Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Evaluative language in physiotherapy practice: How does it contribute to the therapeutic relationship?
Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, The Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare. Regional Development of County of Jönköping Council.
University of Melbourne, Australia.
University of Melbourne, Australia.
University of Melbourne, Australia.
2015 (English)In: Social Science and Medicine, ISSN 0277-9536, E-ISSN 1873-5347, Vol. 143, p. 128-136Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In physiotherapy, the therapeutic relationship - in which a therapist and patient work together to achieve treatment goals is increasingly seen as the foundation of patient care. How the therapeutic relationship is established and enacted, however, is not well understood. One way to better understand the nature of the relationship is to examine how therapists and patients evaluate and inform each other about the patient's physical capacity, sensation, and emotions. As the patient and therapist's talk is the primary means to realise and exchange such evaluations, our focus is on evaluative language used by the therapist and patient in their interactions. The aim of this paper is to examine the language and function of evaluation in physiotherapy consultations. The study is a discourse analytic one using Appraisal Theory. In Appraisal Theory, language resources that speakers use to construe evaluations such as emotions, judgments of behaviour and aesthetics are expressed as a system. The sub-systems are AFFECT (expressing emotion), JUDGMENT (assessing behaviour) and APPRECIATION (evaluating processes and objects). The data are a convenience sample of 18 consultations from two cultural and therapeutic settings: primary healthcare (Sweden, Australia); and hospital rehabilitation (Australia). The findings show that both patient and therapist utilise all sub-systems of Appraisal; however, use of the sub-systems by the therapist and patient differs functionally. JUDGMENT and APPRECIATION play a central role in therapists' co-construction of patients' physical history and presenting problem. In contrast, patient AFFECT evaluations, mainly to do with emotions about loss of capacity and pain, are generally not followed up by the therapist. The findings suggest that while patients engage with the therapeutic relationship from a clinical and interpersonal perspective, therapists are more narrowly focused on their own clinical tasks. The study findings have implications for understandings of the therapeutic relationship in physiotherapy and can inform teaching.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2015. Vol. 143, p. 128-136
Keywords [en]
Australia, Sweden, Physiotherapy, Therapeutic relationship, Discourse analysis, Communication, Clinician-patient interaction, Patient-centred care
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-28497DOI: 10.1016/j.socscimed.2015.08.038ISI: 000364245600015PubMedID: 26356824Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-84941036215Local ID: HHJKvalitetISOAI: oai:DiVA.org:hj-28497DiVA, id: diva2:878075
Available from: 2015-12-08 Created: 2015-12-07 Last updated: 2017-12-01Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text in DiVA

Other links

Publisher's full textPubMedScopus
By organisation
The Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare
In the same journal
Social Science and Medicine
Nursing

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

doi
pubmed
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

doi
pubmed
urn-nbn
Total: 58 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf