Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Craniofacial and dentofacial development in pigs fed soft and hard diets
Orthodontic Clinic, Falköping, Sweden, and Department of Orthodontics, Faculty of Dentistry, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway.
Department of Orthodontics, Faculty of Dentistry, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway.
Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Oral health.
Swedish Animal Health Service, Skara, Sweden.
Show others and affiliations
2005 (English)In: American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics, ISSN 0889-5406, E-ISSN 1097-6752, Vol. 128, no 6, 731-739 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

INTRODUCTION: Several authors have found a correlation between reduced chewing activity and malocclusion. In animal experiments, it has been possible to correlate a diet of low chewing resistance to narrower arches, which predispose the subject to crowding and irregular teeth.

METHODS: In this study, 17 pigs were weaned at 5 weeks of age and divided into 2 groups according to diet and housing. The soft-diet, indoor group was housed in conventional pens, and the animals were fed aliquots of barley and oats with soya and a mineral-vitamin premix added. The food was mixed with water at a dry matter content of about 25%. The hard-diet, outdoor group was kept outdoors; the pigs were fed solid food and also ate organic matter in the soil. All pigs were killed at 22 months of age. The skulls were dissected, and transverse and sagittal craniofacial and dentofacial dimensions were measured.

RESULTS: Chewing hard food caused considerable occlusal and approximal attrition in the experimental animals. The dental arches were shorter due to this attrition and to mesial migration of the molars and premolars. The approximal attrition also reduced the tendency for crowding and rotation of the teeth. Posterior crossbite was more common among the hard-chewing animals.

CONCLUSIONS: The increase in arch width in the hard-diet animals reported in the literature was not duplicated in this study. On the contrary, the soft-diet pigs had significantly wider arches than the hard-diet animals. This was most pronounced in the premolar region and could be the result of an atypical tongue habit, caused by the nonphysiologic feeding of the pigs. The soft-diet pigs also had a greater tendency to postnormal occlusion, especially in the canine region.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2005. Vol. 128, no 6, 731-739 p.
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-23062DOI: 10.1016/j.ajodo.2004.09.025PubMedID: 16360913Local ID: HHJövrigtISOAI: oai:DiVA.org:hj-23062DiVA: diva2:687192
Available from: 2014-01-13 Created: 2014-01-13 Last updated: 2014-02-17Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text

Other links

Publisher's full textPubMed
By organisation
HHJ. Oral health
In the same journal
American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics
Medical and Health Sciences

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

Altmetric score

Total: 97 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf