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(In)Formal Support and Unmet Needs in the National Long-Term care Survey
Department of Public Health, Temple University, Philadelphia, PA, USA.
Department of Health Science, Linthicum, Towson University, Towson, MD, USA.
Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology.
Jönköping University, School of Health Science, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology.
2013 (English)In: Journal of Comparative Family Studies, ISSN 0047-2328, Vol. 44, no 4, 437-453 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

We linked individual-level data from the 2004 wave of the National Long-Term Care Survey with state-level data from the National Aging Program Information Systems (NAPIS) State Program Reports to predict care mix and unmet need for assistance. Our sample consisted of 2422 community-dwelling individuals aged 65 and older (69% women, 8% nonwhite) who reported at least one limitation in an instrumental or basic activity of daily living. We used the data to predict the mix of formal and informal support received, and the probability of having at least one unmet need from individual (predisposing, enabling, and need) characteristics with state-level home help coverage rates, intensity of home help services, and proportion of population aged 60+ residing in institutional settings. Consistent with past research, a majority (52.6%) of the disabled sample reported unmet need. At the individual level, enabling (availability of kin support) and need (number of basic and instrumental activity of daily living impairments, BADLs and IADLs) were most strongly associated with care mix and unmet need. State-level services were not associated with receipt of informal supports. In states providing home help services to a higher proportion of elders, women were more likely to receive formal help. In states providing more intensive services, women were less likely and individuals living alone more likely to receive formal supports. In states where a higher proportion of elders lived in nursing homes, individuals living alone were more likely to receive formal assistance, less likely overall to report unmet needs, but the oldest-old were more likely to report unmet need.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2013. Vol. 44, no 4, 437-453 p.
Keyword [en]
old age, care needs, USA
National Category
Social Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-21743Local ID: HHJövrigtISOAI: oai:DiVA.org:hj-21743DiVA: diva2:640454
Available from: 2013-08-13 Created: 2013-08-13 Last updated: 2014-03-04Bibliographically approved

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CiteExportLink to record
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Citation style
  • apa
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