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Factors associated with grip strength decline in older adults
Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology.
University of California, Riverside, CA, USA.
Department of Psychology, Indiana University Southeast, New Albany, IN, USA.
Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-4149-9787
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2014 (English)In: Age and Ageing, ISSN 0002-0729, E-ISSN 1468-2834, Vol. 44, no 2, 269-274 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: few studies have examined associations of multi-faceted demographic, health and lifestyle factors with longterm change in grip strength performance across the adult lifespan. The aim of this study was to examine the associations of risk factors in specific parts of the adult lifespan (e.g. in early midlife, in late midlife and in old adulthood) separately for women and men.

Methods: data came from the longitudinal Swedish Adoption/Twin Study of Aging (SATSA). Grip strength performance was followed in 849 participants who were 5088 years of age at baseline. The follow-up period with seven waves of data of grip strength was 22 years, and the risk factors were measured up to 20 years before the assessment of grip strength. Latent growth modelling was used for the longitudinal analyses.

Results: a gender difference in the type of factors associated with grip strength performance and development across the adult lifespan was found. Significant factors for the age slopes for women were stress, smoking and dementia. For men, marital status, mean arterial pressure, physical activity at work and having a chronic disorder were of importance. These factors varied in their associations with grip strength across the adult lifespan.

Conclusion: factors measured earlier in adulthood were associated with grip strength decline in late midlife and old adulthood. Gender-specific patterns of risk factors suggest that it may be worthwhile to conduct research on grip and muscle strength (and biological vitality) separately for men and women.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2014. Vol. 44, no 2, 269-274 p.
Keyword [en]
grip strength, risk factors, lifespan, longitudinal, aged, gender differences, older people
National Category
Gerontology, specializing in Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-25620DOI: 10.1093/ageing/afu170ISI: 000352159500017PubMedID: 25362503Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-84925293645Local ID: HHJÖvrigtISOAI: oai:DiVA.org:hj-25620DiVA: diva2:780210
Available from: 2015-01-14 Created: 2015-01-14 Last updated: 2016-10-24Bibliographically approved

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Sternäng, OlaErnsth-Bravell, MarieDahl Aslan, Anna K.
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