Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Dynamics of alliances in highly integrated supply chain networks
Stockholm School of Economics.
2001 (English)In: International Journal of Logistics: Research and Applications, ISSN 1367-5567, Vol. 4, no 2, 237-256 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Partnerships and alliances are both tools to increase integration in supply chains and effects of increased integration. As a result of alliance, integration in supply chain networks effectiveness and efficiency increase. To develop highly integrated supply chain networks involves investing time, resources and much effort. Therefore, firms often continue and grow within the existing supply chain network rather than choose other alternatives. On the other hand, this also means that the establishment of new alliances is hindered. The gradual changes normally also apply to the dissolution of alliances. Even though the firm seems to leave a specific individual alliance, it might stay on in the same supply chain or still be a part of the firm network in another supply chain. Few radical changes take place. If they do, acquisitions, technological change or strategic alliances between networks are mostly the triggers causing effects on several individual alliances. Over time, as integration increases, supply chain networks become leaner and more tightly connected, and complexity, risk and conflicts rise in the formation and dissolution of alliances. This spiral effect is enhanced by the tendency to imitate the successful supply chains' increasing homogeneity of chains and stronger competition. Thereby the total industry network will be increasingly integrated, which means fewer opportunities to switch and lower flexibility. Most firms are already tied up and the effects more difficult to foresee. To change alliances will be increasingly problematic and costly when both the supply chain and the total industry network are highly integrated. Acquisitions would rise since this might be the only way to break into these integrated supply chains. As a result the number of alternatives decreases and the dynamics of alliances reduced, which in the end forces new waves of radical changes due to "domino" effects.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2001. Vol. 4, no 2, 237-256 p.
National Category
Business Administration
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-31808DOI: 10.1080/13675560110060009OAI: oai:DiVA.org:hj-31808DiVA: diva2:972077
Available from: 2016-09-20 Created: 2016-09-20 Last updated: 2016-09-20Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text

Other links

Publisher's full text

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Hertz, Susanne
Business Administration

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

Altmetric score

Total: 31 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf