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Midlife and Late-Life Body Mass Index and Late-Life Dementia: Results from a Prospective Population-Based Cohort
University of Eastern Finland.
Karolinska Institutet.
Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Ageing - living conditions and health. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology.
University of Eastern Finland.
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2014 (English)In: Journal of Alzheimer's Disease, ISSN 1387-2877, E-ISSN 1875-8908, Vol. 38, no 1, 201-209 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Obesity has been consistently associated with dementia. The role of certain risk factors of dementia may change during life, and the importance of having a life-course perspective has been acknowledged. Objective: The aim of this study was to investigate the association of midlife and late-life body mass index (BMI) with late-life dementia/Alzheimer's disease (AD) and whether the association was independent of other obesity-related co-morbidities. Methods: The association between midlife BMI (mean age 50.2, SD 6.0) and late-life BMI (mean age 71.2, SD 4.0) and incident dementia later in life (mean age 75.7, SD 5.0) were investigated among 1,304 participants of the longitudinal population-based Cardiovascular risk factors, Aging and Dementia (CAIDE) study, conducted in Eastern Finland. The duration of follow-up was 26 years. The diagnosis of dementia was based on DSM-IV criteria and the probable and possible AD on the NINCDS-ADRDA criteria. Results: Higher midlife BMI was associated with higher risk of incident dementia (adjusted HR, 95% CI 1.07, 1.00–1.14). However, decrease in BMI from midlife to late-life was associated with higher risk of dementia (1.14, 1.03–1.25 for one-unit decrease) and AD (1.20, 1.09–1.33). High late-life BMI was associated with lower risk of AD (0.89, 0.81–0.98) but the association with dementia was less evident (0.94, 0.86–1.03). Conclusion: Higher midlife BMI is related to higher risk of dementia and AD, independently of obesity-related risk factors and co-morbidities. Steeper decrease of BMI and low late-life BMI are associated with higher risk of dementia and AD. These findings highlight the importance of life-course perspective when assessing the association between BMI and cognition.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2014. Vol. 38, no 1, 201-209 p.
Keyword [en]
Alzheimers´s disease, body mass index, dementia, obesity
National Category
Neurosciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-23096DOI: 10.3233/JAD-130698ISI: 000326380300018PubMedID: 23948937Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-84887229354Local ID: HHJÅldrandeISOAI: oai:DiVA.org:hj-23096DiVA: diva2:687483
Available from: 2014-01-14 Created: 2014-01-14 Last updated: 2016-11-04Bibliographically approved

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