Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Creative cities and the new global hierarchy
Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics.
Nottingham University Business School China.
2015 (English)In: Applied Spatial Analysis and Policy, ISSN 1874-463X, Vol. 8, no 3, p. 181-198Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The world experienced three major urbanization processes between the eleventh and the twentieth century. All three periods of city growth were associated with revolutionary improvements in the logistical systems. In large parts of the world the third logistical revolution (the Industrial Revolution) has not yet come to an end. In industrializing countries and regions urbanization is thus very rapid. Concurrently, a new and fourth logistical revolution is changing the economic, social and regional structure of the post-industrial parts of the world, leading to the creation of a new Creative Society. A key aspect of this development is the increasing role of creative and innovative city regions with global linkages. These regions now form a new supranational rank-size distribution, which is centred on a few conurbations in Europe, North America and East Asia. Most post-industrial economic development is taking place in a small number of highly ranked creative regions, while other regions are suffering from the “creative destruction” of their traditional industries. One consequence of this restructuring is increasing regional income inequalities in the post-industrial nations.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2015. Vol. 8, no 3, p. 181-198
Keywords [en]
Creative Society, Post-industrial, Trust, Tolerance, Institutions, Logistical revolution, Inter-regional inequality
National Category
Economics
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-28133DOI: 10.1007/s12061-015-9141-7ISI: 000363022700002Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-84925002802Local ID: IHHNationalekonomiISOAI: oai:DiVA.org:hj-28133DiVA, id: diva2:859645
Available from: 2015-10-08 Created: 2015-10-08 Last updated: 2015-12-03Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text in DiVA

Other links

Publisher's full textScopus

Authority records BETA

Andersson, Åke E.

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Andersson, Åke E.
By organisation
JIBS, Economics
Economics

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

doi
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

doi
urn-nbn
Total: 272 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf