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Getting published – and cited in entrepreneurship: Reflections on ten papers
Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane, Australia.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-6363-1382
2014 (English)In: How to get published in the best entrepreneurship journals: a guide to steer your academic career / [ed] Alain Fayolle and Mike Wright, Cheltenham, UK: Edward Elgar Publishing, 2014, 46-71 p.Chapter in book (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

I grew up in academic heaven. At least for me it was. Not only was Sweden in the late 1980s paradise for any kind of empirical research, with rich and high-quality business statistics being made available to researchers without them having to sign away their lives; 70+ percent response rates achieved in mail surveys to almost any group (if you knew how to do them), and boards of directors opening their doors to more qualitatively orientated researchers to sit in during their meetings. In addition, I perceived an environment with a very high degree of academic freedom, letting me do whatever I found interesting and important. I’m sure for others it was sheer hell, with very unclear career paths and rules of the game. Career progression (something which rarely entered my mind) meant that you tried as best you could and then you put all your work – reports, books, book chapters, conference papers, maybe even published articles – in a box and had some external committee of professors look at it. If you were lucky they liked what they saw for whatever reasons their professorial wisdom dictated, and you got hired or promoted. If you were not so lucky you wouldn’t get the job or the promotion, without quite knowing why. So people could easily imagine an old boys club – whose members were themselves largely unproven in international, peer review publishing – picking whoever they wanted by whatever criteria they choose to apply. Neither the fact that assessors were external nor the presence of an appeals system might have completely appeased your suspicious and skeptical mind, considering the balance of power.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Cheltenham, UK: Edward Elgar Publishing, 2014. 46-71 p.
Keyword [en]
business and management, entrepreneurship, research methods in business and management
National Category
Business Administration
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-25344DOI: 10.4337/9781782540625.00010ISBN: 9781782540618 (print)ISBN: 9781783471478 (print)ISBN: 9781782540625 (print)OAI: oai:DiVA.org:hj-25344DiVA: diva2:772836
Available from: 2014-12-17 Created: 2014-12-17 Last updated: 2015-12-22Bibliographically approved

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Publisher's full texthttp://eprints.qut.edu.au/63038/

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CiteExportLink to record
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