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Children's experiences of visiting a seriously ill/injured relative on an adult intensive care unit
The Sahlgrenska Academy at Göteborg University, Institute of Health and Care Sciences, Göteborg, Sweden.
2008 (English)In: Journal of Advanced Nursing, ISSN 0309-2402, E-ISSN 1365-2648, Vol. 61, no 2, 154-62 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

AIM: This paper is a report of a study of children's experiences of visiting a seriously ill/injured relative in an intensive care unit.

BACKGROUND: Little attention has been paid to children's experiences and needs when visiting a relative being cared for at a high technological adult intensive care unit. Instead, the focus has been on adult's experiences and needs.

METHOD: In 2004, 28 children (14 girls, 14 boys) aged 4-17 years who had visited an adult relative were interviewed 3 months after the visit. A hermeneutic approach was used when interpreting and analysing the text.

FINDINGS: Four themes were generated from the data: It meant waiting, It was strange, It was white and It was good. Waiting was experienced as difficult, increasing the feeling of uncertainty, exclusion and separation, which in turn led to tension and concern. 'It was strange' was perceived as unfamiliar but also with interest and curiosity. The experience of the intensive care unit was that it was white. Everything in the patient's room was experienced as white and gloomy. It lacked joy. 'It was good' was stated about the outcome of the visit because through this they were given the opportunity to meet and see the relative by themselves. This evoked feelings of relief and joy. The visit did not seem to frighten the child; instead it generated feelings of release and relief.

CONCLUSION: Children's experiences of visiting an adult intensive care unit seem to support theories that emphasize the involvement and participation of children in family matters.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2008. Vol. 61, no 2, 154-62 p.
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-25427DOI: 10.1111/j.1365-2648.2007.04472.xISI: 000252121000005PubMedID: 18186907OAI: oai:DiVA.org:hj-25427DiVA: diva2:774647
Available from: 2014-12-27 Created: 2014-12-27 Last updated: 2015-06-12Bibliographically approved

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CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

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Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf