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  • 1.
    Abrahamsson, Linus
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication.
    Johansson, Oscar
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication.
    Håller utvecklingen: En studie om hur hållbar utveckling undervisas i årskurserna 4-6.2016Independent thesis Basic level (professional degree), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [sv]

    Undervisningen i hållbar utveckling har sedan mitten av 1990-talet använts som en av tre dominerande miljöundervisningstraditioner i skolan. Hållbar utveckling är idag inget eget ämne, men kursplanen för årskurserna 4-6 lyfter fram begreppet i flertalet ämnen samt att området ska ses ur ett ämnesövergripande perspektiv. Då hållbar utveckling ska undervisas under hela grundskolan har litteraturstudien inriktats på hur undervisningen bedrivs i årskurserna 4-6 och vilken betydelse läraren har för elevernas förståelse. Genom en översikt av aktuell forskning har likheter och skillnader funnits mellan en rad olika arbetssätt. Studien har främst ett fokus på miljöperspektivet inom hållbar utveckling. Studien visar att det finns flera sätt att arbeta med hållbar utveckling som eventuellt kan ha både för och nackdelar. Simulering via datorspel samt utomhuspedagogik är områden forskarna lyfter fram. Studien tar även upp vilka handlingar som är vanligt förekommande i miljöundervisningen. Slutligen presenterar studien en diskussion där resultatet kopplas till våra tidigare erfarenheter och framtida yrkesroll. Något vi finner intressant i studien är avsaknaden av forskning som vänder sig till årskurserna 4-6. 

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    Håller utvecklingen
  • 2.
    Adlemo, Anders
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Department of Computer Science and Informatics.
    A FRAMEWORK FOR A SUSTAINABILITY TRANSITION OF TWO ENGINEERING MASTER’S COURSES2023In: Proceedings of the International CDIO Conference, Norges teknisk-naturvitenskapelige universitet , 2023, p. 67-83Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sustainability, as a concept, is permeating most of today’s human activities, including higher education. The increased importance put on sustainability depends largely on the increased awareness of the huge environmental, social, and economic challenges that humanity is currently facing. As is the case with most complex themes, the route towards the application of appropriate actions starts with enlightenment developed within education, where different engineering programs form important subareas. To address this, CDIO Syllabus 3.0 in general, but optional standard 1 in specific, does now to an even greater extent handle sustainability issues. This paper presents a framework that is built upon several key concepts that are strongly related to education for sustainable development (ESD) at the university level, such as key sustainability concepts (as defined by UNESCO), sustainability development goals (as defined by the United Nations) and constructive alignment (as defined by Biggs and Tang). The framework is applied to two engineering master’s courses where sustainability concepts and development goals are integrated and constructively aligned in the learning outcomes, teaching and learning activities, and assessments. Through the analysis of the two courses concerning sustainability, the framework is shown to provide a means for the analysis of how sustainability is currently incorporated in a course, highlight what possible teaching/learning shortcomings exist, and help identify actions that can be taken to overcome these shortcomings. The objective of the framework is thus to support course managers in the development of appropriate actions related to sustainability.

  • 3.
    Alatalo, Juha M.
    et al.
    Department of Ecology and Genetics, Uppsala University, Visby, Sweden.
    Little, Chelsea, J.
    Department of Ecology and Genetics, Uppsala University, Visby, Sweden.
    Jägerbrand, Annika K.
    Statens väg- och transportforskningsinstitut, Miljö, MILJÖ.
    Molau, Ulf
    Göteborgs Universitet.
    Dominance hierarchies, diversity and species richness of vascular plants in an alpine meadow: contrasting short and medium term responses to simulated global change2014In: PeerJ, E-ISSN 2167-8359, Vol. 2, article id e406Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We studied the impact of simulated global change on a high alpine meadow plant community. Specifically, we examined whether short-term (5 years) responses are good predictors for medium-term (7 years) changes in the system by applying a factorial warming and nutrient manipulation to 20 plots in Latnjajaure, subarctic Sweden. Seven years of experimental warming and nutrient enhancement caused dramatic shifts in dominance hierarchies in response to the nutrient and the combined warming and nutrient enhancement treatments. Dominance hierarchies in the meadow moved from a community being dominated by cushion plants, deciduous, and evergreen shrubs to a community being dominated by grasses, sedges, and forbs. Short-term responses were shown to be inconsistent in their ability to predict medium-term responses for most functional groups, however, grasses showed a consistent and very substantial increase in response to nutrient addition over the seven years.

    The non-linear responses over time point out the importance of longer-term studies with repeated measurements to be able to better predict future changes. Forecasted changes to temperature and nutrient availability have implications for trophic interactions, and may ultimately influence the access to and palatability of the forage for grazers. Depending on what anthropogenic change will be most pronounced in the future (increase in nutrient deposits, warming, or a combination of them both), different shifts in community dominance hierarchies may occur. Generally, this study supports the productivity–diversity relationship found across arctic habitats, with community diversity peaking in mid-productivity systems and degrading as nutrient availability increases further. This is likely due the increasing competition in plant–plant interactions and the shifting dominance structure with grasses taking over the experimental plots, suggesting that global change could have high costs to biodiversity in the Arctic.

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    FULLTEXT01
  • 4.
    Avery, Helen
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Learning Practices inside and outside School (LPS), Sustainability Education Research (SER). Centre for Middle Eastern Studies, Lund University, Sweden.
    How to manage change creatively: unravelling the conundrum of business-state relations2019Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Numerous vulnerabilities have been noted in the current structures of the Gulf economies, including dependency on hydrocarbon exports, the need for fiscal reforms and alternative sources of state revenue, as well as limited incentives in the status-quo for initiative and productive activities. However, diversification, business development and transition away from hydrocarbon dependency require the capacity to make informed and strategic long-term choices, based on not only on existing strengths and competitive advantages within the current global landscape, but taking into account foreseeable needs and future developments. These include both regional or domestic developments and the likelihood of major shocks in global economic landscapes. It has been observed that major restructuring of economies was made possible historically through state intervention (Wade, 2004). States clearly have a privileged position for enabling change, since they can provide necessary infrastructure and create a stable climate that supports investment, allowing businesses to operate with a minimum of risk. Clear and credible visions for the future are a vital condition for long term investments in the domestic economies, while excessive regulations, clientelism and the fear of political upheavals can act as deterrents. In the case of the Gulf states, the question is thus how to develop wise policies and mechanisms, by identifying critical points of leverage rather than using blanket measures.To avoid defensive reactions or flight of capital and capacity, visions for domestic development need to generate confidence and trust, giving sufficient attention to mechanisms of enabling change that simultaneously permit a smooth phasing out of dysfunctional structures. Major challenges observed today include the demographic profile of the countries, expectations as well as the mismatch between existing skills of the labour force and the capacity needed for restructuring the economies. Maintaining a social contract will therefore continue to depend on measures of distribution and ensuring employment for young people in the region, while at the same time orienting the economy towards new types of production.The paper will consider possible pathways towards economic sustainability in the Gulf states drawing on systems and transition theory (Geels, 2005; Twomey & Gaziulusoy, 2014). In the context of the Gulf, it has been argued that conventional distinctions between private and public sectors can be misleading, to the extent that public actors can be stakeholders in the economy. In the analysis, emphasis will therefore be on implications of policy choices for the real economy and future capacity, rather than on public versus private ownership. The analysis will further outline the heterogeneity of the economic fabric and discuss both synergies and conflicts of interest between different sectors and industries.

  • 5.
    Avery, Helen
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Learning Practices inside and outside School (LPS), Sustainability Education Research (SER). Centre for Advanced Middle Eastern Studies, Lund University, Sweden.
    Strandliv2020In: Dragomanen: 22/2020: Fritid / [ed] A. Ackfeldt & L. Stenberg, Svenska Forskningsinstitutet i Istanbul och Föreningen Svenska Istanbulinstitutets vänner , 2020Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The beach is the main accessible public space for the inhabitants of Gaza, and plays a central role for leisure time and recreation. However, the water is contaminated and dangerous for bathing, which reflects the major issues Gaza faces with wastewater treatment and adequate infrastructure.

  • 6.
    Avery, Helen
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Learning Practices inside and outside School (LPS), Sustainability Education Research (SER). Centre for Middle Eastern Studies and Centre for Environmental and Climate Research, Lund University, Lund, Sweden; Department of Languages, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Linnaeus University, Kalmar, Sweden.
    Nordén, Birgitta
    Department of Science, Mathematics and Society, Faculty of Education and Society, Malmö University, Malmö, Sweden.
    We Can Only Do It Together: Addressing Global Sustainability Challenges Through a Collaborative Paradigm2021In: Universities, Sustainability and Society: Supporting the Implementation of the Sustainable Development Goals / [ed] W. Leal Filho, A. L. Salvia, L. Brandli, U. M. Azeiteiro & R. Pretorius, Springer, 2021Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 7.
    Butros, Simon
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Global Studies. Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, School Based Research, Sustainable Development and Science education.
    Lager, Tim
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Global Studies. Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, School Based Research, Sustainable Development and Science education.
    Plussummespela hela vägen till hållbar utveckling – En studie om ”Europas grönaste stad”: Hur Internationella samarbeten driver hållbar utveckling framåt i staden. 2018Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The environmental threat is a stressing concern which must be addressed immediately. The urbanization has been growing in a rapid pace the past years. Today, more than 50 percent of the world’s population lives in cities, and the forecast tells us that it will increase to 70 percent in 2050. This puts pressure on actors like states, organizations, companies, and municipalities who must work to meet the urbanization immediately. The UN, the EU and WWF amongst others advocates that international cooperation between these actors is the best way to go, and that cities must be prepared for the problem that occurs today and the challenges for tomorrow. In spite of this, there is no substantial research on this topic, on what international environmental cooperation between cities could mean to a city or what the results could be. Växjö is one of few Swedish cities who work internationally with local as well as global ecological sustainable development. This study intends to discover the international cooperations in the topic of environmental sustainable development in the city in Växjö. The purpose is to see what impact the international cooperations have in the environmental work of Växjö, and to see whether environmental sustainable development is being urged on by international collaborations. By using a positive–sum game as a theoretical starting point, a case–study has been conducted, where interviews were made with representatives from Växjö municipal. The result of the study shows that the effects Växjö has obtained through these cooperations, do promote environmental sustainable development. If the collaborations take the form of a positive–sum game, all actors benefit from it and the environment as well. Since the international cooperations bring exchange of knowledge and sometimes external financial means to put into different projects, the city’s environmental sustainable development improves.

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    Plussummespela hela vägen till hållbar utveckling – En studie om ”Europas grönaste stad”: Hur Internationella samarbeten driver hållbar utveckling framåt i staden.
  • 8.
    Cornelissen, Johannes H. C.
    et al.
    Vrije Universiteit.
    Van Bodegom, Peter M.
    Vrije Universiteit.
    Aerts, Rien
    Vrije Universiteit.
    Callaghan, Terry V.
    University of Sheffield.
    Van Logtestijn, Richard S. P.
    Vrije Universiteit.
    Alatalo, Juha
    VINNOVA.
    Chapin, Stuart F.
    University of Alaska.
    Gerdol, Renato G.
    Università degli Studi di Ferrara Dipartimento delle Risorse Naturali e Cultural.
    Gudmundsson, Jon
    Agricultural University of Iceland.
    Gwynn-Jones, Dylan
    University of Wales.
    Hartley, Anne E.
    Florida International University.
    Hik, David S.
    University of Alberta.
    Hofgaard, Annika
    Norwegian Institute for Nature Research.
    Jónsdóttir, Ingibjörg S.
    Agricultural University of Iceland.
    Karlsson, Staffan
    Vetenskapsrådet.
    Klein, Julia A.
    Colorado State University.
    Laundre, Jim
    Marine Biological Labratory.
    Magnusson, Borgthor
    Icelandic Institute of Natural History.
    Michelsen, Anders
    University of Copenhagen.
    Molau, Ulf
    Göteborgs Universitet.
    Onipchenko, Vladimir G.
    Moscow State University.
    Quested, Helen M.
    Stockholms Universitet.
    Sandvik, Sylvi M.
    Agder University College.
    Schmidt, Inger K.
    Royal Veterinary and Agricultural University Denmark.
    Shaver, Gus R.
    Marine Biological Labratory.
    Solheim, Bjørn S.
    University of Tromsø.
    Soudzilovskaia, Nadejda A.
    Vrije Universiteit, Moscow State University.
    Stenström, Anna
    Länsstyrelsen Västra Götaland.
    Tolvanen, Anne
    Finnish Forest Research Institute.
    Totland, Ørjan T.
    Norwegian University of Life Sciences.
    Wada, Naoya W.
    University of Toyama.
    Welker, Jeffrey M.
    University of Alaska Anchorage.
    Zhao, Xinquan
    Chinese Academy of Sciences.
    Brancaleoni, Lisa
    Brancaleoni, Laura
    De Beus, Miranda A. H.
    Cooper, Elisabeth J.
    Dalen, Linda
    Harte, John
    Hobbie, Sarah E.
    Hoefsloot, Gerlof
    Jägerbrand, Annika K.
    Göteborg University.
    Jonasson, Sven
    Lee, John A.
    Lindblad, Karin
    Melillo, Jerry M.
    Neill, Christopher
    Press, Malcolm C.
    Rozema, Jelte
    Zielke, Matthias
    Global negative vegetation feedback to climate warming responses of leaf litter decomposition rates in cold biomes2007In: Ecology Letters, ISSN 1461-023X, E-ISSN 1461-0248, Vol. 10, no 7, p. 619-627Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Whether climate change will turn cold biomes from large long-term carbon sinks into sources is hotly debated because of the great potential for ecosystem-mediated feedbacks to global climate. Critical are the direction, magnitude and generality of climate responses of plant litter decomposition. Here, we present the first quantitative analysis of the major climate-change-related drivers of litter decomposition rates in cold northern biomes worldwide.

