Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Active ageing through work and learning
Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Lifelong learning/Encell.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-4248-0634
2014 (English)Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

The demographic changes, with an ageing population in many countries, are usually seen as a financial problem and the solution is to discuss a higher retirement age. In Sweden, the government is working with changes on several levels to make it possible to continue working later in life. This discussion is however paradoxical. People who are sick or worn-out are afraid of being forced to prolong their work life. People, who want to continue working, cannot stay because of employers’ negative attitude towards older employees. To work longer can be a way for individuals to stay active which promotes good health and well-being, but the discussion needs to include alternative solutions and a broader perspective, not just prolonging working life. Work is often equal to fulltime employment and the role of learning throughout (work)life is seldom addressed. In addition, one often forgets to ask the older adults themselves about their experience and opinion in this matter. We talk about them and not with them.

The purpose of this paper is to study the role of work and learning in older adults lives. A survey was distributed in four pensioner's associations in one of Sweden’s county’s. 232 individuals replied and out of these, 83 (35,8%) have worked in some form after retirement. Only four of these had worked fulltime. About half had worked for payment and the rest had worked for non-profit organizations. The primary context for learning activities was to be involved in a study circle.

Based on the results of this study, there was an expressed need for individual flexibility and adjustment so that pensioners could stay active and productive on their own terms. In today’s working life, flexibility is usually a demand on the workforce but rarely expected from employers. There is also a lack of the systematic integration of education in a lifelong perspective.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2014.
National Category
Learning
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-25147OAI: oai:DiVA.org:hj-25147DiVA: diva2:762986
Conference
Education and Learning of Older Adults (ELOA) 2014 Conference 'Innovations in older adult learning: Theory, research, policy', 22 - 24 October 2014, University of Malta, Valletta
Available from: 2014-11-13 Created: 2014-11-13 Last updated: 2016-02-10Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Bjursell, Cecilia
By organisation
HLK, Lifelong learning/Encell
Learning

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

Total: 337 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf