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Secular changes in tooth size and dental arch dimensions in the mixed dentition
Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine.
2003 (English)In: Swedish Dental Journal, ISSN 0347-9994, no 157, 1-89 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Secular changes in the mixed dentition were studied. Permanent tooth size and dental arch dimensions were examined in Norwegian children born in the 1960s and 1980s, Swedish children born in the 1960s and 1980s, Norwegian Sami children born in the 1980s, and a sample of Norwegian skulls dating from the 14th to the 19th century. The Norwegian Sami children were nomadic in the summertime. A sample of pigs was studied before and after a maceration process to determine what dimensional changes might occur in such a process. A shrinkage of 0.3%-1.7% was found. This information was used when the skulls were compared with the modern groups. Lateral dental arch lengths were shorter in the children born in the 1960s compared with the children born in the 1980s. This was a result of the higher prevalence of caries in the second deciduous molars in the 1960s groups. Children who had lost a deciduous canine prematurely were found to have smaller dental arch perimeters. When compared with other data, this was blamed on a pre-existing crowding. Permanent tooth size was smaller in the skulls compared with the modern groups. Improved nutrition is considered to be the main reason for the difference. Relative dental arch space differed in the group born in the 1960s from that in the other groups, indicating a greater prevalence of crowding in the former. Relative dental arch space in the skulls and in the group born in the 1980s was similar. A more traditional way of living, as practised by the Sami group in this thesis, was not favorable for relative dental arch space. The transverse intermaxillary relation in boys changed from the 1960s to the 1980s, which indicated that the 1980s group ran a greater risk of developing a posterior cross-bite. Before the same conclusion could be made in the girls, the mesial drift of the first permanent molars had to be corrected for, because of a higher prevalence of caries in the 1960s group. The sex-pooled analysis of the skulls and the contemporary groups revealed that the risk for developing a posterior cross-bite in the 1980s group was greater than in the skulls. The skulls had smaller arch depths than the modern groups.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2003. no 157, 1-89 p.
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-23064PubMedID: 12737091OAI: oai:DiVA.org:hj-23064DiVA: diva2:687191
Available from: 2014-01-13 Created: 2014-01-13 Last updated: 2014-01-28Bibliographically approved

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CiteExportLink to record
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