11+, CD13+CD14+, CD13+CD56+ cells in the monocyte group and CD13+CD11+, CD13+CD56+ cells in the neutrophil group. We observed an interaction among SNPs, smoking status and some of the studied biomarkers. The average plasma CRP level was significantly higher among the smokers, with the highest level found among those with the CRP rs1800947 CC genotype. Additionally, an increased CD8+GZB+ cells in the CD8dim group were found among smokers with the GZB rs8192917 AA genotype. Thus, smoking appears to be associated with systemic inflammation and increased levels of circulating immunosuppressive cells. The extent of these effects was associated with SNPs among the smokers. This observation may contribute to a better understanding of the genetic susceptibility of smoking-related disease and the variations observed in clinical outcomes. 

  • 9. Pawelec, Graham
    et al.
    Derhovanessian, Evelyna
    Larbi, Anis
    Strindhall, Jan
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Biomedical Platform.
    Wikby, Anders
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine.
    Cytomegalovirus and human immunosenescence2009In: Reviews in Medical Virology, ISSN 1052-9276, E-ISSN 1099-1654, Vol. 19, no 1, p. 47-56Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    'Immunosenescence' is all imprecise term used to describe deleterious age-associated changes to immune parameters observed in all mammals studied so far. Primarily anecdotal evidence implies that failing immunity is responsible for the increased incidence and severity of infectious disease in old people. However, there is a serious dearth of accurate hard data concerning the actual cause of death in the elderly and the contribution thereto of the multitude of age-associated alterations measured in the immune system. Cross-sectional studies comparing those currently young With those currently old reveal a large number of differences in the distribution of immune cell types in the blood, and to some extent the functional integrity of those cells. Many of these parameters differ markedly between individuals infected with CMV and uninfected people, regardless of infection with other persistent herpesviruses. The adaptive arm of immunity appears to be more seriously affected than the innate arm, particularly the T lymphocytes. However, cross-sectional studies suffer the disadvantage that like is not being compared with like, because the conditions applied during the entire life course of the currently elderly were different from those applied now to the young. These differences in environment, nutrition, pathology and possibly genetics, rather than merely age, may be expected to influence the parameters studied. Moreover, pathogen exposure of the currently elderly was also different from contemporary exposure, probably including CMV. Some of the problems associated with cross-sectional studies can be overcome by performing longitudinal studies, as pointed out in an earlier analysis of the Baltimore Longitudinal Ageing study looking at lymphocyte numbers. However, longitudinal studies are challenging in humans. L Nonetheless, the pioneering Swedish OCTO/NONA studies of the very elderly which for the first time included a range of immune parameters, have identified a set of immune parameters predicting mortality at 2, 4 and 6 year follow-up; CMV infection makes a material contribution to this so-called immune risk profile (IRP)'. Whether the IRP is informative in younger individuals and the mechanism of the CMV effect is discussed in this review. 

  • 10.
    Sandberg, Kristin
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Biomedical Platform.
    Vardanian, Lilit
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Biomedical Platform.
    Påverkan på subpopulationer av CD4+ och CD8+ T-celler hos unga vuxna som upplevt psykisk stress vid olika livsskeden2017Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 180 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Exposure of psychological stress may alter the immune system. The aim of the study was to investigate how psychological stress at different lifespans, affect subpopulations of T-cells in young adults of both genders. Blood samples were collected from young adults (18-22 years, 29 women and 16 men) who had experienced psychological stress, and young adults (18-22 years, 16 women and 10 men) who had not experienced psychological stress. Subpopulations of CD4+ T-helper (Th)-cells and CD8+ cytotoxic-T (Tc)-cells such as naïve cells, central memory (TCM)-, effector memory (TEM)-, late differentiated effector memory (TEM-late) and terminally differentiated effector memory (TEMRA)-cells were studied by flow cytometry. Experienced childhood maltreatment showed increased percentage of ThCM-cells in women, and increased percentage of naïve Th- and Tc-cells in men. Women who experienced a stressful life event showed increased percentage of ThEM-late-cells, and women who experienced a stressful life event and experienced stress in the past month showed increased percentage of naïve Th-cells and decreased percentage of ThEM-cells. The results indicated that childhood maltreatment affect both genders, and that women are more affected by psychological stress. The findings should be interpreted as suggestive, and future studies should be conducted on larger study populations for more reliable results.

    Download full text (pdf)
    Påverkan på subpopulationer av CD4+ och CD8+ T-celler hos unga vuxna som upplevt psykisk stress vid olika livsskeden
  • 11.
    Shor-Posner, G.
    et al.
    University of Miami School of Medicine, Division of Disease Prevention, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Miami, FL, United States.
    Lecusay, Robert
    Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Division of Disease Prevention, University of Miami School of Medicine, Miami, FL, United States.
    Morales, G.
    Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Division of Disease Prevention, University of Miami School of Medicine, Miami, FL, United States.
    Campa, A.
    Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Division of Disease Prevention, University of Miami School of Medicine, Miami, FL, United States.
    Miguez-Burbano, M. J.
    Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Division of Disease Prevention, University of Miami School of Medicine, Miami, FL, United States.
    Neuroprotection in HIV-positive drug users: Implications for antioxidant therapy2002In: Journal of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndromes, ISSN 1525-4135, E-ISSN 1944-7884, Vol. 31, p. S84-S88Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Impaired neuroprotection resulting from oxidative stress has been implicated in neurodegeneration in a number of pathologic conditions of the brain, including both subcortical and cortical type dementias. Production of excessive oxidative stress, moreover, can lead to elevated levels of certain proinflammatory cytokines that are considered to be contributing factors to neuronal injury and are evident in HIV-related dementia as well as in other neurodegenerative conditions. Inhibitors of oxidative damage could thus be promising therapeutic agents for preventing progressive nerve cell death and slowing the advance of neurodegenerative disease. The potential of antioxidant therapy to provide neuroprotection is substantiated by studies demonstrating reduced oxidative stress with supplementation and lower risk for cognitive impairment with higher plasma antioxidant levels.

  • 12.
    Shor-Posner, G.
    et al.
    Division of Disease Prevention, Department of Psychiatry, Miami, FL, United States.
    Miguez, M. J.
    Division of Disease Prevention, Department of Psychiatry, Miami, FL, United States.
    Pineda, L.
    Division of Disease Prevention, Department of Psychiatry, Miami, FL, United States.
    Rodriguez, A.
    Division of Disease Prevention, Department of Psychiatry, Miami, FL, United States.
    Ruiz, P.
    Division of Disease Prevention, Department of Psychiatry, Miami, FL, United States.
    Castillo, G.
    Division of Disease Prevention, Department of Psychiatry, Miami, FL, United States.
    Burbano, X.
    Division of Disease Prevention, Department of Psychiatry, Miami, FL, United States.
    Lecusay, Robert
    Division of Disease Prevention, Department of Psychiatry, Miami, FL, United States.
    Baum, M.
    Division of Disease Prevention, Department of Psychiatry, Miami, FL, United States.
    Impact of selenium status on the pathogenesis of mycobacterial disease in HIV-1-infected drug users during the era of highly active antiretroviral therapy2002In: Journal of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndromes, ISSN 1525-4135, E-ISSN 1944-7884, Vol. 29, no 2, p. 169-173Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The risk of mycobacterial disease is significantly increased in drug abusers as well as in immunocompromised HIV-1-infected individuals. The essential trace element selenium has an important function in maintaining immune processes and may, thus, have a critical role in clearance of mycobacteria. The impact of selenium status on the development of mycobacterial diseases in HIV-1-seropositive drug users was investigated over a 2-year period (1999-2001). Twelve cases of mycobacterial disease (tuberculosis, 9; infection due to atypical Mycobacterium species, 3) occurred; these 12 cases were compared with 32 controls with no history of respiratory infections who were matched on age, sex, and HIV status. Significant risk for development of mycobacterial disease was associated with a CD4 cell count of <200/mm(3), malnutrition, and selenium levels of less than or equal to 135 mug/L (patients with these levels were 13 times more likely to develop mycobacterial disease). Multivariate analyses controlling for antiretroviral treatment and CD4 cell count revealed that both body mass index and selenium level remained significant factors in the relative risk for developing mycobacterial disease (relative risk, 3; p =.015); these findings suggest that selenium status may have a profound impact on the pathogenesis of mycobacterial disease.

  • 13. Stark, L
    et al.
    Matussek, A
    Strindhall, J
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Biomedical Platform.
    Geffers, R
    Buer, J
    Kihlström, E
    Monnecke, S
    Löfgren, S
    Lindgren, PE
    Staphylococcus aureus isolates from blood and anterior nares induce similar innate immune responses in endothelial cells2009In: APMIS: Acta pathologica, microbiologica et immunologica Scandinavica. Supplementum, ISSN 0903-465X, E-ISSN 1600-5503, Vol. 117, no 11, p. 814-824Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To evaluate the possibility to distinguish virulent from non-virulent isolates, gene expression in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) induced by invasive and colonizing isolates of Staphylococcus aureus was compared. Gene expression in HUVEC was analyzed by microarray analysis after 4 h of infection with Staphylococcus aureus, isolated from healthy nasal carriers (n = 5) and from blood of septic patients (n = 5), to explore possible differences between the groups of bacteria in interaction with HUVEC. All isolates were spa-typed to disclose strain relatedness. Moreover, the isolates were characterized with DNA microarray to determine the presence of virulence genes and to investigate the potential genes of importance in HUVEC interaction. The expression of 41 genes was up-regulated, and four were down-regulated in HUVEC by all isolates. Most of the up-regulated genes encode cytokines, chemokines, interferon-induced proteins, proteins regulating apoptosis and cell proliferation. There was no difference in the gene expression pattern between HUVEC infected with invasive or colonizing isolates. Furthermore, there was no difference in the presence of bacterial virulence genes between the two groups. In conclusion, our data indicate that S. aureus isolates induce comparable expression patterns in HUVEC, irrespective of invasiveness or presence of virulence genes. 

  • 14.
    Tompa, Andrea
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Biomedical Platform.
    Subsets of CD4+, CD8+ and CD25hi lymphocytes are in general not influenced by isolation and long-term cryopreservation2018Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 15.
    Tompa, Andrea
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Biomedical Platform. Department of Laboratory Medicine, Region Jönköping County, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Nilsson-Bowers, Anette
    Department of Laboratory Medicine, Region Jönköping County, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Faresjö, Maria
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Biomedical Platform.
    Subsets of CD4+, CD8+, and CD25hi Lymphocytes Are in General Not Influenced by Isolation and Long-Term Cryopreservation2018In: Journal of Immunology, ISSN 0022-1767, E-ISSN 1550-6606, Vol. 201, no 6, p. 1799-1809Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Several key factors can affect the outcome of immunological studies; isolation/cryopreservation can possibly alter T, B, NK, and T-regulatory (Treg) cell marker expression patterns. Blood samples from 50 blood donors supplemented with Na-heparin or K2EDTA were handled within 4 and 24 h after blood sampling. PBMC were isolated with different density gradients. Flow cytometric analysis of intracellular and extracellular CD markers was performed on blood samples freshly isolated PBMC, and PBMC was thawed 6 and 12 mo post-cryopreservation for the purpose of identifying B, NK, Th, T-cytotoxic, and Treg cells. No differences were observed in the percentages for CD3+, CD3+CD4+, CD3+CD8+, CD19+, or CD56+CD16+ cells within 24 h of sampling regardless of which supplement or isolation techniques were used. Differentiated (diff) CD4+ cells were in general less affected by isolation and cryopreservation than diff CD8+ cells. Terminally diff effector CD4+ and CD8+ cells were not affected by either isolation of lymphocytes or cryopreservation. In contrast, naive and early-diff effector memory CD4+ and CD8+ cells were affected by isolation and cryopreservation. The percentages of Treg cells defined as CD4+CD25hi expressing CD101 or CD129, CD4+CD25hiCD127, and CD4+CD25hiCD127FOXP3+, respectively, remained stable after isolation and cryopreservation. Subsets expressing CD127, with or without FOXP3, were not affected by isolation/cryopreservation. Subsets expressing CD39, contrary to CD45RA, on CD4+CD25+CD127 cells with or without FOXP3 were not affected by either isolation or cryopreservation. In conclusion, subsets of CD4+, CD8+, and CD25hi lymphocytes are in general not influenced by isolation and long-term cryopreservation.

  • 16.
    Wilkie, F. L.
    et al.
    Dept. of Psychiat./Behav. Sciences, Univ. of Miami School of Medicine, Miami, FL, United States.
    Goodkin, T.
    Dept. of Psychiat./Behav. Sciences, Univ. of Miami School of Medicine, Miami, FL, United States.
    Khamis, L.
    Dept. of Psychiat./Behav. Sciences, Univ. of Miami School of Medicine, Miami, FL, United States.
    van Zuilen, M. H.
    Dept. of Psychiat./Behav. Sciences, Univ. of Miami School of Medicine, Miami, FL, United States.
    Lee, D.
    Dept. of Psychiat./Behav. Sciences, Univ. of Miami School of Medicine, Miami, FL, United States.
    Lecusay, Robert
    Dept. of Psychiat./Behav. Sciences, Univ. of Miami School of Medicine, Miami, FL, United States.
    Concha, M.
    Department of Neurology, Univ. of Miami School of Medicine, Miami, FL, United States.
    Symes, S.
    Department of Internal Medicine, Univ. of Miami School of Medicine, Miami, FL, United States.
    Suarez, P.
    Dept. of Psychiat./Behav. Sciences, Univ. of Miami School of Medicine, Miami, FL, United States.
    Eisdorfer, C.
    Dept. of Psychiat./Behav. Sciences, Univ. of Miami School of Medicine, Miami, FL, United States.
    Cognitive functioning in younger and older HIV-1 - Infected adults2003In: Journal of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndromes, ISSN 1525-4135, E-ISSN 1944-7884, Vol. 33, p. S93-S105Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In young adults, a major neurologic complication of HIV-1 infection is cognitive motor impairment. Epidemiologic findings suggest that increasing age is a significant risk factor for HIV-1-associated dementia as the AIDS-defining illness. Findings from the few studies that have directly measured cognition in younger and older HIV-1-infected adults, however, have been mixed, in pan, because of small sample sizes and other methodologic differences between studies. The authors present preliminary findings on cognitive functioning in symptomatic HIV-1-infected younger (aged 20-39 years) and older (aged 50 years or older) adults. Independent of age, HIV-1 infection was accompanied by learning and memory retrieval deficits, which were significantly associated with high plasma viral loads in the young adults. Relative to the younger and older HIV-1-negative (HIV-1-) groups, only the younger HIV-1-positive (HIV-1(+))group had significantly longer reaction times (RTs). Within the older HIV-1(+) group, however, longer simple and choice RTs were significantly correlated with higher viral loads and lower CD4 cell counts. Although HIV-1 infection affects cognition independent of age, longitudinal studies involving large numbers of older individuals are needed to determine whether there are age differences in the prevalence, nature, and severity of HIV-1-associated cognitive dysfunction.

  • 17.
    Wilsson, Åsa
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine.
    Lind, Sara
    Division of Medical Microbiology, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Öhman, Lena
    Division of Medical Microbiology, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden; and Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Nilsdotter-Augustinsson, Åsa
    Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Lundqvist-Setterud, Helen
    Division of Medical Microbiology, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden; Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Apoptotic neutrophils containing Staphylococcus epidermidis stimulate macrophages to release the proinflammatory cytokines tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-62008In: FEMS Immunology and Medical Microbiology, ISSN 0928-8244, E-ISSN 1574-695X, Vol. 53, no 1, p. 126-135Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Staphylococcus epidermidis infections are usually nosocomial and involve colonization of biomaterials. The immune defense system cannot efficiently control the bacteria during these infections, which often results in protracted chronic inflammation, in which a key event is disturbed removal of neutrophils by tissue macrophages. While ingesting uninfected apoptotic neutrophils, macrophages release anti-inflammatory cytokines that lead to resolution of inflammation. In clinical studies, we have previously found elevated levels of the proinflammatory cytokines tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) and interleukin-6 in synovial fluid from prostheses infected with coagulase negative staphylococci. We show that macrophages phagocytosing apoptotic neutrophils containing S. epidermidis released TNF-alpha and interleukin-6, whereas macrophages phagocytosing spontaneously apoptotic neutrophils did not. This difference was not due to dissimilar phagocytic capacities, because macrophages ingested both types of neutrophils to the same extent. The activation was induced mainly by the apoptotic neutrophils themselves, not by the few remaining extracellular bacteria. Macrophages were not activated by apoptotic neutrophils that contained paraformaldehyde-killed S. epidermidis. Proinflammatory reactions induced by clearance of apoptotic neutrophils containing S. epidermidis might represent an important mechanism to combat the infective agent. This activation of macrophages may contribute to the development of chronic inflammation instead of inflammation resolution.

1 - 17 of 17
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf