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Dental arch space and permanent tooth size in the mixed dentition of a skeletal sample from the 14th to the 19th centuries and 3 contemporary samples
Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ. Oral health.
2002 (English)In: American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics, ISSN 0889-5406, E-ISSN 1097-6752, Vol. 122, no 1, 48-58 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Dental arch space and permanent tooth size in the mixed dentition were studied in 4 cohorts: (1) 48 skulls from the 14th to the 19th centuries from The Schreiner Collection in the Department of Anatomy, University of Oslo; (2) 39 boys and 34 girls of Sami origin born in the 1980s living in northern Norway; (3) 31 boys and 30 girls born in the 1960s living in southern Norway; and (4) 32 boys and 26 girls born in the 1980s living in the same part of southern Norway as the previous group. The sexes were unknown in the skeletal sample, and the groups were analyzed with the sexes pooled. The crown sizes of the permanent teeth in the mixed dentition of the Norwegian children who had lived between the 14th and the 19th centuries were smaller than those of contemporary children living in the same country. Probable reasons for this increase in tooth size include improved nutrition and reduced morbidity, because this study ruled out attrition as a major cause of the discrepancy in tooth size. The relative space (arch perimeter minus tooth size) in the group born in the 1960s deviated from that in the other 3 groups, indicating a greater degree of crowding in this group. The relative space in the skulls did not differ significantly from that in the groups born in the 1980s. This means that the improved caries situation during the last decades has changed the dental arch space in these populations. The irregularity index of the 4 mandibular permanent incisors was larger in the skulls than in the modern samples.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2002. Vol. 122, no 1, 48-58 p.
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Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-23067DOI: 10.1067/mod.2002.124995PubMedID: 12142897OAI: oai:DiVA.org:hj-23067DiVA: diva2:687187
Available from: 2014-01-13 Created: 2014-01-13 Last updated: 2014-02-17Bibliographically approved

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CiteExportLink to record
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Citation style
  • apa
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  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
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More styles
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  • de-DE
  • en-GB
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  • fi-FI
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