    Leaf litters collected from the predominant species in 33 global change manipulation experiments in circum-arctic-alpine ecosystems were incubated simultaneously in two contrasting arctic life zones. We demonstrate that longer-term, large-scale changes to leaf litter decomposition will be driven primarily by both direct warming effects and concomitant shifts in plant growth form composition, with a much smaller role for changes in litter quality within species. Specifically, the ongoing warming-induced expansion of shrubs with recalcitrant leaf litter across cold biomes would constitute a negative feedback to global warming. Depending on the strength of other (previously reported) positive feedbacks of shrub expansion on soil carbon turnover, this may partly counteract direct warming enhancement of litter decomposition.

  • 9.
    Eckert, Andreas
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Chemical Engineering. Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Disciplinary Research.
    Fransson, Cecilia
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Disciplinary Research. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Chemical Engineering.
    Avena Sativa - En hyperackumulator?: En studie av havres kadmiumupptag2009Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of our research was to investigate if oat is capable of extracting cadmium to such extent that it is usable in decontaminating polluted soils. We grew oat in a hydroponic culture during 28 days in a controlled environment and a total of 30 plants were used. The nutrient solutions were contaminated with cadmium of ten different concentrations after seven days. After harvesting the plants, the roots were separated from the shoots, placed in separate containers and then turned to ashes. The cadmium content was measured three times per sample in an atomic absorption spectrometer.

    Our results indicate that the ability of oat to extract cadmium from a solution is linearly dependent of the cadmium concentration of the solution. We also noted that the resistivity to cadmium of oat is limited. When the concentration of accessible cadmium ions exceeded 0,06mM, a significant difference of the shoot growth appeared. The results we obtained from shoots and roots show cadmium amounts much higher in the roots than the shoots. Despite this difference there were sufficient amounts of cadmium in the shoots to call oat a hyper accumulator. This means that oat fulfills one of the criteria of a phytoextractor.

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    FULLTEXT01
  • 10.
    Eklund, Axel
    et al.
    Jönköping University.
    Nilsson, Martin
    Jönköping University.
    Miljöledningssystem: En förberedande fallstudie för ISO 14001 certifiering2021Independent thesis Basic level (university diploma), 180 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Climate change has become a subject that is frequently reported in the media. There is an increased awareness and interest among consumers about environmental issues. Therefore, companies try to adapt their business to work in a more sustainable way. The ISO 14001 standard is a helpful tool to structure an environmental management system. It is an established framework on how companies can continuously improve their business to minimize the climate footprint. 

     

    This report is based on a company that aims to become certified according to ISO 14001. The company is ISO 9001 certified, and several areas are addressed in both standards, which is beneficial for the implementation of their environmental management system according to ISO 14001. The goal off this study is to prepare the company by identifying gaps in their current environmental management system compared to the ISO 14001 requirements. 

     

    The GAP-analysis determined the significance of the gap, by dividing gaps in three categories: Minor, Major and Critical. The result showed that almost half of the requirements is considered as minor gaps, which means that the company with minor actions can meet the requirements. The other half is categorized as major and critical gaps, which will need significant actions and resources to meet the requirements. The result from the GAP-analysis shows that the company, due to the similarities between ISO 14001 and ISO 9001, have a good potential to meet the requirements. To start their certification process, the study presents 18 actions based on the result from the gap-analysis for the company to consider.

     

    The purpose of ISO 14001 is not only for a company to get a certificate, but also to continuously improve their environmental management system. Therefore, the company must develop and increase their knowledge of the standard to fully understand it and there by fulfill its purpose.  

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    fulltext
  • 11.
    Elias, Marcelo
    et al.
    Univ Sao Paulo, Sch Econ Business Adm & Accounting, Av Bandeirantes 3900, BR-14040905 Ribeirao Preto, SP, Brazil..
    Liboni, Lara Bartocci
    Univ Sao Paulo, Sch Econ Business Adm & Accounting, Av Bandeirantes 3900, BR-14040905 Ribeirao Preto, SP, Brazil.;Western Univ Canada, Kings Coll, 266 Epworth Ave, London, ON N6A 2M3, Canada..
    Cezarino, Luciana O.
    Ca Foscari Univ Venice, Dept Management, Cannaregio 873, I-30123 Venice, Italy..
    Martins, Flavio Pinheiro
    Univ Sao Paulo, Sch Econ Business Adm & Accounting, Av Bandeirantes 3900, BR-14040905 Ribeirao Preto, SP, Brazil..
    Pimenta, Marcio Lopes
    Univ Fed Uberlandia, Business & Management Coll, Av Joao Naves de Avila 2121, BR-38408100 Uberlandia, MG, Brazil..
    Hilletofth, Per
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design. Univ Gavle, Dept Ind Engn & Management, SE-80176 Gavle, Sweden..
    Hilmola, Olli-Pekka
    LUT Univ, Kouvola Unit, Tykkitie 1, FIN-45100 Kouvola, Finland.;Tallinn Univ Technol Taltech, Estonian Maritime Acad, Kopli 101, EE-11712 Tallinn, Estonia..
    Shedding Light on the Brazilian Amazon Biotrade: A Study on Sustainable Development in Native Communities2022In: Sustainability, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 14, no 19, article id 12826Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Amazon is a biodiversity hotspot. Around 90% of its territory is inhabited by native communities, who spontaneously organize themselves into groups of extractivists and small producers, relying on biodiversity as their primary means of sustenance. This paper aims to discuss how the biotrade of Amazonian biodiversity goods affects native communities with respect to environmental, social, and economic sustainability. Based on a sample of 178 native extractivists in four communities, we concluded that biotrade enabled native communities to market their products by adapting to existing conditions, considering the difficulties and the expectations of traditional residents, and contributed to the three dimensions of sustainable development.

  • 12.
    Hammarsten, Maria
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Sustainable Societies (SUS), Sustainability Education Research (SER).
    Skogsträdgårdsvistelser ur barns perspektiv – Speglat under samtalspromenader2022Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The licentiate thesis examines what spending time in a forest garden can offer children when this environment is used for teaching aimed at sustainability. What do the children remember from their visits to the forest garden? What do they find special or memorable? What can the children learn there? To answer such questions, walk-and-talk conversations were conducted with children who for a three-year period had regularly visited a forest garden during school hours.

    The overall purpose of the licentiate thesis is to deepen knowledge about what spending time in a forest garden in a school context can offer children, reflected from the children's perspectives. Furthermore, the thesis aims to deepen knowledge about walk-and-talk conversations as a data collection method when children are respondents. This leads to the research questions:

    1. In what ways can walk-and-talk conversations as a data collection method reflect children's perspectives in an environment and in relation to places? What are the possibilities and limitations of the method?

    2. What significance do forest garden visits in a pedagogical context aimed at learning for sustainability have from the children's perspective?

    The theoretical starting points of the licentiate thesis draw on social studies of childhood, ecological literacy and affordances. Another concept that emerged in the analysis process was plant blindness. Data consisted of audio-recorded walk-and-talk conversations, children's photographs and recorded informal, supplementary interviews. A total of 28 children (11 boys and 17 girls) participated in sub-studies II and III. The children were aged 7-9 years, but most were 9 years old.

    The licentiate thesis consists of three sub-studies:

    Sub-study I is a literature review that focuses on opportunities, limitations, and challenges in using walk-and-talk conversations as a data collection method with children and young people. Walk-and-talk conversations can increase opportunities to capture children's perspectives and help to reduce power imbalances between children and researchers. However, analysing data from child-led walks and conversations can be challenging, while awareness of the researcher's own position and assumptions becomes particularly important.

    Sub-study II deals with the forest garden from children’s perspective. The first category, ‘to appreciate the place the forest garden’, contained the following themes: physical work, relationships with animals and plants, aesthetic and edible aspects and food, and friends. Most of the children enjoyed staying in the forest garden with its natural features. They valued the care of living organisms and felt that spending time in the forest garden was fun and exciting. In the second category, ‘aspects of learning in the forest garden’, the following themes emerged; practical skills, coexistence and caring, and biological knowledge and ecological understanding.

    Sub-study III deals with the four most photographed phenomena in the forest garden. The first were the plants, including trees and shrubs, which provided sensual, aesthetic and emotional affordances. The second was the pond, which provided physical affordances and wishes, while the third, the barbecue area, provided social affordances. Finally, the tipi provided affordances for privacy and imagination.

    To conclude: children's forest garden visits, with learning and nature encounters, can contribute to sustainable development. The investigated forest garden was an outdoor environment designed for children with natural features and with a focus on organic farming, where the forest garden educators helped to create a framework for both learning and relational opportunities. Developing ecological literacy in the new generation is a crucial concern, and the results of the licentiate thesis suggest that establishing educational outdoor environments where children receive parts of their education can contribute to the development of such literacy. The creation of outdoor environments for children is thus an important sustainability issue.

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  • 13.
    Hörth, Jan
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    Leiditz Thorsson, Erik
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
    Does Sustainable Behaviour make you a Sustainable Investor?: A quantitative study on Sustainable Investments in relation to one’s Ecological Footprint.2022Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Background and Problem: Global climate change presents the biggest challenge humanity has ever faced. As the Ecological Footprint metric and behaviour towards sustainable investment can present essential contributions to humanity’s sustainability transition, they have gained significant importance over the last years. However, it is largely unexplored if living and consuming sustainably also affects how savings are allocated when investing. 

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to contribute to the current body of knowledge by studying the motivations and backgrounds that drive the decision of individuals to invest sustainably. Thus, we investigate the relationship between people’s Ecological Footprint and their sustainable investment behaviour.

    Method: This study follows a positivist research approach where quantitative data is gathered through a structured questionnaire from 290 respondents with financial literacy and sustainability awareness. The results are analysed through a logistic regression and then interpreted and discussed in the context of the frame of reference. 

    Conclusion: The results indicate that individuals with a lower Ecological Footprint and thus a higher awareness of sustainability are more likely to invest sustainably. Consequently, this study showed that individuals who consumed more sustainably tend to act more sustainably in other areas and levels. Moreover, this study adds new knowledge to the literature regarding individual’s consumption behaviour and its relationship with sustainable investments. 

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  • 14. Idoia Biurrun, Idoia
    et al.
    Burrascano, Sabina
    Dembicz, Iwona
    Guarino, Riccardo
    Kapfer, Jutta
    Pielech, Remigiusz
    Garcia-Mijangos, Itziar
    Wagner, Viktoria
    Palpurina, Salza
    Mimet, Anne
    Pellissier, Vincent
    Marcenò, Corrado
    Nowak, Arkadiusz
    Bergamini, Ariel
    Boch, Steffen
    Csergő, Anna Mária
    Grytnes, John-Arvid
    Campos, Juan Antonio
    Erschbamer, Brigitta
    Jiménez-Alfaro, Borja
    Kącki, Zygmunt
    Kuzemko, Anna
    Manthey, Michael
    van Meerbeek, Koenraad
    Swacha, Grzegorz
    Afif, Elias
    Alatalo, Juha M.
    Aleffi, Michele
    Babbi, Manuel
    Bátori, Zoltán
    Belonovskaya, Elena
    Berg, Christian
    Bhatta, Kuber Prasad
    Cancellieri, Laura
    Ceulemans, Tobias
    Deák, Balázs
    Demeter, László
    Deng, Lei
    Doležal, Jiří
    Dolnik, Christian
    Dramstad, Wenche
    Dřevojan, Pavel
    Ecker, Klaus
    Essl, Franz
    Etzold, Jonathan
    Filibeck, Goffredo
    Fjellstad, Wendy
    Güler, Behlül
    Hájek, Michal
    Hepenstrick, Daniel
    Hodgson, John G.
    Honrado, João P.
    Jägerbrand, Annika K.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Civil Engineering and Lighting Science.
    Janišová, Monika
    Jeanneret, Philippe
    Kelemen, András
    Kirschner, Philipp
    Klichowska, Ewelina
    Kolomiiets, Ganna
    Kozub, Łukasz
    Lepš, Jan
    Lindborg, Regina
    Löbel, Swantje
    Lomba, Angela
    Magnes, Martin
    Mayrhofer, Helmut
    Malicki, Marek
    Mašić, Ermin
    Meier, Eliane S.
    Mirin, Denis
    Molau, Ulf
    Moysiyenko, Ivan
    Naqinezhad, Alireza
    Ninot, Josep M.
    Nobis, Marcin
    Pedersen, Christian
    Pérez-Haase, Aaron
    Peters, Jan
    Pladevall-Izard, Eulàlia
    Roleček, Jan
    Ronkin, Vladimir
    Savchenko, Galina
    Shyriaieva, Dariia
    Sickel, Hanne
    Stevens, Carly
    Świerszcz, Sebastian
    Tölgyesi, Csaba
    Tsarevskaya, Nadezda
    Valkó, Orsolya
    Van Mechelen, Carmen
    Vashenyak, Iuliia
    Vetaas, Ole Reidar
    Vynokurov, Denys
    Waldén, Emelie
    Widmer, Stefan
    Wolfrum, Sebastian
    Wróbel, Anna
    Zlotnikova, Ekaterina
    Dengler, Jürgen
    GrassPlot v. 2.00 – first update on the database of multi-scale plant diversity in Palaearctic grasslands2019In: Palaearctic Grasslands, ISSN 2627-9827, no 44, p. 26-47Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    GrassPlot is a collaborative vegetation-plot database organised by the Eurasian Dry Grassland Group (EDGG) and listed in the Global Index of Vegetation-Plot Databases (GIVD ID EU-00-003). Following a previous Long Database Report (Dengler et al. 2018, Phytocoenologia 48, 331–347), we provide here the first update on content and functionality of GrassPlot. The current version (GrassPlot v. 2.00) contains a total of 190,673 plots of different grain sizes across 28,171 independent plots, with 4,654 nested-plot series including at least four grain sizes. The database has improved its content as well as its functionality, including addition and harmonization of header data (land use, information on nestedness, structure and ecology) and preparation of species composition data. Currently, GrassPlot data are intensively used for broad-scale analyses of different aspects of alpha and beta diversity in grassland ecosystems.

