Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Open Innovation and Public Policy in Europe
ESADE Business School.
ESADE Business School.
ESADE Business School.
ESADE Business School.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-7986-5423
2011 (English)Report (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Industrial innovation processes are becoming more open. The large, vertically integrated R&D laboratory systems of the 20th century are giving way to more vertically disintegrated networks of innovation that connect numerous companies into ecosystems. Since innovation policy ultimately rests on the activities and initiatives of the private sector, it is vital that policy follows this evolution.

Previous innovation policies relied on large companies to act as the engines of innovation in the EU. While large companies remain quite relevant to innovation within the EU, they themselves report that their processes involve many more SMEs and other contributors outside their own walls. Therefore, innovation policy must also move outside the walls of these large companies and consider the roles of human capital, competition policy, financing, intellectual property, and public data in promoting an environment of open innovation.

In this report, we combine new research and analysis on open innovation with focused interviews of major participants in the European innovation system. The result is a series of recommendations for public policies that could, if implemented, improve the climate for open innovation to take place in the European Union – and thereby improve the competitiveness of the European economy overall. Taken together, these recommendations comprise an informal ‘charter’ for EU open innovation policy. The authors would like to thank Esther Van Zimmeren of the Centre for Intellectual Property Rights (CIR) of the Catholic University of Leuven for her explanation of various aspects of the European patenting system and the role of patent pools and IP clearing houses.

This report was commissioned by ESADE Business School in Barcelona and the Science|Business Innovation Board AISBL. The Board is a Belgian not-for-profit scientific association that commissions original policy research, engages with policymakers and the press, and works generally to improve the climate for innovation in Europe. Its three co-founders are Science|Business, ESADE and INSEAD, with participation and support from Microsoft, BP, SKF and Imperial College London. In addition, Pfizer contributed support for this particular study. Further information is at www.sciencebusiness.net. The Board is grateful to Máire GeogheganQuinn, EU Commissioner for Research, Innovation and Science, for her encouragement and comments on this research.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Brussels: Science|Business , 2011. Vol. 31, no 6, 36 p.1181-1198 p.
National Category
Business Administration
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-31770OAI: oai:DiVA.org:hj-31770DiVA: diva2:970540
Available from: 2016-09-14 Created: 2016-09-14 Last updated: 2016-09-14Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text

Other links

Fulltext

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Lopez-Vega, Henry
Business Administration

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

Total: 205 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf