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Changes in Depressive Symptoms in the Context of Disablement Processes: Role of Demographic Characteristics, Cognitive Function, Health, and Social Support
Utah State Univ, Dept Family Consumer & Human Dev, Logan, UT 84322 USA.
Penn State Univ, Dept Human Dev & Family Studies, University Pk, PA 16802 USA.
Penn State Univ, Dept Human Dev & Family Studies, University Pk, PA 16802 USA.
Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology.
2012 (English)In: The journals of gerontology. Series B, Psychological sciences and social sciences, ISSN 1079-5014, E-ISSN 1758-5368, Vol. 67, no 2, 167-177 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Gerontological research suggests that depressive symptoms show antecedent and consequent relations with late-life disability. Less is known, however, about how depressive symptoms change with the progression of disability-related processes and what factors moderate such changes. We applied multiphase growth models to longitudinal data pooled across 4 Swedish studies of very old age (N = 779, M age = 86 years at disability onset, 64% women) to describe change in depressive symptoms prior to disability onset, at or around disability onset (the measurement wave at which assistance in personal activities of daily living was first recorded), and postdisability onset. Results indicate that, on average, depressive symptoms slightly increase with approaching disability, increase at onset, and decline in the postdisability phase. Age, study membership, being a woman, and multimorbidity were related to depressive symptoms, but social support emerged as the most powerful predictor of level and change in depressive symptoms. Our findings are consistent with conceptual notions implicating disability-related factors as key contributors to late-life change and suggest that contextual and psychosocial factors play a pivotal role for how well people adapt to late-life challenges.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2012. Vol. 67, no 2, 167-177 p.
Keyword [en]
Disability, Growth models, Late life, Oldest old, Successful aging
National Category
Gerontology, specializing in Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-22031DOI: 10.1093/geronb/gbr078ISI: 000301975600004OAI: oai:DiVA.org:hj-22031DiVA: diva2:650995
Available from: 2013-09-24 Created: 2013-09-24 Last updated: 2013-09-24Bibliographically approved

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The journals of gerontology. Series B, Psychological sciences and social sciences
Gerontology, specializing in Medical and Health Sciences

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CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

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Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
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  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
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  • Other locale
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