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The diversified nature of “domesticated” news discourse: The case of climate change in national news media
Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Media and Communication Studies.
2014 (English)In: Journalism Studies, ISSN 1461-670X, E-ISSN 1469-9699, Vol. 15, no 6, 711-725 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Several studies have concluded that foreign news in national media is characterized by a national logic largely caused by so-called “domestication,” i.e. the adaptation of news from “outside” to a perceived national audience. The domesticated news discourse counteracts discursive constructions of the global, reinforcing instead nation-state discourse and identity. However, this paper argues that we need to take the search for constructions of the transnational beyond the genre of foreign news. The deterritorialized nature of today's globalized risks and crises, such as climate change, blurs the boundaries between the domestic and foreign, and renders the distinction between domestic and foreign news more or less obsolete. This, in turn, requires us to revisit the concept and practice of “domestication” using context-sensitive analytical approaches to capture its discursive constitution. Guided by the theoretical and methodological framework of critical discourse analysis (CDA), this paper aims to analyze and de-construct news discourses of “domestication” by studying the reporting on climate change in Indian, Swedish, and US newspapers. It identifies three discursive modes of domestication: (1) introverted domestication, which disconnects the domestic from the global; (2) extroverted domestication, which interconnects the domestic and the global; and (3) counter-domestication, a deterritorialized mode of reporting that lacks any domestic epicenter.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2014. Vol. 15, no 6, 711-725 p.
Keyword [en]
climate change, critical discourse analysis, deterritorialization, domestication, global journalism, global media, media globalization
National Category
Media and Communications
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-22385DOI: 10.1080/1461670X.2013.837253ISI: 000343714100002OAI: oai:DiVA.org:hj-22385DiVA: diva2:654813
Available from: 2013-10-08 Created: 2013-10-08 Last updated: 2016-09-22Bibliographically approved

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CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf