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Gene-Environment Interplay in Physical, Psychological, and Cognitive Domains in Mid to Late Adulthood: Is APOE a Variability Gene?
Department of Psychology, University of California Riverside, Riverside, CA, USA .
Department of Psychology, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA, USA; Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
Epidemiology, Biostatistics and Bio-demography, Institute of Public Health, University of Southern Denmark, Odense C, Denmark; Department of Clinical Genetics and Department of Clinical Biochemistry and Pharmacology, Odense University Hospital, Odense, Denmark.
Epidemiology, Biostatistics and Bio-demography, Institute of Public Health, University of Southern Denmark, Odense C, Denmark.
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2016 (English)In: Behavior Genetics, ISSN 0001-8244, E-ISSN 1573-3297, Vol. 46, no 1, 4-19 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Despite emerging interest in gene-environment interaction (GxE) effects, there is a dearth of studies evaluating its potential relevance apart from specific hypothesized environments and biometrical variance trends. Using a monozygotic within-pair approach, we evaluated evidence of G×E for body mass index (BMI), depressive symptoms, and cognition (verbal, spatial, attention, working memory, perceptual speed) in twin studies from four countries. We also evaluated whether APOE is a 'variability gene' across these measures and whether it partly represents the 'G' in G×E effects. In all three domains, G×E effects were pervasive across country and gender, with small-to-moderate effects. Age-cohort trends were generally stable for BMI and depressive symptoms; however, they were variable-with both increasing and decreasing age-cohort trends-for different cognitive measures. Results also suggested that APOE may represent a 'variability gene' for depressive symptoms and spatial reasoning, but not for BMI or other cognitive measures. Hence, additional genes are salient beyond APOE.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2016. Vol. 46, no 1, 4-19 p.
Keyword [en]
apoe cognition body mass index functional ability
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Other Social Sciences not elsewhere specified
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URN: urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-29244DOI: 10.1007/s10519-015-9761-3ISI: 000368722300002PubMedID: 26538244ScopusID: 2-s2.0-84946127415Local ID: HHJÅldrandeISOAI: oai:DiVA.org:hj-29244DiVA: diva2:898039
Available from: 2016-01-27 Created: 2016-01-27 Last updated: 2017-01-26Bibliographically approved

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