Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Transverse dental and dental arch depth dimensions in the mixed dentition in a skeletal sample from the 14th to the 19th century and Norwegian children and Norwegian Sami children of today
Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Oral health.
Department of Orthodontics, Faculty of Dentistry, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway.
Department of Orthodontics, Faculty of Dentistry, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway.
Department of Orthodontics, Faculty of Dentistry, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway.
2002 (English)In: Angle orthodontist, ISSN 0003-3219, Vol. 72, no 5, 439-48 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Secular changes in transverse dental arch dimensions and dental arch depth were studied. Four cohorts with mixed dentitions were selected. The skull group comprised 48 skulls dating from the 14th to the 19th century and belonging to The Schreiner Collection at the Department of Anatomy, University of Oslo. The 1980s Sami group was comprised of 39 boys and 34 girls born in 1987 and living in the northern part of Norway. The 1960s Oslo group was comprised of 31 boys and 30 girls born in 1963 and living in the southern part of Norway. The 1980s Oslo group was comprised of 32 boys and 26 girls born in 1983 and living in the same area in southern Norway as the previous Oslo group. Sex was unknown in the skeletal sample, and the groups were analyzed with the sexes pooled; separate descriptive values are presented for the modern groups. The mandibular intercanine distance was smaller in the skulls compared with the modern groups. The transverse intermaxillary difference between the molars was larger in the skull group than in the 1980s Oslo group. The difference between the maxillary and mandibular intercanine distances was larger in the skulls compared with the modern groups, although the small number of measurements in the skull group impeded further analysis. The arch depth was smaller in the skull group compared with the modern groups; the 1960s Oslo group deviated because of a higher prevalence of caries in the second deciduous molars. The overjet was smaller among the skulls. The arch form measured as the angle between the left and right molar tooth rows was more acute in the skulls than in the modern groups. It was concluded that smaller arch depths are found in skeletal samples at early ages and that attrition does not explain the more upright incisors found in skeletal samples. A secular trend was found in the intermaxillary relation, which indicated that children in the 1980s Oslo group were at greater risk of developing a posterior cross-bite than children born in the 14th to 19th centuries.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2002. Vol. 72, no 5, 439-48 p.
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-23066PubMedID: 12401053OAI: oai:DiVA.org:hj-23066DiVA: diva2:687188
Available from: 2014-01-13 Created: 2014-01-13 Last updated: 2014-02-17Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text

Other links

PubMedhttp://www.angle.org/doi/pdf/10.1043/0003-3219%282002%29072%3C0439%3ATDADAD%3E2.0.CO%3B2
By organisation
HHJ. Oral health
In the same journal
Angle orthodontist
Medical and Health Sciences

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

Altmetric score

Total: 83 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf