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Families and family policies in Sweden
Uppsala universitet, Sweden.
Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för tema, Tema Barn. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten..
2014 (English)In: Handbook of Family Policies Across the Globe / [ed] Mihaela Robila, New York: Springer , 2014, 91-107 p.Chapter in book (Other academic)
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Text
Abstract [en]

Sweden is known as a social welfare state, whereby the people who reside in Sweden are entitled to certain public benefits at little or no cost to the individual. Over the past century, Sweden has reshaped its culture, growing from one of the poorest nations in Europe to a flourishing country that others emulate, especially with respect to their family policies. Sweden has developed several foundational family policies that have helped to encourage equality, while establishing a sense of individuality. Sweden has created similar rights for cohabiters/married couples, as well as for same-sex/opposite-sex couples. Parents receive a generous parental leave package, flexible employment choices, and there is a low gender wage gap, while children receive high-quality childcare, free health care, free dental care, free mental health services, and a substantial child welfare program. Swedish family policies encourage both parents to work and to help each other with household and childcare tasks. Despite the public benefits that Sweden provides for mothers, fathers, and children, there is still a need for further improvements regarding policies on domestic violence, poverty, and child welfare. Assessments of Sweden’s family policies are discussed.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
New York: Springer , 2014. 91-107 p.
Keyword [en]
Sweden, family policy, parental leave, marriage, family-work balance, child welfare, families at risk
National Category
Sociology (excluding Social Work, Social Psychology and Social Anthropology)
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-28551DOI: 10.1007/978-1-4614-6771-7_7ISBN: 978-1-4614-6770-0 (print)ISBN: 978-1-4614-6771-7 (print)OAI: oai:DiVA.org:hj-28551DiVA: diva2:881528
Available from: 2013-07-15 Created: 2015-12-10 Last updated: 2015-12-10Bibliographically approved

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Bergnehr, Disa
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CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

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Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf