Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Oral health, medical diagnoses, and functioning profiles in children with disabilities receiving paediatric specialist dental care – a study using the ICF-CY
Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. CHILD.
Mälardalens högskola.
Tandvårdshögskolan, Malmö högskola.
Clermont Université, Université d’Auvergne, EA3847, Centre de Recherche en Odontologie Clinique, Clermont-Ferrand, France.
Show others and affiliations
2015 (English)In: Disability and Rehabilitation, ISSN 0963-8288, E-ISSN 1464-5165, Vol. 37, no 16, 1431-1438 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose: To describe 0–16-year-old children with disabilities receiving paediatric specialist dental care from a biopsychosocial perspective, with focus on relationship between oral health, medical diagnosis, and functioning. Method: A questionnaire with an International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health – Children and Youth version (ICF-CY) Checklist for Oral Health was completed using structured interview, direct observation, and information from dental records. Descriptive data analysis was performed together with principle component analysis to calculate factors of functioning used in cluster analysis in order to present functioning profiles. Results: Ninety-nine children with at least one major medical diagnosis were included. Twenty had previous caries experience. Two factors of functioning were calculated, labelled “Physical ability” and “Intellectual ability, communication, and behaviour”. Based on functioning profiles three clusters were determined. There were no statistically significant differences in caries experience between medical diagnoses or clusters. Conclusion: It was possible to identify profiles of functioning in children with disabilities receiving specialist dental care. Despite complex disabilities, the children had good oral health. Neither medical diagnosis nor functioning was found to have a clear relationship with oral health. To understand the environmental context leading to high-quality oral health, further studies of dental management in relation to medical and oral diagnoses and child functioning are needed.

Implications for Rehabilitation

  • Child Oral Health

  • The use of ICF-CY makes it possible for paediatric dentists to assess children’s functioning, disability, and health from a biopsychosocial perspective, showing that the medical diagnosis alone is not enough to assess functions relevant for oral health in the individual.

  • In order to adequately organize, plan, and improve dental care for this heterogenic group of young patients with disabilities a biopsychosocial approach is valuable, aiding a holistic perspective on oral health.

  • Despite complex medical and functional disabilities that may challenge oral health and dental care, this study finds oral health to be good in a group of children with disabilities attending a specialist dental clinic.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2015. Vol. 37, no 16, 1431-1438 p.
Keyword [en]
Children, ICF-CY, oral health
National Category
Dentistry
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-25339DOI: 10.3109/09638288.2014.964374ISI: 000358630700005PubMedID: 25250806Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-84934280429Local ID: HHJCHILDISOAI: oai:DiVA.org:hj-25339DiVA: diva2:772777
Available from: 2014-12-17 Created: 2014-12-17 Last updated: 2017-04-12Bibliographically approved
In thesis
1. A biopsychosocial approach to functioning, oral health and specialist dental health care in children with disabilities – Swedish and international perspectives
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A biopsychosocial approach to functioning, oral health and specialist dental health care in children with disabilities – Swedish and international perspectives
2017 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Introduction: Maintaining good oral health may be more important for children with disabilities than others, since problems with oral health may increase the impact of a disability, or the medical condition may increase the risk for poor oral health. In addition, the risk for oral health problems may be influenced by the functioning of the child. Functioning can also affect the child’s ability to cooperate in the dental setting, and how dental treatment is performed. A medical diagnosis alone does not provide enough information about a child’s functioning, nor oral health. Thus, there is a need for a holistic perspective of oral health and dental health care in children with disabilities. The International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health - Children and Youth (ICF-CY) enables a structured assessment of the biopsychosocial consequences of a health condition.

Aim: The overall aim of this thesis was to investigate how biopsychosocial factors relate to oral health and specialist dental health care in children with disabilities in a Swedish, and an international context, with special focus on the experience of dental treatment under general anaesthesia (DGA).

Material and methods: The research was conducted using a quantitative, cross-sectional, comparative and descriptive design. An ICF-CY Checklist for Oral Health was completed with data from a structured interview with children 0-16 years old, referred for specialist dental health care, and their parents/carers. Additional information was retrieved from dental and medical records. Three groups were included in data analyses: one large international group of 218 children from Argentina, France, Ireland and Sweden; one large Swedish group with 99 children with complex disabilities; and one international group of children with disabilities and manifest dental caries from Argentina, France and Sweden.

Results: The ICF-CY Checklist for Oral Health identified both common and varying functional, social and environmental aspects relevant for oral health and oral health care in children who had been referred to specialist dental clinics in four countries. Swedish children with caries experience had been referred to a paediatric dental specialist clinic at a significantly older age than caries-free children. The medical diagnoses were not significantly related to dental caries or child functioning in the large Swedish group with complex disabilities and low caries prevalence, nor was there a significant relationship between dental caries and child functioning. Collinearity between dental caries and problems in the functioning factor ’Interpersonal interactions andrelationships’ was observed in the international group of children with disabilities and manifest dental caries. DGA sessions with combined medical and dental treatment were common in the large Swedish study group. Children with experience of DGA had more severe problems in intellectual functions than those without experience of DGA. Problems in interpersonal interactions and relationships increased, while problems with mobility decreased, the likelihood for children having had experience of DGA. On international group level, dmft/DMFT was significantly higher in children with the experience of DGA than in those without DGA experience, but looking at Argentina, France and Sweden separately, this was not true for the Swedish children. There were significant, international differences between the prevalence of dmft/DMFT, DGA and environmental barriers.

Conclusion: The biopsychosocial perspective, operationalised by the ICF-CY, contributes a holistic view on oral health and specialist dental health care in children with disabilities. In addition to certain differences, children with different health status from different countries share many functional and environmental aspects, important for oral health and dental health care. Early referral to a paediatric specialist dental clinic seemed favourable for oral health. The medical diagnosis was not related to child functioning or dental caries. Child functioning had a significant impact on DGA, and in children with disabilities and manifest dental caries, child functioning also had a correlation with caries. The dental caries burden was a stronger factor than functioning for the experience of DGA, however, dental health organisation and country context seemed to matter the most. Combining dental and medical procedures during the same GA session is good use of resources for both the individual and the society. To ensure children with complex disabilities to have the possibility of achieving equivalent good oral health as other children, DGA is one important factor.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Jönköping: Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, 2017. 96 p.
Series
Hälsohögskolans avhandlingsserie, ISSN 1654-3602 ; 082
Keyword
children, disabilities, oral health, dental care, functioning, ICF, dental general anaesthesia
National Category
Dentistry Pediatrics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-35359 (URN)978-91-85835-81-2 (ISBN)
Public defence
2017-05-12, Forum Humanum, School of Health and Welfare, Jönköping, 13:00 (English)
Opponent
Supervisors
Available from: 2017-04-20 Created: 2017-04-12 Last updated: 2017-04-21Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text

Other links

Publisher's full textPubMedScopus

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Norderyd, JohannaGranlund, Mats
By organisation
HHJ. CHILDHLK, CHILD
In the same journal
Disability and Rehabilitation
Dentistry

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

Altmetric score

Total: 449 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf