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Optimization Driven Development of Stringer to Leisure Boat
Jönköping University, School of Engineering.
2015 (English)Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
Abstract [en]

The increasing demand for products of light weight and high performance to be produced and developed in shorter periods of times has put high pressure on the product development process. Much research is done in order to find ways on how to speed up this process at the same time as delivering products of higher quality to the customer. Much of the literature focuses on how important it is to “tear down the walls” between departments at a company by integrating as much different knowledge as early in the process as possible. Thereby, much of the costly problems found late in the process can be avoided leading to shorter development times and cost savings.

Commonly companies use simulation software to verify their final designs before the products pass forward to prototyping and test production. In some cases products need to be redesigned and big changes of the product geometry might be necessary which often is very costly in such a late stage of the process.

Eker Design in Fredrikstad, Norway, wants to investigate the potential of using simulation driven design in an early stage of the product development process. In order to make this investigation this exam work has been carried out on a real design case by the development of a new “stringer” totally from scratch. A stringer is what gives rise to the stiffness of the boat and is a structure mounted in-between the hull and the deck. The stringer was developed to the Hydrolift SX22 leisure boat by using simulations and topology optimization software as the driving force for the design. The research questions to be answered were:

  • Is it possible to develop a stringer through a design process based on topology optimization and simulation software with equal performance as the existing stringer?
  • How does the optimized result perform in comparison to the existing stringer?
  • Can any weight reduction be achieved with a new stringer design?

In the end of the work the existing stringer and the new stringer design was compared and evaluated. The results showed that the new stringer with a weight reduction of 30% performed very well in comparison to the existing one. This proves that the topology optimization and simulation driven design process beneficially can be used in marine architecture. It has also proven to be an efficient method to lower the material usage and increase the strength of the stringer. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2015. , 68 p.
Keyword [en]
Topology optimization, boat architecture, scantling design, simulation based design
National Category
Other Mechanical Engineering Composite Science and Engineering
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-27927ISRN: JU-JTH-PRU-2-20150026OAI: oai:DiVA.org:hj-27927DiVA: diva2:856865
External cooperation
Eker Design AS
Subject / course
JTH, Product Development
Supervisors
Examiners
Available from: 2015-09-28 Created: 2015-09-12 Last updated: 2015-09-28Bibliographically approved

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Citation style
  • apa
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