  • 15.
    Ismail, Khadra
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication.
    ”Människan är det farligaste djuret”: Elevers uppfattningar om miljöproblem och framtiden2019Independent thesis Advanced level (professional degree), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this empirical study is to illustrate how 10 students in grade five perceive environmental problems and the future. The study has applied the qualitative method focus groups and clarifies the concept of sustainable development and global initiatives in sustainable development. The study has also highlighted sustainable development in the Swedish curriculum along with previous research on students' perceptions about sustainable development, environmental problems and the future. The result indicates that the students have knowledge of various kinds of environmental problems. However, littering was the most discussed environmental problem by the students. The students perceived contrarily about the future. The majority of students perceived a horrible future with destructive consequences. A few students had better expectations about the future and believed that nations would cooperate on international laws for a greater future. Lastly, the students discussed how the society should work to create a sustainable planet.

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  • 16.
    Johansson, Sara
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Global Studies.
    Lövgren, Klara
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Global Studies.
    Miljö- och klimaträttvisa: på kommuners “gröna agendor”?: Svenska kommuners strategiska arbete med att mitigera klimatförändringar2023Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Climate change is one of the main challenges of the 21st century, and states are coming together intending to mitigate its causes and consequences. Through agreements, agendas and declarations, states aim towards green economies to prevent further disruptions within the climate system. Furthermore, the transition work to reduce greenhouse gas emissions has trickled down to a municipal level, as their local expertise and ability to operate at a grassroots level is vital to the transitional work. Scholars have highlighted the importance of making the transition based on aspects of justice, even though the definition of a just transition is unclear within the field. Therefore, this study aims to investigate how and if environmental and climate justice are occurring in Swedish municipalities' strategies towards climate change mitigation. To do so, available strategic documentation of four top-rated sustainability and climate-aware municipalities in Sweden has been analyzed and interpreted. Through the lens of JUST-framework, representing principles of environmental and climate justice, the results reveal that while justice is not a central point in these strategies, elements of justice are relatively present. The findings indicate that the municipalities' differences and circumstances affect their strategic work with climate change mitigation and whether justice is occurring.

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  • 17.
    Jägerbrand, Annika K.
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Civil Engineering and Lighting Science. Calluna AB, Nacka, Sweden.
    Brutemark, A.
    Calluna AB, Nacka, Sweden.
    Barthel Svedén, J.
    Calluna AB, Nacka, Sweden.
    Gren, I. -M
    Department of Economics, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala, Sweden.
    A review on the environmental impacts of shipping on aquatic and nearshore ecosystems2019In: Science of the Total Environment, ISSN 0048-9697, E-ISSN 1879-1026, Vol. 695, article id 133637Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There are several environmental and ecological effects of shipping. However, these are rarely assessed in total in the scientific literature. Thus, the aim of this study was to summarize the different impacts of water-based transport on aquatic and nearshore ecosystems and to identify knowledge gaps and areas for future research. The review identified several environmental and ecological consequences within the main impact categories of water discharges, physical impacts, and air emissions. However, although quantitative data on these consequences are generally scarce the shipping contribution to acidification by SOx- and NOx-emissions has been quantified to some extent. There are several knowledge gaps regarding the ecological consequences of, for example, the increasing amount of chemicals transported on water, the spread of non-indigenous species coupled with climate change, and physical impacts such as shipping noise and artificial light. The whole plethora of environmental consequences, as well as potential synergistic effects, should be seriously considered in transport planning.

  • 18.
    Kall, Ann-Sofi
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Learning Practices inside and outside School (LPS), Sustainability Education Research (SER).
    Ford, Rebecca
    e University of the Highlands and Islands, Inverness, Scotland.
    Schick, Lea
    IT University of Copenhagen, Denmark.
    The power of stories2021In: Energy worlds in experiment / [ed] J. Maguire, L. Watts & B. R. Winthereik, Manchester, UK: Mattering Press , 2021, p. 34-65Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    From the introduction: Stories have power: power to communicate, gather, entertain and educate; power to seduce and enchant, convince and transform both people and societies. Energy infrastructures are filled with stories, stories that have many kinds of power. This chapter is about the different powers to be found in stories of infrastructures, from waste incinerators, to marine energy, to nuclear power. And it asks: What do these stories of energy infrastructure have the power to do? In this chapter, we tell stories about energy infrastructures, and through these we investigate how energy and power are inevitably entangled in one another. Rather than telling one powerful story, we will do this by weaving together a collection of six short stories, each situated in a particular time and place. These stories demonstrate the diversity and versatility in energy infrastructures, as well as in storytelling practices.

  • 19.
    Kemi, Moa
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication.
    Svensk, Isabell
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication.
    What is the future? It is not in our hands: Women's realities of living in the southwest coastal region of Bangladesh in the context of environmental challenges2022Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Bangladesh is known as one of the most climate-vulnerable countries in the world, especially the southwest coastal region. This area frequently experiences extreme weather such as cyclones, storms, waterlogging, droughts, and high levels of salinity. These events are projected to intensify further with climate change. Moreover, scholars have emphasized that women in Bangladesh bear the heaviest burden from environmental challenges in terms of vulnerability, exposure, and adaptation. This study aims to illustrate the reality and everyday life of emotions and thoughts of women living under these kinds of circumstances. To do so, 10 semi-structured interviews were conducted with women living in three different villages in the southwest coastal region of Bangladesh. The purpose investigates how environmental challenges affect women living in this region in terms of health, mobility, livelihood, and social- and economic security. In addition, this study explores how these women look at the future as well as how they live their everyday life in an area affected by environmental challenges. The ambition was not to find comparable answers, rather to illustrate a variety of women’s realities and challenges. The gathered material was analyzed through previous research and the theoretical frameworks of IPCC’s Conception of Risk and Feminist Political Ecology (FPE).     The results show that women are affected in several ways by environmental challenges because of socially constructed gender roles that are governed by patriarchal principles in the society of Bangladesh. These principles further state the positioning of women and that they hold reproductive-, domestic-, and productive roles that further enhance their vulnerability, exposure, as well as ability to cope and adapt to environmental challenges. Moreover, geographical location and poverty are also two key factors that play a crucial part in how women experience environmental challenges and ability to cope and adapt to these. 

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  • 20.
    Khan, M.
    et al.
    Department of Biological Sciences, Quaid I Azam University, Islamabad, Pakistan.
    Omer, Talha
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Statistics.
    Ellahi, A.
    Department of Community Medicine, Wah Medical College, National University of Medical Sciences, Rawalpindi, Pakistan.
    Ur Rahman, Z.
    Key Laboratory of Digital Earth Science, Aerospace Information Research Institute, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China.
    Niaz, R.
    Department of Statistics, Quaid-I-Azam University, Islamabad, Pakistan.
    Ahmad Lone, S.
    Department of Basic Sciences, College of Science and Theoretical Studies, Saudi Electronic University, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia.
    Monitoring and assessment of heavy metal contamination in surface water of selected rivers2023In: Geocarto International, ISSN 1010-6049, E-ISSN 1752-0762, Vol. 38, no 1, article id 2256313Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The current research aimed to monitor and assess the heavy metal contamination in the surface water of 53 sampling sites along the selected rivers using principal component analysis and cluster analysis. For this purpose, both physiochemical parameters such as the temperature (T), the potential of hydrogen (pH), total dissolved solids (TDS) and electroconductivity (EC), and heavy metals such as iron (Fe), chromium (Cr), nickel (Ni), cadmium (Cd), lead (Pb) and arsenic (As) are analyzed as potential water contaminants. The average values of pH, TDS, EC and T are found at 7.75, 70.89 mg/L, 139.11 µs/cm and 20.29 °C, respectively, and heavy metals including Cr, Ni, Cd, Pb, As and Fe are observed at 0.04, 0.04, 0.04, 0.03, 0.001 and 0.04 mg/L, respectively. Moreover, it is found that in both rivers hazardous metals, including Cr (100%), Cd (92.30%), Pb (100%), Ni (100%) and Fe (91%), exceed the permissible limits of the WHO.

  • 21.
    Li, Yuheng
    et al.
    Institute of Geographic Sciences and Natural Resources Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China.
    Li, Yurui
    Institute of Geographic Sciences and Natural Resources Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China.
    Westlund, Hans
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics. Department of Urban Planning and Environment, School of Architecture and Built Environment, KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Liu, Yansui
    College of Resources Science and Technology, Beijing Normal University, Beijing, China.
    Urban-rural transformation in relation to cultivated land conversion in China: Implications for optimizing land use and balanced regional development2015In: Land use policy, ISSN 0264-8377, E-ISSN 1873-5754, Vol. 47, p. 218-224Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The paper aims to investigate land conversion as a result of urban-rural transformation in the Chinese context. Theoretical analysis and empirical study of the Bohai Rim region find strong connections between the land conversion rates and urban-rural transformation intensity in the period 2000-2010. Rapid land conversion normally takes place in counties/districts of low initial level of urban-rural transformation. However, places of high initial socioeconomic level and low transformation intensity would experience slow land conversion. The different land conversion rates in relation to urban-rural transformation intensity are mainly attributed to the China's land quotas distribution system which is subjective and administrative. The study highlights the implementation of land quotas distribution system based on differences to improve the land distribution efficiency and achieve balanced regional development in China. (C) 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • 22.
    Marcheschi, Elizabeth
    et al.
    Lund University.
    Johansson, Maria
    Brunt, David
    Laike, Thorbjörn
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering.
    Physical-Environment Qualities Of Supported-Housing Facilities For People With Severe Mental Illness2014In: Journal of Architectural and Planning Research, ISSN 0738-0895, Vol. 31, no 2, p. 128-142Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The physical environment of supported-housing facilities (SHF) for people with severe mental illness has mainly been investigated in terms of neighborhood quality and community integration, largely neglecting the design of housing attributes. This study investigated whether SHFs with high and low levels of physical-environment quality differed in their support of users' (residents and staff) needs, which were operationalized in terms of perceived visual pleasantness, homelikeness, and positive psychosocial processes. The perception of supportive characteristics in 20 SHFs was assessed by SHF residents (n = 72), SHF staff (n = 117), a user-group panel (n = 3), and environmental psychologists (n = 5). The results showed that SHFs with "high" environmental quality - characterized by features such as clear demarcation between the spaces, suitable facilities, and proximity to green environments - did a better job of supporting users' needs. Users and experts perceived physical-environment qualities in largely the same way The implications of these findings are important for those with severe mental illness, as the findings emphasize the relevance of physical-environment quality in SHFs for users' well-being.

  • 23.
    Marquardt, Jens
    et al.
    Institute of Political Science, Technical University of Darmstadt, Darmstadt, Germany.
    Fast, Cornelia
    Institute for Environmental Studies, Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, Amsterdam, Netherlands.
    Grimm, Julia
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre for Family Entrepreneurship and Ownership (CeFEO).
    Non- and sub-state climate action after Paris: From a facilitative regime to a contested governance landscape2022In: Wiley Interdisciplinary Reviews: Climate Change, ISSN 1757-7780, E-ISSN 1757-7799, Vol. 13, no 5, article id e791Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Paris Agreement marks a significant milestone in international climate politics. With its adoption, Parties call for non- and sub-state actors to contribute to the global climate agenda and close the emissions gap left by states. Such a facilitative setting embraces non-state climate action through joint efforts, synergies, and different modes of collaboration. At the same time, non-state actors have always played a critical and confrontational role in international climate governance. Based on a systematic literature review, we identify and critically assess the role of non-state climate action in a facilitative post-Paris climate governance regime. We thereby highlight three constitutive themes, namely different state-non-state relations, competing level of ambition, and a variety of knowledge foundations. We substantiate these themes, derived from an inductive analysis of existing literature, with illustrative examples and propose three paradigmatic non-state actor roles in post-Paris climate governance on a continuum between compliance and critique. We thereby highlight four particular threats of a facilitative setting, namely substitution of state action, co-optation, tokenism, and depoliticization. Future research should not limit itself to an effective integration of NSSAs into a facilitative climate regime, but also engage with the merits of contestation. This article is categorized under: Policy and Governance > Multilevel and Transnational Climate Change Governance.

  • 24.
    Melin, Daniéla
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication.
    "Nedskräpning förbjuden": Elever på mellanstadiet resonerar kring nedskräpning, källsortering och föroreningar2019Independent thesis Basic level (professional degree), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this qualitative study is, through focus group interviews investigate what pupils in grades 5-6 can and reason about waste sorting, littering and pollutions. The study examines how sustainable development is presented in the curriculum's introductory parts and curricula, how the three dimensions of sustainability are defined and previous research within the subject. The result that emerged visualizes how 20 pupils at an Eco-School and a non-Eco-school look at littering and sorting waste. The results of the survey indicate that the pupils are well acquainted with today's environmental problems, and they know how to counteract with these. The pupils on the Eco School did remarkably not show more knowledge about for example sustainability. However, it is demonstrated that the majority of the pupils at both schools hold a nonchalant approach to the problems, place these on other individuals and postpone the problems before them. Finally, the study discusses the introduction of a new topic in the curriculum, who carries the responsibility and how the teachers can engage their students to work for a better planet.

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  • 25.
    Mourad, Khaldoon A.
    et al.
    Centre for Middle Eastern Studies, Faculty of Social Science, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Avery, Helen
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Learning Practices inside and outside School (LPS), Sustainability Education Research (SER). Centre for Middle Eastern Studies, Faculty of Social Science, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    The sustainability of post-conflict development: The case of Algeria2019In: Sustainability, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 11, no 11, article id 3036Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Algerian civil war, 1992-2002, affected all aspects of life in the country. Major development efforts were therefore initiated in the post-conflict era. Almost 20 years later, the economy remains fragile, and the country's large hydrocarbon revenues have not been used to develop the infrastructure for sustainability, support energy transition or reduce structural vulnerabilities. This paper provides an overview of Algerian development strategies before and after the conflict, examining in particular the orientation of major development projects involving foreign financing. Two rural development programmes are described to illustrate the outcomes of such projects. The results show that the conflict stopped or hindered many ongoing and planned development projects in the country, especially in the agriculture sector, while new investments in industry started after the conflict. The review of individual development projects further revealed that many projects between 1980-2017 had doubtful benefits with respect to long-term development goals. Initiatives tended to be discontinued once the funding period closed, and the involvement of the private sector was low. It is therefore concluded that additional attention needs to be devoted to long-term and structural impacts of development projects, including considerations regarding sustainability, demographics, and climate-related future changes. 

  • 26.
    Mourad, Khaldoon A.
    et al.
    The Centre for Sustainable Visions, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Hosseini, Seyyed H.
    Centre for Advanced Middle Eastern Studies, Lund University, Lund, Sweden; Division of Water Resources Engineering, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Avery, Helen
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Learning Practices inside and outside School (LPS), Sustainability Education Research (SER). Centre for Advanced Middle Eastern Studies, Lund University, Lund, Sweden; Centre for Environmental and Climate Research, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    The role of citizen science in sustainable agriculture2020In: Sustainability, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 12, no 24, article id 10375Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Farmers know much more than we think, and they are keen to improve their knowledge in order to improve their farms and increase their income. On the other hand, decision-makers, organizations, and researchers are increasing their use of citizen volunteers to strengthen their outcomes, enhance project implementation, and approach ecosystem sustainability. This paper assesses the role of citizen science relating to agricultural practices and covers citizen science literature on agriculture and farmers’ participation during the period 2007–2019. The literature was examined for the role of citizen science in supporting sustainable agriculture activities, pointing to opportunities, challenges, and recommendations. The study identified the following gaps: insufficient attention to (1) long-term capacity building and dialogue between academics and farming communities; (2) developing countries in the global South and smallholders; (3) agriculture trading and marketing; (4) the rationales of selecting target groups; (5) contributing to accelerated sustainability transitions. The main aim of the research projects reviewed in this study tended to focus on the research outcomes from an academic perspective, not sustainable solutions in practice or sustainability in general. More research is needed to address these gaps and to widen the benefits of citizen science in sustainable agricultural practices. 

  • 27.
    Nordén, Birgitta
    et al.
    Malmö University, Sweden.
    Avery, Helen
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Learning Practices inside and outside School (LPS), Sustainability Education Research (SER). Centre for Middle Eastern Studies, Lund University, Sweden.
    Transitions towards an unknown future: Non-formal learning in transnational communities for a sustainable society2019Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The study makes an inventory of learning opportunities young people were offered in connection with CEI 2016, one of the annual international conferences organized by the NGO named Caretakers of the Environment International (CEI), which year 2016 took place in Aalborg in Denmark. The learning opportunities offered by this transnational learning community are discussed in relation to some essential learning qualities to meet the comprehensive sustainability challenges facing our societies - in particular youth, who can be seen as a target group per se, many times in transition-like situations: (1) learning for uncertain future, 82) dealing with complex crossborder issues, (3) ability to collaborate, (4) take initiative and act in society. These qualities are difficult to achieve in formal school systems that are essentially organized to ensure the transmission of a specific learning content and measurable abilities. The question in this study has been inspired by a previous study in a Swedish school context (Nordén, Avery & Anderberg, 2012, Nordén, 2016), about abilities that allow high school students to get an agency towards local and global sustainability challenges. The critical skills identified were: (1) Organization/self-regulation and independent decision-making skills (2) Development of Transnational Learning Communities (3) Democratic cooperation in action. There is widespread consensus that radical new educational approaches are needed to address the challenges of our time (Breiting & Wickenberg, 2010; Mochizuki & Yarime, 2016; Reid & Scott, 2013). Traditionally, focus has been placed on transmitting an existing knowledge base. The situations we face are changing at a staggering rate, and future developments are characterized by great uncertainty. Barnett (2012) therefore claims that preparation for the unknown should be guiding in education. Young people must not only be able to explore different complex situations, but also be prepared to take initiatives to act, find solutions to major environmental and social problems, and steer up their own learning during their life journey (Almers, 2013; Barrat, Barratt-Hacking, Scott & Talbot, 2006; Öhman, 2008). In this context, one has talked about sustainability literacy (Dawe, Jucker & Martin, 2005). CEI's activities are nonformal (Mocker & Spear, 1982) in the sense that they are organized for the purpose of promoting learning for sustainability and have a well-considered overall structure, but participants can independently define the issues and projects they work with . The transnational learning community could thereby support a challenge-oriented learning (UE4SD, 2015). The results indicate that the processes are supported when young people and their teachers experience a sense of community and having a place in the local-global context. This is done both through intensive work on their own projects prior to the conference, through participation in the physical meetings during the conference and the subsequent network activities in connection with it. In order for society as a whole to take advantage of the potential of non-formal learning, alternative educational approaches need to gain increased recognition and attention. The focus has to be shifted from a narrow performance focus that values isolated results, to reflect more widely on the learning opportunities offered by different forms of education in their entirety.

  • 28.
    Nordén, Birgitta
    et al.
    Malmö University.
    Avery, Helen
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Learning Practices inside and outside School (LPS), Sustainability Education Research (SER). Center for Middle Eastern Studies, Lund University, Sweden.
    Harju, Anne
    Malmö University, Sweden.
    Åkerblom, Annika
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Practices in development: How is meaning, context and motivation created for learning for sustainability in the preschool's educational outdoor activities?2019Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 29.
    Pettersson, Rebecka
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication.
    Power of the people: A study of the community involvement in the TFCA process in Swaziland2013Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Transfrontier Conservation Areas (TFCAs) in southern Africa are often connected with forced resettlement, marginalization and exclusion from the decision-making process of the local community. Therefore this study investigates the level and kind of community involvement in the TFCA process in Swaziland by performing nine semi-structured interviews in five different communities. The results show that the TFCA process in Swaziland is not quite like the situation described in the rest of southern Africa. They demonstrate that although the community projects in Swaziland’s TFCAs might not be completely gender sensitive and still have to develop in terms of their sustainability, they are on the right track. Most communities are autonomous regarding the governance of their development, either through community boards or traditional structures. Additionally, it is obvious that there are a lot of ideas on and possibilities for development in the communities that need to be encouraged.

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    Power of the people - A study of the community involvement in the TFCA process in Swaziland
  • 30.
    Pezic, Nedim
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Civil Engineering and Lighting Science.
    Al-Omari, Saif
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Civil Engineering and Lighting Science.
    Klimatförbättrad betong- eller trästomme i en byggnad: - Vilket alternativ är mest fördelaktigt ur ett livscykelperspektiv2021Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
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    Klimatförbättrad betong- eller trästomme i en byggnad: - Vilket alternativ är mest fördelaktigt ur ett livscykelperspektiv.
  • 31.
    Svahn, Rebecka
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, School Based Research, Sustainable Development and Science education.
    Utomhusvistelsens nöjen, rättigheter och skyldigheter: Kunskap hos elever i årskurs 5 om allemansrätten2018Independent thesis Advanced level (professional degree), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The aim with this survey study is to investigate what knowledge 11-12-year olds have regarding the Swedish right of public access. The study also investigates what can affect the student’s knowledge of the right to public access and if their interest in nature affect their knowledge.

    206 students participated in this study from 7 different schools, all of them are from the southern parts of Sweden. The schools are from different areas of the region represented by big city schools, a suburban school, schools close to a big city and countryside schools. The results show that the pupils enjoy spending time in nature. Nature according to the pupils are forests, lakes and fields. The pupils like to bicycle, hiking and jogging. The pupils had good knowledge of the Swedish right to public access, the parts that the students had least knowledge was about the fishing rights in Sweden’s five largest lakes and if you can use somebody else’s bridge.  The results also show that pupils from the countryside schools have some more knowledge of the Swedish right of public access than pupils from the other schools.

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  • 32.
    Tait, Adam
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication.
    Covid-19-related litter: an underestimated and growing issue: A qualitative study about covid-19-related litter2022Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this study is to find the connection between the covid-19 pandemic and the increased littering in Jönköping municipality. Then, find out what is being done by Jönköping municipality and the municipality's waste company to manage the littering. The study used a qualitative method with semi-structured interviews to answer the research questions. The flexibility and open-ended choice of interviews were necessary considering the interviewee's different professional backgrounds. The topic chosen was essential, as increased knowledge can create the know-how required to prevent similar happenings in the future. The result showed that certain types of litter, such as medical waste and food packaging, had increased during the pandemic in certain places in Jönköping municipality. These certain places are, for example, the main beach in Jönköping city or different parks in the city, where people socialize along with something to eat and drink, hence the littering. Other litter has not seen any noticeable increase during the covid-19 pandemic. The municipality needed to reorganize and prioritize collecting the trash in these areas with an increase in litter, leaving other sites for later. This meant that the waste management system had not been efficient, and these littering changes had surprised the municipality. This study highlights the need for a waste management system that is more capable and efficient in cleaning, including when there is a pandemic or other events that temporarily increase the littering rates in certain areas.

     

    Littering may be a forgotten subject when discussing the covid-19 pandemic, but this study aims to raise its importance and not underestimate its impact on people and nature.

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  • 33.
    Uhrqvist, Ola
    et al.
    Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Linköping University, Sweden.
    Carlsson, Lisa
    Berzeliusskolan, Linköping, Sweden.
    Kall, Ann-Sofi
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Learning Practices inside and outside School (LPS), Sustainability Education Research (SER).
    Asplund, Therese
    Department for Thematic Studies—Environmental Change, Linköping University, Sweden.
    Sustainability Stories to Encounter Competences for Sustainability2021In: Journal of Education for Sustainable Development, ISSN 0973-4082, E-ISSN 0973-4074, Vol. 15, no 1, p. 146-160Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We communicate, relate, educate and make our world meaningful through stories. Stories are integrated in and are a part of every sustainability issue. In this article, we develop the concept of sustainability stories, and how they can be assessed and developed to correspond with the intentions of education for sustainable development (ESD). Literature shows that valued competences such as action competence, systems perspectives, student engagement and critical reflection have difficulties when it comes to informing educational practices in profound ways. In this article, we argue for the use of sustainability stories as an educational strategy to overcome this problem. Here the didactical tool ecolocigal, pluralism, organisations, social, economic and, agents (EPOSEA) aids teachers in enhancing their ESD classroom activities as well as providing a tool for co-producing sustainability stories. We argue for the potential of serious stories in ESD to holistically engage learners in exploring complex issues.

  • 34.
    Ulkhaq, M. M.
    et al.
    Department of Industrial Engineering, Jl. Prof. Soedarto SH, Diponegoro University, Semarang, Tembalang, 50275, Indonesia.
    George Joseph, R. S.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School.
    Students’ attitudes towards campus sustainability: a comparison among three universities in Sweden2023In: Environment, Development and Sustainability, ISSN 1387-585X, E-ISSN 1573-2975Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The role of higher education institutions (HEIs) in promoting and supporting sustainability has outstretched over the past decades as a result of various declarations and commitments related to the need for sustainability in HEI. As a consequence, HEIs tried to achieve campus sustainability by integrating sustainability concept into their projects, partnerships, assessments, programs, curricula, and research. Accordingly, achieving campus sustainability is not feasible without the involvement of students as the biggest stakeholders of HEI. The students have a substantial impact on sustainability by contributing to and supporting campus sustainability. This research aims to compare and analyse the attitudes of students towards campus sustainability in relation to the influence of the university. The research is conducted at three universities in Sweden, which have different environmental management system certification status. A questionnaire-based survey is employed to collect the data from students at these three universities. It aims to investigate the university’s efforts to support sustainability and students’ awareness towards those efforts and also to measure students’ attitudes towards campus sustainability. The (one-way) analysis of variance is then used to investigate whether there is any difference (statistically) among the means of students’ attitudes at these three universities. The result shows that there is a statistically significant difference in these universities. Analysis and discussion are also provided to identify the reasons behind the result. 

  • 35.
    Yacob, Michael
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Construction Engineering and Lighting Science.
    Kälström, Hugo
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Construction Engineering and Lighting Science.
    Koldioxidabsorption av Gröna Väggar: En utredning av växter på fasader2023Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The pressure on current urban ecosystems is an ongoing problem as greenhouse gaseshave a negative impact on the climate but also on people around the world. As manycities are densely populated, it becomes difficult to introduce more greenery into citieswithout taking up a lot of space, for example by building parks. Therefore, vertical plantsystems placed on facades around the city can be a solution to mitigate the effects ofurban warming and help absorb carbon emissions. The aim of the study is to expandthe knowledge of plant façades with respect to carbon dioxide absorption. The studyexamines three key aspects, namely the economics of installation and maintenance, thelong-term sustainability of carbon absorption and the energy-saving potential of greenwall insulation.The different data collection methods used are literature studies and interviews withcontractors. Fytotextile on the modules was the material whose U-value was used forthe energy calculations; these are used by a company in Spain, Terapia Urbana. Theirquotes were also used for financial calculations to see the viability from an economicperspective.The study shows that the most suitable option for using plants on façades is to chooseresistant and fast-growing perennial plants that require little maintenance as these arethe most optimal for use on façades. The plant Flock Fist was recognized as a suitablespecies for implementation on green walls through various surveys and in-depthinterviews, due to its extended lifespan and inherent ease of maintenance. Analysesinvolving economic, energy and sustainability calculations show that the incorporationof green walls is economically unprofitable. However, in terms of sustainability andenergy efficiency, it appears to be a more practical and beneficial solution.The results show that installing plant façades on buildings can reduce energyconsumption and promote sustainability. The results also revealed that a building with400sqm of green façade can absorb the annual CO2 emissions of a building for 25 years.BIM 3 Requirements and Verification - Design projects are compared with this study'scalculation to check the energy consumption. Plant facades can help buildings achievehigher levels in Miljöbyggnad because of the extra insulation. The study concludes that1100 SEK is saved every year with a plant facade due to the reduction of energyconsumption. The results also highlighted that a building with 400sqm of green façadecan absorb the yearly CO2 emissions of a building for 25 years. Plant facades can helpbuildings achieve higher levels in Miljöbyggnad as the extra insulation helps to reduceenergy consumption. The study also shows that the value of buildings with greenfaçades increases by several percentage points each year.The care and maintenance of the plants were important factors for their survival.However, economic factors were limited due to high installation costs and small savingsrelative to the investment. Plant walls can absorb a significant amount of carbondioxide, but the lack of research on their exact capacity was a challenge.Keywords: Carbon dioxide, White Ness, Fytotextile, Green facades, Plant walls.

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