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Local visual perception bias in children with high-functioning autism spectrum disorders; do we have the whole picture?
Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, CHILD.
School of Occupational Therapy & Social Work, Curtin Health Innovation Research Institute (CHIRI), Curtin University, Perth, Western Australia.
School of Occupational Therapy & Social Work, Curtin Health Innovation Research Institute (CHIRI), Curtin University, Perth, Western Australia.
School of Occupational Therapy & Social Work, Curtin Health Innovation Research Institute (CHIRI), Curtin University, Perth, Western Australia.
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2016 (English)In: Developmental Neurorehabilitation, ISSN 1751-8423, E-ISSN 1751-8431, Vol. 19, no 2, 117-122 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objective: While local bias in visual processing in children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) has been reported to result in difficulties in recognizing faces and facially expressed emotions, but superior ability in disembedding figures, associations between these abilities within a group of children with and without ASD have not been explored.

Methods: Possible associations in performance on the Visual Perception Skills Figure–Ground test, a face recognition test and an emotion recognition test were investigated within 25 8–12-years-old children with high-functioning autism/Asperger syndrome, and in comparison to 33 typically developing children.

Results: Analyses indicated a weak positive correlation between accuracy in Figure–Ground recognition and emotion recognition. No other correlation estimates were significant.

Conclusion: These findings challenge both the enhanced perceptual function hypothesis and the weak central coherence hypothesis, and accentuate the importance of further scrutinizing the existance and nature of local visual bias in ASD.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2016. Vol. 19, no 2, 117-122 p.
Keyword [en]
Central coherence, embedded figures, emotion recognition, enhanced perceptual function hypothesis, face recognition
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-25377DOI: 10.3109/17518423.2014.928387ISI: 000370552000007PubMedID: 24960245Local ID: HHJCHILDIS, HLKCHILDISOAI: oai:DiVA.org:hj-25377DiVA: diva2:773221
Available from: 2014-12-18 Created: 2014-12-18 Last updated: 2016-09-22Bibliographically approved

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