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Decelerating agricultural society: Theoretical and historical perspectives
Department of Industrial Engineering, College of Engineering, Seoul National University, 599 Gwanak-ro, Gwanak-gu, Seoul, 151-742, South Korea.
Department of Industrial Engineering, College of Engineering, Seoul National University, 599 Gwanak-ro, Gwanak-gu, Seoul, 151-742, South Korea.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-7902-4683
Technology Management, Economics and Policy Program, Seoul National University, 599 Gwanak-ro, Gwanak-gu, Seoul, 151-742, South Korea.
2010 (English)In: Technological forecasting & social change, ISSN 0040-1625, E-ISSN 1873-5509, Vol. 77, no 3, 479-499 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In general, societies are divided into agricultural and industrial types. This study presents theoretical and historical perspectives on decelerating agricultural societies. Agricultural demand and supply play major roles in society development. Three descriptions of an agricultural society and theories of its deceleration patterns are presented: the neo-classical production function, stage theory, and induced innovation. Two important cases of decelerating agricultural societies and their ultimate replacement by industrial societies, medieval Europe and nineteenth- and twentieth-century United States, are examined. The limitations of decelerating agricultural societies with a focus on structural problems, impacts of industrial structure, and problems of agriculture in market and non-market areas, are also discussed. The position of agriculture as described by economic development theory is established by analyzing the stages of economic development, the theory of structural change, and the theory of leading industry. Finally, the transition from an agricultural to a commercial society is described with a focus on the formation, development, value creation, and structural limitations of a commercial society. ©2009 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2010. Vol. 77, no 3, 479-499 p.
Keyword [en]
Agricultural development; Agricultural society; Demand and supply; Economic development; Economic development theory; Economic growths; Historical perspective; Industrial societies; Industrial structures; Leading industry; Market areas; Production function; Structural change; Structural problems; Value creation, Agriculture; Competition; Societies and institutions, Economics, agricultural development; agricultural market; agricultural production; economic development; economic growth; economic theory; historical perspective; innovation; Medieval; neoclassical theory; nineteenth century; theoretical study; twentieth century, Europe; United States
National Category
Economics
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-24503DOI: 10.1016/j.techfore.2009.08.005Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-75849124396OAI: oai:DiVA.org:hj-24503DiVA: diva2:742704
Available from: 2014-09-02 Created: 2014-09-01 Last updated: 2016-01-14Bibliographically approved

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