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Labour migration and ‘Smart Public Health’
Innsbruck University.
Department of Food and Resource Economics, Korea University, Seoul, South Korea.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-7902-4683
2014 (English)In: History & Mathematics: Trends and Cycles / [ed] Leonid Grinin, Andrey Korotayev, Volgograd: ‘Uchitel’ Publishing House , 2014Chapter in book (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Public health research debates for two decades the effects of inequality on public health. More recent research also considered the additional effects of international trade and world economic openness. These investigations analyse public health outcomes in such terms as infant mortality rates, life expectancies, etc. But with the growing environmental crisis, ideas to weigh economic or social or public health progress by the ‘environmental input’ necessary to achieve it are increasingly gaining acceptance. We might call such a weighting of infant mortality rates, or life expectancies by the ‘environmental input’ necessary to achieve them ‘smart public health’. Which factors of social organization now contribute then to a responsible use of the resources of our planet Earth to achieve ‘smart public health’?

We use standard OLS non-linear regressions of ecological footprints per capita and their square on combined public health performances. The residuals from this regression are our new measure of ‘smart public health’.

Our research results suggest that not inequality, but migration is a very important determinant of ‘smart public health’. Migration sending countries find it relatively easy to enjoy combined good public health performances at a relatively small environmental price. Other drivers of ‘smart public health’ are the share of a country's population in world population, and the UNDP education index. The main bottleneck of ‘smart public health’ is constituted by the crowding-out effect of public education expenditures on smart health performance.

In contrast to earlier research, we come to the conclusion that migration sending countries reap substantial benefits from receiving worker remittances, while inequality and globalization indicators hardly affect the smart public health performance of the sample countries (all countries with available data).

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Volgograd: ‘Uchitel’ Publishing House , 2014.
Keywords [en]
Index Numbers and Aggregation, public health, infant mortality, female survival probability of surviving to age 65, UNDP human development index (HDI), average life expectancy (years), life satisfaction, international migration, remittances
National Category
Economics Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-25973ISBN: 978-5-7057-4223-3 (print)OAI: oai:DiVA.org:hj-25973DiVA, id: diva2:794626
Available from: 2015-03-12 Created: 2015-03-12 Last updated: 2016-02-04Bibliographically approved

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CiteExportLink to record
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Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
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  • de-DE
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Output format
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