Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Event related potential and response time give evidence for a physiological reserve in cognitive functioning in relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis
Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-8212-823X
Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
2015 (English)In: Journal of the Neurological Sciences, ISSN 0022-510X, E-ISSN 1878-5883, Vol. 356, no 1-2, p. 107-112Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Cognitive dysfunction is common in multiple sclerosis (MS). Different factors may moderate the degree of cognitive deficit. The aim of the present study was to distinguish different mechanisms for cognitive reserve in relapsing–remitting MS (RRMS). The effects of clinical variables (physical disability, depression), premorbid intelligence (years of education, vocabulary knowledge), visual event-related potentialmeasures (P300) and response time(RT)were studied in RRMS patients (n=71) and healthy subjects (n=89). Patients with high P300 amplitude and short RT had better cognitive performance. This effect was significantly weaker in controls. High P300 and short RT may be physiological markers of a cognitive reserve in RRMS. In contrast, the association between cognitive scores and premorbid intelligence was similar in patients and in control subjects. The effects of physiological reserve and clinical variables were studied in a hierarchical linear regression model of cognitive performance in RRMS. P300 amplitude and RT explained a considerable amount of variance in global cognitive performance (34%, p b 0.001). The effects of P300 and RTwere notmoderated by premorbid intelligence. Physical disability and depression added significantly to explained variance, and the final model accounted for 44%  (p b 0.001) of the variation. We conclude that physiological reserve is the strongest moderator of cognitive impairment in RRMS

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2015. Vol. 356, no 1-2, p. 107-112
Keyword [en]
Multiple sclerosis, cognitive impairment, cognitive reserve, P300, Response time
National Category
Neurology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-28651DOI: 10.1016/j.jns.2015.06.025ISI: 000360950800019PubMedID: 26117361Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-84939251289OAI: oai:DiVA.org:hj-28651DiVA, id: diva2:882803
Available from: 2015-12-15 Created: 2015-12-15 Last updated: 2017-12-01Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text in DiVA

Other links

Publisher's full textPubMedScopus

Authority records BETA

Wahlin, Åke

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Wahlin, Åke
By organisation
HHJ, Institute of GerontologyHHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health
In the same journal
Journal of the Neurological Sciences
Neurology

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

doi
pubmed
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

doi
pubmed
urn-nbn
Total: 113 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf