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Mental healthcare staff's knowledge and experiences of diabetes care for persons with psychosis: a qualitative interview study
Psychiatric Clinic, County Hospital, Ryhov, Jönköping, Sweden; School of Health Sciences, Linnaeus University, Växjö, Sweden.
2013 (English)In: Primary Health Care Research and Development, ISSN 1463-4236, E-ISSN 1477-1128, Vol. 14, no 3, 281-92 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

AIM: This paper aims to explore and analyse mental healthcare staff's (MHCS) knowledge and experiences of diabetes care for persons with psychosis.

BACKGROUND: There are a range of studies concerning the increased risk of type 2 diabetes mellitus among persons with psychosis, and the need for healthy lifestyle interventions to prevent the illness. MHCS are often trusted and have regular follow-ups with the patients, and their attitudes and actions often play an important role for the person's care behaviour. There is still little documentation of their experiences of diabetes care.

METHODS: A qualitative, explorative design was used, collecting data through semi-structured interviews with 12 MHCS working in psychosis outpatient care in Sweden. Data were analysed with qualitative content analysis. Findings Three categories emerged and provide a deeper understanding of how staff were aware of the risks of type 2 diabetes among their patients and therefore performed lifestyle interventions to promote these. Nevertheless, they lacked knowledge of diabetes care and simultaneously felt a lack of training among diabetes nurses to adapt diabetes care to suit persons with cognitive dysfunctions. Patients who were overconfident in their ability to manage diabetes care reported to have experienced most difficulties. Cooperation among those involved in these persons' health was considered necessary. Implications Diabetes care for persons with psychosis could improve if knowledge of type 2 diabetes was increased among MHCS and training in how to adapt diabetes care to persons with cognitive dysfunctions was enlarged among diabetes nurses. A challenge for nurses is to see how the care of different illnesses and support given by the family and others affect the persons total life situation and health. Healthcare plans and cooperation among all those involved in these persons' health is necessary for this.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2013. Vol. 14, no 3, 281-92 p.
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-24281DOI: 10.1017/S1463423612000321PubMedID: 22784379Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-84894345625OAI: oai:DiVA.org:hj-24281DiVA: diva2:735986
Available from: 2014-08-04 Created: 2014-08-04 Last updated: 2015-06-30

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CiteExportLink to record
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Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
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More styles
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  • de-DE
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