Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
The ‘silver spoon’ in family firms: Gaining credibility as a young professional family member in a new leading position in a family firm
Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration.
2015 (English)Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
Abstract [en]

It is supposed that many managers in an organization are ineffective because the task of managing a new team is underestimated.  The leaders, as well as the organization, too often take this task for granted and are not aware of how difficult the situation can be. Especially in family firms one might ignore the lack of skills and the weaknesses of a family member who shall be appointed for a new leading position.

Through four case studies, including semi-structured interviews with a family and non-family member respectively, we gave answers to our research question how to gain credibility as a young professional family member in a new leading position in a family firm. Further, we investigated how the ‘silver spoon’ influences the credibility of the new leader as a family member.

It was found that the most important factors influencing the credibility of the young professional family member are experience, commitment, individual factor, relationship to family and non-family members. A young professional’s work experience can help to gain respect and credibility from the employees. A high level of commitment to the firm and being willing to work hard helps to overcome the prejudices of the ‘silver spoon’ and shows that they have earned the right to be in the current position.

Furthermore, it was found that the new leaders struggle most with the incumbent, relationship to family members and relationships to non-family members. It is an obstacle that the newcomer is compared to the incumbent and sometimes still treated as a child. An additional problem is that the family pressures the newcomer into responsible positions, which the new leader does not feel prepared for. By giving the newcomer the possibility to gain work experience, through a mentorship program and through the incumbent stepping back and trusting the newcomer, companies can support the young professional family members.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2015. , p. 57
Keywords [en]
Family firm, young professional, credibility, new leader, incumbent, family members, first leading position
National Category
Economics and Business
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-26829ISRN: JU-IHH-FÖA-2-20150021OAI: oai:DiVA.org:hj-26829DiVA, id: diva2:815017
Subject / course
IHH, Business Administration
Supervisors
Examiners
Available from: 2015-07-06 Created: 2015-05-28 Last updated: 2015-07-06Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text in DiVA

By organisation
JIBS, Business Administration
Economics and Business

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

urn-nbn

Altmetric score

urn-nbn
Total: 69 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf